Browsing by Subject "FAMILY CONFLICT"

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  • Karhula, Kati; Koskinen, Aki; Ojajärvi, Anneli; Ropponen, Annina; Puttonen, Sampsa; Kivimäki, Mika; Harma, Mikko (2018)
    ObjectiveTo investigate whether changes in objective working hour characteristics are associated with parallel changes in work-life conflict (WLC) among hospital employees.MethodsSurvey responses from three waves of the Finnish Public Sector study (2008, 2012 and 2015) were combined with payroll data from 91 days preceding the surveys (n=2 482, 93% women). Time-dependent fixed effects regression models adjusted for marital status, number of children and stressfulness of the life situation were used to investigate whether changes in working hour characteristics were associated with parallel change in WLC. The working hour characteristics were dichotomised with cut-points in less than or greater than 10%or less than or greater than25%occurrence) and WLC to frequent versus seldom/none.ResultsChange in proportion of evening and night shifts and weekend work was significantly associated with parallel change in WLC (adjusted OR 2.19, 95%CI 1.62 to 2.96; OR 1.71, 95%CI 1.21 to 2.44; OR 1.63, 95%CI 1.194 to 2.22, respectively). Similarly, increase or decrease in proportion of quick returns (adjusted OR 1.45, 95%CI 1.10 to 1.89) and long work weeks (adjusted OR 1.26, 95%CI 1.04 to 1.52) was associated with parallel increase or decrease in WLC. Single days off and very long work weeks showed no association with WLC.ConclusionsChanges in unsocial working hour characteristics, especially in connection with evening shifts, are consistently associated with parallel changes in WLC.
  • Oksanen, Atte; Oksa, Reetta; Savela, Nina; Mantere, Eerik; Savolainen, Iina; Kaakinen, Markus (2021)
    The global crisis caused by the outbreak of a novel coronavirus and the associated disease (COVID-19) has changed working conditions due to social-distancing policies. Many workers started to use new technologies at work, including social media applications. In this longitudinal study, we investigated the potential stress effects of social media communication (SMC) at work. Based on our integrative theoretical model, we expected that SMC at work would burden some workers, but those who were accustomed to SMC at work would be better off when the crisis started. We collected a nationally representative sample of Finnish workers before (N = 1308) and during (N = 1081) the COVID-19 crisis. Outcome measures included technostress and work exhaustion. Multilevel linear mixed-effects regression models investigated formal and informal SMC at work. Covariates included cyberbullying at work, social media usage, personality, occupational status, and sociodemographic factors. Results showed that formal SMC increased and predicted higher technostress. However, technostress and work exhaustion decreased among workers already accustomed to using SMC at work before the crisis. The results indicate a disparity in workers' resilience during remote work and highlight a need for organizational level support.
  • Laine, Hanna; Saastamoinen, Peppiina; Lahti, Jouni; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero (2014)