Browsing by Subject "EXCESSIVE DAYTIME SLEEPINESS"

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  • Sarkanen, Tomi; Alakuijala, Anniina; Partinen, Markku (2016)
    Objective: To follow and analyze the clinical course and quality of life of Pandemrix H1N1-vaccinerelated narcolepsy (pNT1). Methods: Twenty-six drug-naive confirmed pNT1 subjects completed Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Ullanlinna Narcolepsy Scale (UNS), Swiss Narcolepsy Scale (SNS), Rimon's Brief Depression scale (RDS), and WHO-5 Well-being index questionnaires near the disease onset and in a follow-up a minimum of two years later. The number of cataplexies and body mass index (BMI) were recorded. The effects of hypocretin-1 levels and sleep recording results were analyzed. The findings at the follow-up visit were compared with 25 non-vaccine-related type 1 narcolepsy (NT1) subjects. Results: In pNT1, RDS score decreased significantly (mean 10.2, SD 4.7 vs mean 6.7, SD 4.5, p = 0.003). Median of BMI increased from 20.8 kg m(-2) to 23.4 kg m(-2), p <0.001. There were no significant differences in other sleep scores. However, deviation and range in questionnaire scores at the follow-up were wide. Subjects with very low or undetectable hypocretin-1 levels had worse scores in UNS (mean 26.4, SD 6.95 vs mean 19.1, SD 3.83, p = 0.006) and ESS (mean 17.9, SD = 4.29 vs mean 14.1, SD = 3.70, p = 0.047) than those with hypocretin-1 levels of 20-110 pg/mL. Most disabling symptoms were excessive daytime sleepiness and disturbed sleep. There were no significant differences between the scores in pNT1 and NT1. Conclusions: Clinical course of pNT1 is heterogeneous but the evolution of pNT1 seems similar to NT1. Lower hypocretin levels in pNT1 are associated with a more severe phenotype. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Bassetti, Claudio L. A.; Kallweit, Ulf; Vignatelli, Luca; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Lecendreux, Michel; Baldin, Elisa; Dolenc-Groselj, Leja; Jennum, Poul; Khatami, Ramin; Manconi, Mauro; Mayer, Geert; Partinen, Markku; Pollmaecher, Thomas; Reading, Paul; Santamaria, Joan; Sonka, Karel; Dauvilliers, Yves; Lammers, Gert J. (2021)
    Background and purpose Narcolepsy is an uncommon hypothalamic disorder of presumed autoimmune origin that usually requires lifelong treatment. This paper aims to provide evidence-based guidelines for the management of narcolepsy in both adults and children. Methods The European Academy of Neurology (EAN), European Sleep Research Society (ESRS), and European Narcolepsy Network (EU-NN) nominated a task force of 18 narcolepsy specialists. According to the EAN recommendations, 10 relevant clinical questions were formulated in PICO format. Following a systematic review of the literature (performed in Fall 2018 and updated in July 2020) recommendations were developed according to the GRADE approach. Results A total of 10,247 references were evaluated, 308 studies were assessed and 155 finally included. The main recommendations can be summarized as follows: (i) excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in adults-scheduled naps, modafinil, pitolisant, sodium oxybate (SXB), solriamfetol (all strong); methylphenidate, amphetamine derivatives (both weak); (ii) cataplexy in adults-SXB, venlafaxine, clomipramine (all strong) and pitolisant (weak); (iii) EDS in children-scheduled naps, SXB (both strong), modafinil, methylphenidate, pitolisant, amphetamine derivatives (all weak); (iv) cataplexy in children-SXB (strong), antidepressants (weak). Treatment choices should be tailored to each patient's symptoms, comorbidities, tolerance and risk of potential drug interactions. Conclusion The management of narcolepsy involves non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches with an increasing number of symptomatic treatment options for adults and children that have been studied in some detail.
  • Bassetti, Claudio L. A.; Kallweit, Ulf; Vignatelli, Luca; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Lecendreux, Michel; Baldin, Elisa; Dolenc-Groselj, Leja; Jennum, Poul; Khatami, Ramin; Manconi, Mauro; Mayer, Geert; Partinen, Markku; Pollmaecher, Thomas; Reading, Paul; Santamaria, Joan; Sonka, Karel; Dauvilliers, Yves; Lammers, Gert J. (2021)
    Background and purpose: Narcolepsy is an uncommon hypothalamic disorder of presumed autoimmune origin that usually requires lifelong treatment. This paper aims to provide evidence-based guidelines for the management of narcolepsy in both adults and children. Methods: The European Academy of Neurology (EAN), European Sleep Research Society (ESRS), and European Narcolepsy Network (EU-NN) nominated a task force of 18 narcolepsy specialists. According to the EAN recommendations, 10 relevant clinical questions were formulated in PICO format. Following a systematic review of the literature (performed in Fall 2018 and updated in July 2020) recommendations were developed according to the GRADE approach. Results: A total of 10,247 references were evaluated, 308 studies were assessed and 155 finally included. The main recommendations can be summarized as follows: (i) excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in adults-scheduled naps, modafinil, pitolisant, sodium oxybate (SXB), solriamfetol (all strong); methylphenidate, amphetamine derivatives (both weak); (ii) cataplexy in adults-SXB, venlafaxine, clomipramine (all strong) and pitolisant (weak); (iii) EDS in children-scheduled naps, SXB (both strong), modafinil, methylphenidate, pitolisant, amphetamine derivatives (all weak); (iv) cataplexy in children-SXB (strong), antidepressants (weak). Treatment choices should be tailored to each patient's symptoms, comorbidities, tolerance and risk of potential drug interactions. Conclusion: The management of narcolepsy involves non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches with an increasing number of symptomatic treatment options for adults and children that have been studied in some detail.