Browsing by Subject "EXPERIMENTAL COLITIS"

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  • Peuhkuri, Katri; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Korpela, Riitta (2011)
  • Li, Wei; Li, Yunzhan; Liu, Zehua; Kerdsakundee, Nattha; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Xueyan; Bauleth-Ramos, Tomás; Mäkilä, Ermei; Kemell, Marianna; Ding, Yaping; Sarmento, Bruno; Wiwattanapatapee, Ruedeekorn; Salonen, Jarno; Zhang, Hongbo; Hirvonen, Jouni T.; Liu, Dongfei; Deng, Xianming; Santos, Hélder A. (2018)
    Orally administrable drug delivery vehicles are developed to manage incurable inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), however, their therapeutic outcomes are compromised by the side effects of systemic drug exposure. Herein, we use hyaluronic acid functionalized porous silicon nanoparticle to bridge enzyme-responsive hydrogel and pH-responsive polymer, generating a hierarchical structured (nano-in-nano-in-micro) vehicle with programmed properties to fully and sequentially overcome the multiple obstacles for efficiently delivering drugs locally to inflamed sites of intestine. After oral administration, the pH-responsive matrix protects the embedded hybrid nanoparticles containing drug loaded hydrogels against the spatially variable physiological environments of the gastrointestinal tract until they reach the inflamed sites of intestine, preventing premature drug release. The negatively charged hybrid nanoparticles selectively target the inflamed sites of intestine, and gradually release drug in response to the microenvironment of inflamed intestine. Overall, the developed hierarchical structured and programmed vehicles load, protect, transport and release drugs locally to inflamed sites of intestine, contributing to superior therapeutic outcomes. Such strategy could also inspire the development of numerous hierarchical structured vehicles by other porous nanoparticles and stimuli-responsive materials for the local delivery of various drugs to treat plenty of inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases, including IBD, gastrointestinal cancers and viral infections.
  • Hanifeh, Mohsen; Rajamäki, Minna Marjaana; Syrjä, Pernilla; Mäkitalo, Laura; Kilpinen, Susanne; Spillmann, Thomas (2018)
    Background: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9 are zinc-and calcium-dependent endopeptidases involved in the breakdown and reconstitution of extracellular matrix under both physiological and pathological conditions. Mucosal MMP-2 and -9 activities have been reported to be upregulated in the intestine of humans with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and in animal models of IBD. However, their involvement in the pathogenesis of canine chronic enteropathies (CE) is unknown. This study investigated mucosal pro-and active MMP-2 and -9 activities in dogs with CE and healthy dogs using gelatin zymography, and also to determine the association of their activities in dogs with CE with the canine IBD activity index (CIBDAI), histopathologic findings, the clinical outcome, and hypoalbuminemia. Intestinal mucosal samples from duodenum, ileum, colon, and cecum were collected from 40 dogs with CE and 18 healthy Beagle dogs. Results: In dogs with CE, the number of samples positive for mucosal pro-and active MMP-2 was significantly higher in the duodenum (P <0.0001 and P = 0.011, respectively), ileum (P = 0.002 and P = 0.018, respectively), and colon (P <0.0001 and P = 0.002, respectively), compared with healthy controls. Mucosal pro-MMP-9-positive samples in the duodenum and colon were significantly more frequent in dogs with CE than in healthy dogs (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.001, respectively). Despite the presence of mucosal samples positive for active MMP-9 in the intestinal segments of dogs with CE, the difference compared to healthy controls did not reach statistical significance. None of the intestinal mucosal samples in healthy dogs showed gelatinolytic activity corresponding to the control bands of active MMP-2 and -9. Mucosal active MMP-9 activities displayed a significant positive association with the severity of neutrophil infiltration in the duodenum (P = 00.040), eosinophils in the cecum (P = 00.037), and the CIBDAI score for ileum samples (P = 0.023). There was no significant association of pro-and active MMP-2 and -9 levels with the clinical outcome or hypoalbuminemia. Conclusions: This study is the first to demonstrate upregulation of mucosal pro-and active MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9 in the intestine of dogs with CE compared to healthy dogs. The results provide supporting evidence for the possible involvement of MMP-2 and -9 in the pathogenesis of canine CE.