Browsing by Subject "Endocarditis"

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  • Forsblom, Erik; Lepäntalo, Aino; Wartiovaara-Kautto, Ulla; Ruotsalainen, Eeva; Järvinen, Asko (2019)
    The aim of this study was to examine the changes in hemostasis parameters in endocarditis and thromboembolic events in nonfatal methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (MS-SAB) - a topic not evaluated previously. In total, 155 patients were recruited and were categorized according to the presence of endocarditis or thromboembolic events with gender-age adjusted controls. Patients who deceased within 90 days or patients not chosen as controls were excluded. SAB management was supervised by an infectious disease specialist. Patients with endocarditis (N = 21), compared to controls (N = 21), presented lower antithrombin III at day 4 (p <0.05), elevated antithrombin III at day 90 (p <0.01), prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time at days 4 and 10 (p <0.05), and enhanced thrombin-antithrombin complex at day 4 (p <0.01). Thromboembolic events (N = 8), compared to controls (N = 34), significantly increased thrombin-antithrombin complex at day 4 (p <0.05). In receiver operating characteristic analysis, the changes in these hemostasis parameters at day 4 predicted endocarditis and thromboembolic events (p <0.05). No differences in hemoglobin, thrombocyte, prothrombin fragment, thrombin time, factor VIII, D-dimer or fibrinogen levels were observed between cases and controls. The results suggest that nonfatal MS-SAB patients present marginal hemostasis parameter changes that, however, may have predictability for endocarditis or thromboembolic events. Larger studies are needed to further assess the connection of hemostasis to complications in SAB.
  • Halavaara, Mika; Martelius, Timi; Järvinen, Asko; Antikainen, Jenni; Kuusela, Pentti; Salminen, Ulla-Stina; Anttila, Veli-Jukka (2019)
    Treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) should be initiated promptly. This might hamper the chances to identify the causative organism in blood cultures. Microbiological sampling of infected valve in patients undergoing surgery might identify the causative organism. The impact of pre-operative antimicrobial treatment on the yield of valve samples is not known. This study evaluated the impact of the duration of the pre-operative antibiotic treatment on valve culture and 16S rRNA PCR findings from resected endocardial samples. Patients meeting the modified Duke criteria of definite or possible IE and undergoing valve surgery due to IE during 2011–2016 were included from Southern Finland. Eighty-seven patients were included. In patients with shorter than 2 weeks of pre-operative antimicrobial treatment, PCR was positive in 91% (n = 42/46) and valve culture in 41% (n = 19/46) of cases. However, in patients who had 2 weeks or longer therapy before operation, PCR was positive in 53% (n = 18/34) and all valve cultures were negative. In 14% of patients, PCR had a diagnostic impact. In blood-culture negative cases (n = 13), PCR could detect the causative organism in ten patients (77%). These included five cases of Bartonella quintana, one Tropheryma whipplei, and one Coxiella burnetii. Long pre-operative antimicrobial treatment was shown to have a negative impact on microbiological tests done on resected endocardial material. After 2 weeks of therapy, all valve cultures were negative, but PCR was positive in half of the cases. PCR aided in diagnostic work-up, especially in blood culture negative cases.
  • Kluger, Nicolas (2020)
    Complications associated with tattoos are mostly of cutaneous origin. They include chiefly ink allergy, local infection, benign tumors or malignant lesions and elective localization of various dermatoses. Tattoo-related systemic diseases and infections have more rarely been described, the most common being sarcoidosis and hepatitis C. However, unusual associations have also been reported, even though they may be anecdotal or likely unrelated with the procedure. (C) 2020 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.