Browsing by Subject "FAMILIES"

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  • Wegelius, Asko; Pankakoski, Maiju; Tomppo, Liisa; Lehto, Ulriika; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Suvisaari, Jaana; Paunio, Tiina; Hennah, William (2015)
    Pre- and perinatal environmental factors have been shown to increase schizophrenia risk particularly when combined with genetic liability. The investigation of specific gene environment interactions in the etiology of psychiatric disorders has gained momentum. We used multivariate GEE regression modeling to investigate the interaction between genes of the DISCI pathway and birth weight, in relation to schizophrenia susceptibility in a Finnish schizophrenia family cohort. The study sample consisted of 457 subjects with both genotype and birth weight information. Gender and place of birth were adjusted for in the models. We found a significant interaction between birth weight and two NDE1 markers in relation to increased schizophrenia risk: a four SNP haplotype spanning NDE1 (b = 1.26, SE= 0.5, p = 0.012) and one of its constituent SNPs rs4781678 (b = 1.33, SE = 0.51, p = 0.010). Specifically, high birth weight (> 4000 g) was associated with increased schizophrenia risk among subjects homozygous for the previously identified risk alleles. The study was based on a family study sample with high genetic loading for schizophrenia and thus our findings cannot directly be generalized as representing the general population. Our results suggest that the functions mediated by NDE1 during the early stages of neurodevelopment are susceptible to the additional disruptive effects of pre- and perinatal environmental factors associated with high birth weight, augmenting schizophrenia susceptibility. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • Santavirta, Torsten; Santavirta, Nina; Gilman, Stephen (2018)
    Importance Although there is evidence that adverse childhood experiences are associated with worse mental health in adulthood, scarce evidence is available regarding an emerging concern that the next generation might also be affected. Objective To compare the risk of psychiatric hospitalization in cousins whose parents were vs were not exposed to the Finnish evacuation policy that involved a mean 2-year stay with a Swedish foster family. Design, Setting, and Participants This multigenerational, population-based cohort study of Finnish individuals and their siblings born between January 1, 1933, and December 31, 1944, analyzed the association of evacuee status as a child during World War II in the first generation with the risk of psychiatric hospitalization among offspring in the second generation. Evacuee status during World War II was determined using the Finnish National Archive’s registry of participants in the Finnish evacuation. Data on evacuee status were linked to the psychiatric diagnoses in the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register from January 1, 1971, through December 31, 2012, for offspring (n = 93 391) born between January 1, 1950, and December 31, 2010. Sex-specific Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios for risk of psychiatric hospitalization during the follow-up period. Because offspring of evacuees and their nonevacuated siblings are cousins, the Cox proportional hazards regression models included fixed effects to adjust for confounding factors in families. Data analysis was performed from June 15, 2016, to August 26, 2017. Exposures Parental participation in the evacuation during World War II (coded 1 for parents who were evacuated and placed in foster care and 0 for those not evacuated). Main Outcomes and Measures Offspring’s initial admission to the hospital for a psychiatric disorder, obtained from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register from January 1, 1971, through December 31, 2012. Results Of the 93 391 study persons, 45 955 (49.2%) were women and 47 436 (50.8) were men; mean (SD) age in 2012 among survivors was 45.4 (6.58) years. Female offspring of mothers evacuated to Sweden during childhood had an elevated risk of psychiatric hospitalization (hazard ratio for any type of psychiatric disorder: 2.04 [95% CI, 1.04-4.01]; hazard ratio for mood disorder: 4.68 [95% CI, 1.92-11.42]). There was no excess risk of being hospitalized for a psychiatric disorder among women whose fathers were exposed to the Finnish evacuation policy during World War II or among men whose mothers or fathers were exposed. Conclusions and Relevance In a prior follow-up study of the Finnish evacuees, girls evacuated to Swedish foster families during World War II were more likely to be hospitalized for a psychiatric disorder—in particular, a mood disorder—in adulthood than their nonevacuated sisters. The present study found that the offspring of these individuals were also at risk for mental health problems that required hospitalization and suggests that early-life adversities, including war-related exposures, may be associated with mental health disorders that persist across generations.
  • Kankainen, Matti; Ojala, Teija; Holm, Liisa (2012)
  • Moller, Pal; Seppälä, Toni; Bernstein, Inge; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Sala, Paola; Evans, D. Gareth; Lindblom, Annika; Macrae, Finlay; Blanco, Ignacio; Sijmons, Rolf; Jeffries, Jacqueline; Vasen, Hans; Burn, John; Nakken, Sigve; Hovig, Eivind; Rodland, Einar Andreas; Tharmaratnam, Kukatharmini; Cappel, Wouter H. de Vos Tot Nederveen; Hill, James; Wijnen, Juul; Green, Kate; Lalloo, Fiona; Sunde, Lone; Mints, Miriam; Bertario, Lucio; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Morak, Monika; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Frayling, Ian M.; Plazzer, John-Paul; Pylvanainen, Kirsi; Sampson, Julian R.; Capella, Gabriel; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Moslein, Gabriela; Mallorca Grp (2017)
    Objective Estimates of cancer risk and the effects of surveillance in Lynch syndrome have been subject to bias, partly through reliance on retrospective studies. We sought to establish more robust estimates in patients undergoing prospective cancer surveillance. Design We undertook a multicentre study of patients carrying Lynch syndrome-associated mutations affecting MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Standardised information on surveillance, cancers and outcomes were collated in an Oracle relational database and analysed by age, sex and mutated gene. Results 1942 mutation carriers without previous cancer had follow-up including colonoscopic surveillance for 13 782 observation years. 314 patients developed cancer, mostly colorectal (n=151), endometrial (n=72) and ovarian (n=19). Cancers were detected from 25 years onwards in MLH1 and MSH2 mutation carriers, and from about 40 years in MSH6 and PMS2 carriers. Among first cancer detected in each patient the colorectal cancer cumulative incidences at 70 years by gene were 46%, 35%, 20% and 10% for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 mutation carriers, respectively. The equivalent cumulative incidences for endometrial cancer were 34%, 51%, 49% and 24%; and for ovarian cancer 11%, 15%, 0% and 0%. Ten-year crude survival was 87% after any cancer, 91% if the first cancer was colorectal, 98% if endometrial and 89% if ovarian. Conclusions The four Lynch syndrome-associated genes had different penetrance and expression. Colorectal cancer occurred frequently despite colonoscopic surveillance but resulted in few deaths. Using our data, a website has been established at http://LScarisk.org enabling calculation of cumulative cancer risks as an aid to genetic counselling in Lynch syndrome.
  • Hallamies, Sanna; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Poikonen-Saksela, Paula; Jekunen, Antti; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Auvinen, Paivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Mattson, Johanna; Nevanlinna, Heli (2017)
    Background: Several susceptibility genes have been established for female breast cancer, of which mutations in BRCA1 and especially in BRCA2 are also known risk factors for male breast cancer (MBC). The role of other breast cancer genes in MBC is less well understood. Methods: In this study, we have genotyped 68 MBC patients for the known breast or ovarian cancer associated mutations in the Finnish population in CHEK2, PALB2, RAD51C, RAD51D, and FANCM genes. Results: CHEK2 c.1100delC mutation was found in 4 patients (5.9%), which is significantly more frequent than in the control population (OR: 4.47, 95% CI 1.51-13.18, p = 0.019). Four CHEK2 I157T variants were also detected, but the frequency did not significantly differ from population controls (p = 0.781). No RAD51C, RAD51D, PALB2, or FANCM mutations were found. Conclusions: These data suggest that the CHEK2 c.1100delC mutation is associated with an increased risk for MBC in the Finnish population.
  • Seppala, Toni; Pylvanainen, Kirsi; Evans, Dafydd Gareth; Jarvinen, Heikki; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Bernstein, Inge; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Sala, Paola; Lindblom, Annika; Macrae, Finlay; Blanco, Ignacio; Sijmons, Rolf; Jeffries, Jacqueline; Vasen, Hans; Burn, John; Nakken, Sigve; Hovig, Eivind; Rodland, Einar Andreas; Tharmaratnam, Kukatharmini; Cappel, Wouter H. de Vos tot Nederveen; Hill, James; Wijnen, Juul; Jenkins, Mark; Genuardi, Maurizio; Green, Kate; Lalloo, Fiona; Sunde, Lone; Mints, Miriam; Bertario, Lucio; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Morak, Monika; Frayling, Ian M.; Plazzer, John-Paul; Sampson, Julian R.; Capella, Gabriel; Moslein, Gabriela; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Moller, Pal; Collaboration Mallorca Grp (2017)
    Background: We have previously reported a high incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in carriers of pathogenic MLH1 variants (path_MLH1) despite follow-up with colonoscopy including polypectomy. Methods: The cohort included Finnish carriers enrolled in 3-yearly colonoscopy (n = 505; 4625 observation years) and carriers from other countries enrolled in colonoscopy 2-yearly or more frequently (n = 439; 3299 observation years). We examined whether the longer interval between colonoscopies in Finland could explain the high incidence of CRC and whether disease expression correlated with differences in population CRC incidence. Results: Cumulative CRC incidences in carriers of path_MLH1 at 70-years of age were 41% for males and 36% for females in the Finnish series and 58% and 55% in the non-Finnish series, respectively (p > 0.05). Mean time from last colonoscopy to CRC was 32.7 months in the Finnish compared to 31.0 months in the non-Finnish (p > 0.05) and was therefore unaffected by the recommended colonoscopy interval. Differences in population incidence of CRC could not explain the lower point estimates for CRC in the Finnish series. Ten-year overall survival after CRC was similar for the Finnish and non-Finnish series (88% and 91%, respectively; p > 0.05). Conclusions: The hypothesis that the high incidence of CRC in path_MLH1 carriers was caused by a higher incidence in the Finnish series was not valid. We discuss whether the results were influenced by methodological shortcomings in our study or whether the assumption that a shorter interval between colonoscopies leads to a lower CRC incidence may be wrong. This second possibility is intriguing, because it suggests the dogma that CRC in path_MLH1 carriers develops from polyps that can be detected at colonoscopy and removed to prevent CRC may be erroneous. In view of the excellent 10-year overall survival in the Finnish and non-Finnish series we remain strong advocates of current surveillance practices for those with LS pending studies that will inform new recommendations on the best surveillance interval.
  • Holm, Liisa (2020)
    DALI is a popular resource for comparing protein structures. The software is based on distance-matrix alignment. The associated web server provides tools to navigate, integrate and organize some data pushed out by genomics and structural genomics. The server has been running continuously for the past 25 years. Structural biologists routinely use DALI to compare a new structure against previously known protein structures. If significant similarities are discovered, it may indicate a distant homology, that is, that the structures are of shared origin. This may be significant in determining the molecular mechanisms, as these may remain very similar from a distant predecessor to the present day, for example, from the last common ancestor of humans and bacteria. Meta-analysis of independent reference-based evaluations of alignment accuracy and fold discrimination shows DALI at top rank in six out of 12 studies. The web server and standalone software are available from .
  • Kostjukovits, Svetlana; Degerman, Sofie; Pekkinen, Minna; Klemetti, Paula; Landfors, Mattias; Roos, Goran; Taskinen, Mervi; Makitie, Outi (2017)
    Background Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH) is an autosomal recessive chondrodysplasia caused by RMRP (RNA component of mitochondrial RNA processing endoribonuclease) gene mutations. Manifestations include short stature, variable immunodeficiency, anaemia and increased risk of malignancies, all of which have been described also in telomere biology disorders. RMRP interacts with the telomerase RT (TERT) subunit, but the influence of RMRP mutations on telomere length is unknown. We measured relative telomere length (RTL) in patients with CHH, their first-degree relatives and healthy controls and correlated RTL with clinical and laboratory features. Methods The study cohort included 48 patients with CHH with homozygous (n=36) or compound heterozygous RMRP mutations (median age 38.2 years, range 6.0-70.8 years), 86 relatives (74 with a heterozygous RMRP mutation) and 94 unrelated healthy controls. We extracted DNA from peripheral blood, sequenced the RMRP gene and measured RTL by qPCR. Results Compared with age-matched and sex-matched healthy controls, median RTL was significantly shorter in patients with CHH (n=40 pairs, 1.05 vs 1.21, p=0.017), but not in mutation carriers (n=48 pairs, 1.16 vs 1.10, p=0.224). RTL correlated significantly with age in RMRP mutation carriers (r=-0.482, p <0.001) and non-carriers (r=-0.498, p Conclusions Telomere length was decreased in children with CHH. We found no correlation between RTL and clinical or laboratory parameters.
  • Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Kousa, Youssef A.; Smith, Tiffany L.; Dunnwald, Martine; Magnusson, Mans; Lentz, Brian A.; Unneberg, Per; Fransson, Ingegerd; Koillinen, Hannele K.; Rautio, Jorma; Pegelow, Marie; Karsten, Agneta; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Gordon, William; Andersen, Bogi; Svensson, Thomas; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Cornell, Robert A.; Kere, Juha; Schutte, Brian C. (2014)
  • Kiiski, Johanna; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Freysteinsdottir, Edda S.; Reynisdottir, Inga; Hart, Steven N.; Shimelis, Hermela; Vilske, Sara; Kallioniemi, Anne; Schleutker, Johanna; Leminen, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Blomqvist, Carl; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Couch, Fergus J.; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli (2014)
  • Kaartokallio, Tea; Wang, Jingwen; Heinonen, Seppo Tapani; Kajantie, Eero; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Gerdhem, Paul; Jiao, Hong; Kere, Juha; Laivuori, Hannele (2016)
    Pre-eclampsia is a common pregnancy disorder that is a major cause for maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Variants predisposing to pre-eclampsia might be under negative evolutionary selection that is likely to keep their population frequencies low. We exome sequenced samples from a hundred Finnish pre-eclamptic women in pools of ten to screen for low-frequency, large-effect risk variants for pre-eclampsia. After filtering and additional genotyping steps, we selected 28 low-frequency missense, nonsense and splice site variants that were enriched in the pre-eclampsia pools compared to reference data, and genotyped the variants in 1353 pre-eclamptic and 699 non-pre-eclamptic women to test the association of them with pre-eclampsia and quantitative traits relevant for the disease. Genotypes from the SISu project (n = 6118 exome sequenced Finnish samples) were included in the binary trait association analysis as a population reference to increase statistical power. In these analyses, none of the variants tested reached genome-wide significance. In conclusion, the genetic risk for pre-eclampsia is likely complex even in a population isolate like Finland, and larger sample sizes will be necessary to detect risk variants.
  • Kiiski, Johanna; Fagerholm, Rainer; Tervasmaki, Anna; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Jamshidi, Maral; Mantere, Tuomo; Pylkas, Katri; Bartek, Jiri; Bartkova, Jirina; Mannermaa, Arto; Tengstrom, Maria; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nevanlinna, Heli (2016)
    Breast cancer (BC) is a heterogeneous disease, and different tumor characteristics and genetic variation may affect the clinical outcome. The FANCM c.5101C> T nonsense mutation in the Finnish population associates with increased risk of breast cancer, especially for triple-negative breast cancer patients. To investigate the association of the mutation with disease prognosis, we studied tumor phenotype, treatment outcome, and patient survival in 3,933 invasive breast cancer patients, including 101 FANCM c.5101C> T mutation carriers and 3,832 non-carriers. We also examined association of the mutation with nuclear immunohistochemical staining of DNA repair markers in 1,240 breast tumors. The FANCM c.5101C>T mutation associated with poor 10-year breast cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio (HR) 51.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-2.52, p=0.018), with a more pronounced survival effect among familial cases (HR=2.93, 95% CI 1.5-5.76, p=1.80 x 10 23). Poor disease outcome of the carriers was also found among the estrogen receptor (ER) positive subgroup of patients (HR=1.8, 95% CI 1.09-2.98, p=0.021). Reduced survival was seen especially among patients who had not received radiotherapy (HR=3.43, 95% CI 1.6-7.34, p=1.50x10(-3)) but not among radiotherapy treated patients (HR=1.35, 95% CI 0.82-2.23, p=0.237). Significant interaction was found between the mutation and radiotherapy (p=0.040). Immunohistochemical analyses show that c.5101C> T carriers have reduced PAR-activity. Our results suggest that FANCM c.5101C>T nonsense mutation carriers have a reduced breast cancer survival but postoperative radiotherapy may diminish this survival disadvantage.
  • Kiiski, Johanna I.; Tervasmäki, Anna; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Mantere, Tuomo; Pylkäs, Katri; Mannermaa, Arto; Tengström, Maria; Kvist, Anders; Borg, Åke; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kallioniemi, Anne; Schleutker, Johanna; Bützow, Ralf; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Winqvist, Robert; Nevanlinna, Heli (2017)
    The FANCM c.5101C > T nonsense mutation was previously found to associate with breast cancer in the Finnish population, especially among triple-negative cases. Here, we studied the prevalence of three other FANCM variants: c.5791C > T, which has been reported to predispose to familial breast cancer, and the c.4025_4026delCT and c.5293dupA variants recently identified in Finnish cancer patients. We genotyped the FANCM c.5791C > T mutation in 4806 invasive breast cancer patients, including BRCA1/2 mutation negative familial cases and unselected cases, and in 2734 healthy population controls from four different geographical areas of Finland. The association of the mutation with breast cancer risk among patient subgroups was statistically evaluated. We further analyzed the combined risk associated with c.5101C > T and c.5791C > T mutations. We also genotyped 526 unselected ovarian cancer patients for the c.5791C > T mutation and 862 familial breast cancer patients for the c.4025_4026delCT and c.5293dupA variants. The frequency of the FANCM c.5791C > T mutation was higher among breast cancer cases than in controls (OR 1.94, 95% CI 0.87-4.32, P = 0.11), with a statistically significant association with triple-negative breast cancer (OR 5.14, 95% CI 1.65-16.0, P = 0.005). The combined analysis for c.5101C > T and c.5791C > T carriers confirmed a strong association with breast cancer (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.32-2.49, P = 0.0002), especially among the triple-negative patients (OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.77-5.35, P = 0.00007). For the other variants, only one additional c.4025_4026delCT carrier and no c.5293dupA carriers were observed. These results support the role of FANCM as a breast cancer susceptibility gene, particularly for triple-negative breast cancer.
  • McNeil, Robyn J.; McCarthy, Maria; Dunt, David; Thompson, Kate; Kosola, Silja; Orme, Lisa; Drew, Sarah; Sawyer, Susan (2019)
    This study examined the financial impact of cancer and the use of income support in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer and their parent caregivers. As part of a national Australian study exploring the psychosocial impacts of cancer, 196 AYAs ages 15 to 25 years, six to 24 months from diagnosis, and 204 parent caregivers from 18 cancer sites were surveyed. Logistic regression and chi-square analyses were conducted to assess the influence of clinical and sociodemographic variables on financial status. Qualitative responses were coded, and key themes were identified using thematic analysis. The findings indicate that more than half of AYAs and parents reported financial issues as a consequence of AYA cancer. Financial issues resulted from direct medical costs, associated costs from treatment, and indirect costs from loss of income. AYAs and parents reported that it was important for them to receive income support, both during and after cancer treatment. However, large proportions of those who reported needing income support had difficulty accessing it. AYAs and their families are substantially financially disadvantaged by cancer, many for a prolonged time. Patient- and family-centered assessments and interventions are required to reduce the financial burden of AYA cancer.
  • Ukkola-Vuoti, L.; Torniainen-Holm, M.; Ortega-Alonso, A.; Sinha, V.; Tuulio-Henriksson, A.; Paunio, T.; Lönnqvist, J.; Suvisaari, J.; Hennah, W. (2019)
    Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by a spectrum of symptoms and many different underlying causes. Thus, instead of using the broad diagnosis, intermediate phenotypes can be used to possibly decrease the underlying complexity of the disorder. Alongside the classical symptoms of delusions and hallucinations, cognitive deficits are a core feature of schizophrenia. To increase our understanding of the biological processes related to these cognitive deficits, we performed a genome-wide gene expression analysis. A battery of 14 neuropsychological tests was administered to 844 individuals from a Finnish familial schizophrenia cohort. We grouped the applied neuropsychological tests into five factors for further analysis. Cognitive endophenotypes, whole blood mRNA, genotype, and medication use data were studied from 47 individuals. Expression level of several RNA probes were significantly associated with cognitive performance. The factor representing Verbal Working Memory was associated with altered expression levels of 11 probes, of which one probe was also associated with a specific sub-measure of this factor (WMS-R Digit span backward). While, the factor Processing speed was related to one probe, which additionally associated among 55 probes with a specific sub-measure of this factor (WAIS-R Digit symbol). Two probes were associated with the measure recognition memory performance. Enrichment analysis of these differentially expressed probes highlighted immunological processes. Our findings are in line with genome-wide genetic discoveries made in schizophrenia, suggesting that immunological processes may be of biological interest for future drug design towards schizophrenia and the cognitive dysfunctions that underlie it.
  • Pelttari, L. M.; Shimelis, H.; Toiminen, H.; Kvist, A.; Törngren, T.; Borg, Å.; Blomqvist, C.; Bützow, R.; Couch, F.; Aittomäki, K.; Nevanlinna, H. (2018)
    Gene-panel sequencing allows comprehensive analysis of multiple genes simultaneously and is now routinely used in clinical mutation testing of high-risk breast and ovarian cancer patients. However, only BRCA1 and BRCA2 are often analyzed also for large genomic changes. Here, we have analyzed 10 clinically relevant susceptibility genes in 95 breast or ovarian cancer patients with gene-panel sequencing including also copy number variants (CNV) analysis for genomic changes. We identified 12 different pathogenic BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, PTEN, CHEK2, or RAD51C mutations in 18 of 95 patients (19%). BRCA1/2 mutations were observed in 8 patients (8.4%) and CHEK2 protein-truncating mutations in 7 patients (7.4%). In addition, we identified a novel duplication encompassing most of the RAD51C gene. We further genotyped the duplication in breast or ovarian cancer families (n=1149), in unselected breast (n=1729) and ovarian cancer cohorts (n=553), and in population controls (n=1273). Seven additional duplication carries were observed among cases but none among controls. The duplication associated with ovarian cancer risk (3/590 of all ovarian cancer patients, 0.5%, P=.032 compared with controls) and was found to represent a large fraction of all identified RAD51C mutations in the Finnish population. Our data emphasizes the importance of comprehensive mutation analysis including CNV detection in all the relevant genes.
  • Boraska, Vesna; Day-Williams, Aaron; Franklin, Christopher S.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Albrecht, Eva; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beilin, Lawrence J.; Bochud, Murielle; Cadby, Gemma; Ernst, Florian; Evans, David M.; Hayward, Caroline; Hicks, Andrew A.; Huffman, Jennifer; Huth, Cornelia; James, Alan L.; Klopp, Norman; Kolcic, Ivana; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Musk, Arthur W.; Pehlic, Marina; Pennell, Craig E.; Perry, John R. B.; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; St Pourcain, Beate; Ring, Susan M.; Salvi, Erika; Schipf, Sabine; Staessen, Jan A.; Teumer, Alexander; Timpson, Nicholas; Vitart, Veronique; Warrington, Nicole M.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; An, Ping; Anttila, Verneri; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Holmen, Jostein; Ntalla, Ioanna; Palotie, Aarno; Pietiläinen, Kirsi Hannele; Wedenoja, Juho; Winsvold, Bendik S.; Dedoussis, George V.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Province, Michael A.; Zwart, John-Anker; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Cusi, Daniele; Smith, George Davey; Frayling, Timothy M.; Gieger, Christian; Palmer, Lyle J.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rudan, Igor; Voelzke, Henry; Wichmann, H. Erich; Wright, Alan F.; Zeggini, Eleftheria (2012)
  • Bi, Qing-Fang; Jin, Bing-Jie; Zhu, Dong; Jiang, Yu-Gen; Zheng, Bang-Xiao; O'Connor, Patrick; Yang, Xiao-Ru; Richter, Andreas; Lin, Xian-Yong; Zhu, Yong-Guan (2021)
    The positive roles of earthworms on soil functionality has been extensively documented. The capacity of the earthworm gut microbiota on decomposition and nutrient cycling under long-term fertilization in field conditions has rarely been studied. Here, we report the structural, taxonomic, and functional responses of Eisenia foetida and Pheretima guillelmi gut microbiota to different fertilization regimes and durations using 16S rRNA gene-based Illumina sequencing and high-throughput quantitative PCR techniques. Our results revealed that the core gut microbiota, especially the fermentative bacteria were mainly sourced from the soil, but strongly stimulated with species-specificity, potential benefits for the host and soil health. The functional compositions of gut microbiota were altered by fertilization with fertilization duration being more influential than fertilization regimes. Moreover, the combination of organic and inorganic fertilization with the longer duration resulted in a higher richness and connectivity in the gut microbiota, and also their functional potential related to carbon (C), nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling, particularly the labile C decomposition, denitrification, and phosphate mobilization. We also found that long-term inorganic fertilization increased the abundance of pathogenic bacteria in the P. guillelmi gut. This study demonstrates that understanding earthworm gut microbiota can provide insights into how agricultural practices can potentially alter soil ecosystem functions through the interactions between soil and earthworm gut microbiotas.
  • Wang, Jingwen; Skoog, Tiina; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Kaartokallio, Tea; Laivuori, Hannele; Grauers, Anna; Gerdhem, Paul; Hytonen, Marjo; Lohi, Hannes; Kere, Juha; Jiao, Hong (2016)
    High-throughput sequencing using pooled DNA samples can facilitate genome-wide studies on rare and low-frequency variants in a large population. Some major questions concerning the pooling sequencing strategy are whether rare and low-frequency variants can be detected reliably, and whether estimated minor allele frequencies (MAFs) can represent the actual values obtained from individually genotyped samples. In this study, we evaluated MAF estimates using three variant detection tools with two sets of pooled whole exome sequencing (WES) and one set of pooled whole genome sequencing (WGS) data. Both GATK and Freebayes displayed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy when detecting rare or low-frequency variants. For the WGS study, 56% of the low-frequency variants in Illumina array have identical MAFs and 26% have one allele difference between sequencing and individual genotyping data. The MAF estimates from WGS correlated well (r = 0.94) with those from Illumina arrays. The MAFs from the pooled WES data also showed high concordance (r = 0.88) with those from the individual genotyping data. In conclusion, the MAFs estimated from pooled DNA sequencing data reflect the MAFs in individually genotyped samples well. The pooling strategy can thus be a rapid and cost-effective approach for the initial screening in large-scale association studies.