Browsing by Subject "FLUXES"

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  • Song, Chaoqing; Luan, Junwei; Xu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Minna; Aurela, Mika; Lohila, Annalea; Mammarella, Ivan; Alekseychik, Pavel; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Gong, Wei; Chen, Xiuzhi; Meng, Xianhong; Yuan, Wenping (2020)
    Wetlands are one of the most important terrestrial ecosystems for land-atmosphere CH4 exchange. A new process-based, biophysical model to quantify CH4 emissions from natural wetlands was developed and integrated into a terrestrial ecosystem model (Integrated Biosphere Simulator). The new model represents a multisubstance system (CH4, O-2, CO2, and H-2) and describes CH4 production, oxidation, and three transport processes (diffusion, plant-mediated transport, and ebullition). The new model uses several critical microbial mechanisms to represent the interaction of anaerobic fermenters and homoacetogens, hydrogenotrophic, and acetoclastic methanogens, and methanotrophs in CH4 production and oxidation. We applied the model to 24 different wetlands globally to compare the simulated CH4 emissions to observations and conducted a sensitivity analysis. The results indicated that (1) for most sites, the model was able to capture the magnitude and variation of observed CH4 emissions under varying environmental conditions; (2) the parameters that regulate dissolved organic carbon and acetate production, and acetoclastic methanogenesis had the significant impact on simulated CH4 emissions; (3) the representation of the process components of CH4 cycling showed that CH4 oxidation was about half or more of CH4 production, and plant-mediated transport was the dominant pathway at most sites; and (4) the seasonality of simulated CH4 emissions can be controlled by soil temperature, water table position, or combinations thereof.
  • Keronen, Petri; Reissell, Anni; Chevallier, Frederic; Siivola, Erkki; Pohja, Toivo; Hiltunen, Veijo; Hatakka, Juha; Aalto, Tuula; Rivier, Leonard; Ciais, Philippe; Jordan, Armin; Hari, Pertti; Viisanen, Yrjo; Vesala, Timo (2014)
  • Vesala, Timo; Launiainen, Samuli; Kolari, Pasi; Pumpanen, Jukka; Sevanto, S.; Hari, Pertti; Nikinmaa, E.; Kaski, Petteri; Mannila, Heikki; Ukkonen, Esko; Piao, S. L.; Ciais, P. (2010)
  • Urzainki, Iñaki; Laurén, Ari; Palviainen, Marjo; Haahti, Kersti; Budiman, Arif; Basuki, Imam; Netzer, Michael; Hökkä, Hannu (2020)
    Drained peatlands are one of the main sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions globally. Emission reduction and, more generally, ecosystem restoration can be enhanced by raising the water table using canal or drain blocks. When restoring large areas, the number of blocks becomes limited by the available resources, which raises the following question: in which exact positions should a given number of blocks be placed in order to maximize the water table rise throughout the area? There is neither a simple nor an analytic answer. The water table response is a complex phenomenon that depends on several factors, such as the topology of the canal network, site topography, peat hydraulic properties, vegetation characteristics and meteorological conditions. We developed a new method to position the canal blocks based on the combination of a hydrological model and heuristic optimization algorithms. We simulated 3 d dry downs from a water saturated initial state for different block positions using the Boussinesq equation, and the block configurations maximizing water table rise were searched for by means of genetic algorithm and simulated annealing. We applied this approach to a large drained peatland area (931 km(2)) in Sumatra, Indonesia. Our solution consistently outperformed traditional block locating methods, indicating that drained peatland restoration can be made more effective at the same cost by selecting the positions of the blocks using the presented scheme.
  • Miettinen, H.; Pumpanen, J.; Rantakari, M.; Ojala, A. (2020)
    We studied in 2013 and 2014 the spring carbon dynamics in a Boreal landscape consisting of a lake and 15 inflowing streams and an outlet. The first year had weather and a hydrological regime typical of past years with a distinct spring freshet connected with the thaw of the average snowpack. The latter year had higher air temperatures which did not permit snow accumulation, despite similar winter precipitation. As such, there was hardly any spring freshet in 2014, and stream discharge peaked in January, i.e., the conditions resembled those predicted in the future climate. Despite the hydrological differences between the years, there were only small interannual differences in the stream CO2 and DOC concentrations. The relationship between the concentrations and discharge was stronger in the typical year. CO2 concentrations in medium-sized streams correlated negatively with the discharge, indicating dilution effect of melting snowpacks, while in large-sized streams the correlation was positive, suggesting stronger groundwater influence. The DOC pathway to these streams was through the subsurface soil layers, not the groundwater. The total amount of carbon transported into the lake was ca. 1.5-fold higher in the typical year than in the year with warm winter. In 2013, most of the lateral inputs took place during spring freshet. In 2014, the majority of inputs occurred earlier, during the winter months. The lateral CO2 signal was visible in the lake at 1.5 m depth. DOC dominated the carbon transport, and in both years, 12% of the input C was in inorganic form.
  • Saarela, Taija; Rissanen, Antti J.; Ojala, Anne; Pumpanen, Jukka; Aalto, Sanni L.; Tiirola, Marja; Vesala, Timo; Jäntti, Helena (2020)
    Freshwater ecosystems represent a significant natural source of methane (CH4). CH4 produced through anaerobic decomposition of organic matter (OM) in lake sediment and water column can be either oxidized to carbon dioxide (CO2) by methanotrophic microbes or emitted to the atmosphere. While the role of CH4 oxidation as a CH4 sink is widely accepted, neither the magnitude nor the drivers behind CH4 oxidation are well constrained. In this study, we aimed to gain more specific insight into CH4 oxidation in the water column of a seasonally stratified, typical boreal lake, particularly under hypoxic conditions. We used (CH4)-C-13 incubations to determine the active CH4 oxidation sites and the potential CH4 oxidation rates in the water column, and we measured environmental variables that could explain CH4 oxidation in the water column. During hypolimnetic hypoxia, 91% of available CH4 was oxidized in the active CH4 oxidation zone, where the potential CH4 oxidation rates gradually increased from the oxycline to the hypolimnion. Our results showed that in warm springs, which become more frequent, early thermal stratification with cold well-oxygenated hypolimnion delays the period of hypolimnetic hypoxia and limits CH4 production. Thus, the delayed development of hypolimnetic hypoxia may partially counteract the expected increase in the lacustrine CH4 emissions caused by the increasing organic carbon load from forested catchments.
  • Villnäs, Anna; Janas, Urzsula; Josefson, Alf B.; Kendzierska, Halina; Nygård, Henrik; Norkko, Joanna; Norkko, Alf (2019)
    Benthic macrofaunal communities have a profound impact on organic matter turnover and nutrient cycling in marine sediments. Their activities are of particular importance in the coastal filter, where nutrients and organic matter from land are transformed and/or retained before reaching the open sea. The benthic fauna modify the coastal filter directly (through consumption, respiration, excretion and biomass production) and indirectly (through bioturbation). It is hard to experimentally quantify faunal contribution to the coastal filter over large spatial and temporal scales that encompass significant environmental and biological heterogeneity. However, estimates can be obtained with biological trait analyses. By using benthic biological traits, we explored how the potential contribution of macrofaunal communities to the coastal filter differ between inner and outer sites in an extensive archipelago area and examine the generality of the observed pattern across contrasting coastal areas of the entire Baltic Sea. Estimates of benthic bioturbation, longevity and size (i.e. ‘stability’) and total energy and nutrient contents differed between coastal areas and inner versus outer sites. Benthic traits indicative of an enhanced nutrient turnover but a decreased capacity for temporal nutrient retention dominated inner sites, while outer sites were often dominated by larger individuals, exhibiting traits that are likely to enhance nutrient uptake and retention. The overarching similarities in benthic trait expression between more eutrophied inner vs. less affected outer coastal sites across the Baltic Sea suggest that benthic communities might contribute in a similar manner to nutrient recycling and retention in the coastal filter over large geographical scales.
  • Kok, L.; van Zyl, P. G.; Beukes, J. P.; Swartz, J-S; Burger, R. P.; Ellis, Suria; Josipovic, M.; Vakkari, V.; Laakso, L.; Kulmala, M. (2021)
    Relatively limited data have been published on the chemical composition of wet deposition for South Africa, which is considered an important source region for atmospheric pollutants. Concentrations and wet deposition fluxes of ionic species determined in rain samples collected from December 2014 to April 2018 at a regional site, Welgegund, are presented, and contextualised by wet deposition composition in the northeastern interior of South Africa. 89% of rain samples collected during the sampling period complied with the data quality objectives of the World Meteorological Organisation. The total ionic concentration of rainwater at Welgegund was similar to that at two regional sites located within proximity of industrial activities. The pH of rainwater (4.80) was comparable to that determined at two rural background sites, which indicated increased neutralisation. Similarly to the other sites located in the South African interior, SO42- was the most abundant species in rain, with concentrations thereof in the same order as SO42- levels determined at the two industrially influenced sites. Lower sulphur and nitrogen fluxes at Welgegund were attributed to lower average annual rainfall. The anthropogenic (industrial) source group had the largest contribution to wet deposition chemical composition, which signified the influence of major source regions in the South African interior that impact Welgegund. Relatively large contributions were also calculated from marine and crustal sources. The influence of agricultural activities was also evident, while biomass burning had the lowest contribution due to open biomass burning occurring mainly during the dry season
  • Yi, Chuixiang; Ricciuto, Daniel; Li, Runze; Wolbeck, John; Xu, Xiyan; Nilsson, Mats; Aires, Luis; Albertson, John D.; Ammann, Christof; Arain, M. Altaf; de Araujo, Alessandro C.; Aubinet, Marc; Aurela, Mika; Barcza, Zoltan; Barr, Alan; Berbigier, Paul; Beringer, Jason; Bernhofer, Christian; Black, Andrew T.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Bosveld, Fred C.; Broadmeadow, Mark S. J.; Buchmann, Nina; Burns, Sean P.; Cellier, Pierre; Chen, Jiquan; Ciais, Philippe; Clement, Robert; Cook, Bruce D.; Curtis, Peter S.; Dail, D. Bryan; Dellwik, Ebba; Delpierre, Nicolas; Desai, Ankur R.; Dore, Sabina; Dragoni, Danilo; Drake, Bert G.; Dufrene, Eric; Dunn, Allison; Elbers, Jan; Eugster, Werner; Falk, Matthias; Feigenwinter, Christian; Flanagan, Lawrence B.; Foken, Thomas; Frank, John; Fuhrer, Juerg; Gianelle, Damiano; Goldstein, Allen; Goulden, Mike; Granier, Andre; Gruenwald, Thomas; Gu, Lianhong; Guo, Haiqiang; Hammerle, Albin; Han, Shijie; Hanan, Niall P.; Haszpra, Laszlo; Heinesch, Bernard; Helfter, Carole; Hendriks, Dimmie; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Ibrom, Andreas; Jacobs, Cor; Johansson, Torbjoern; Jongen, Marjan; Katul, Gabriel; Kiely, Gerard; Klumpp, Katja; Knohl, Alexander; Kolb, Thomas; Kutsch, Werner L.; Lafleur, Peter; Laurila, Tuomas; Leuning, Ray; Lindroth, Anders; Liu, Heping; Loubet, Benjamin; Manca, Giovanni; Marek, Michal; Margolis, Hank A.; Martin, Timothy A.; Massman, William J.; Matamala, Roser; Matteucci, Giorgio; McCaughey, Harry; Merbold, Lutz; Meyers, Tilden; Migliavacca, Mirco; Miglietta, Franco; Misson, Laurent; Moelder, Meelis; Moncrieff, John; Monson, Russell K.; Montagnani, Leonardo; Montes-Helu, Mario; Moors, Eddy; Moureaux, Christine; Mukelabai, Mukufute M.; Munger, J. William; Myklebust, May; Nagy, Zoltan; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter; Oren, Ram; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Kyaw, Tha Paw U.; Pereira, Joao S.; Pilegaard, Kim; Pinter, Krisztina; Pio, Casimiro; Pita, Gabriel; Powell, Thomas L.; Rambal, Serge; Randerson, James T.; von Randow, Celso; Rebmann, Corinna; Rinne, Janne; Rossi, Federica; Roulet, Nigel; Ryel, Ronald J.; Sagerfors, Jorgen; Saigusa, Nobuko; Sanz, Maria Jose; Mugnozza, Giuseppe-Scarascia; Schmid, Hans Peter; Seufert, Guenther; Siqueira, Mario; Soussana, Jean-Francois; Starr, Gregory; Sutton, Mark A.; Tenhunen, John; Tuba, Zoltan; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Valentini, Riccardo; Vogel, Christoph S.; Wang, Shaoqiang; Wang, Weiguo; Welp, Lisa R.; Wen, Xuefa; Wharton, Sonia; Wilkinson, Matthew; Williams, Christopher A.; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Yamamoto, Susumu; Yu, Guirui; Zampedri, Roberto; Zhao, Bin; Zhao, Xinquan (2010)
  • Hooijer, A.; Page, S.; Canadell, J. G.; Silvius, M.; Kwadijk, J.; Wosten, H.; Jauhiainen, J. (2010)
  • Joensuu, Johanna; Raivonen, M.; Kieloaho, A. -J.; Altimir, N.; Kolari, P.; Sarjala, T.; Back, J. (2015)
  • Kulmala, Liisa; Peltokangas, Kenneth; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Pihlatie, Mari; Laurila, Tuomas; Liski, Jari; Lohila, Annalea (2022)
    Organic soil amendments such as manure, biochar and compost are among the most efficient and widely used methods to increase soil carbon sequestration in agricultural soils. Even though their benefits are well known, many wood-derived materials are not yet utilized in Nordic agriculture due to a lack of incentives and knowledge of their effects in the local climate. We studied greenhouse gas exchange, plant growth and soil properties of a clay soil cultivated with oat in southern Finland in an extremely dry year. Two years earlier, the field was treated with three ligneous soil amendments-lime-stabilized fiber from the pulp industry, willow biochar and spruce biochar-which we compared against fertilized and non-fertilized controls. We found that the soil amendments increased porosity and the mean soil water holding capacity, which was most noticeable in plots amended with spruce biochar. There was a trend indicating that the mean yield and overall biomass production were larger in plots with soil amendments; however, the difference to unamended control was seldom significant due to the high variance among replicates. Manual chamber measurements revealed that carbon dioxide and methane exchange rates were reduced most probably by the exceptionally hot and dry weather conditions, but no differences could be found between the amended and unamended treatments. The nitrous oxide emissions were significantly smaller from the vegetated soil amended with willow biochar compared with the unamended control. Emissions from non-vegetated soil, representing heterotrophic respiration, were similar but without significant differences between treatments. Overall, the studied soil amendments indicated positive climatic impact two years after their application, but further research is needed to conclusively characterize the specific effects of organic soil amendments on processes affecting greenhouse gas exchange and plant growth.
  • Heiskanen, Jouni J.; Mammarella, Ivan; Haapanala, Sami; Pumpanen, Jukka; Vesala, Timo; Macintyre, Sally; Ojala, Anne (2014)
  • Lahtinen, Laura; Mattila, Tuomas; Myllyviita, Tanja; Seppala, Jyri; Vasander, Harri (2022)
    Drained peatlands are a large emission source and a shift to paludiculture (rewetting and cultivation of wettolerant plants) is emerging as a potential emission reduction measure. Paludiculture can potentially results in emission savings from direct emissions, product substitution and carbon storage, but the whole life cycle climate impacts are rarely studied. In this study, we evaluated two paludiculture product systems (cattail (Typha) construction board and common reed (Phragmites) horticultural vermicompost) with cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment (LCA) applied global sensitivity analysis to identify, which parts of the product system would need more research and product development to ensure net emission savings. Based on the results, both product systems result in much lower emissions than current agricultural land use and may be net greenhouse gas sinks (average - 6.0 tCO2eq ha-1 for cattail board; -3.0 tCO2eq ha-1 for reed growing media). The uncertainty in the product life cycle is concentrated to a few key processes: the direct CO2 and CH4 emissions from paludiculture, construction board additives, and CH4 emissions from vermicomposting reed. Further research to these would minimize the uncertainty and help in maximizing the climate mitigation potential of paludiculture derived products.
  • Zhang, Fan; Shi, Xiaohong; Zhao, Shegnan; Arvola, Lauri; Huotari, Jussi; Hao, Ruonan (2022)
    Water quality monitoring buoy installed in the center of the eutrophic shallow lake Ulansuhai was used to explore the dissolved oxygen balance. A revised dissolved oxygen model for shallow eutrophic lakes was applied to identify trends in the lake's dissolved oxygen content during the non-frozen period and determine the equilibrium relationship of dissolved oxygen in the water body. The coefficient of determination and the Nash efficiency of the model proved the feasibility of the model. The main drivers affecting the dissolved oxygen balance of the lake were photosynthesis, aeration and the lateral movements of oxygen rich water, which accounted for 49.28, 14.72 and 36%, respectively, whereas respiration and sediment oxygen consumption, on the other hand, accounted for 1.56 and 98.44%, respectively. These findings suggest that photosynthesis and sediment oxygen consumption dominate the dissolved oxygen balance in eutrophic shallow lakes. A trend analysis of the average oxygen production and consumption rates indicated a maximum of 0.22 mg/L center dot h for photosynthesis and 0.20 mg/L center dot h for sediment oxygen consumption. A correlation analysis showed that water temperature was involved in changing the dissolved oxygen level of the lake mainly by affecting the oxygen consumption process.
  • Humborg, Christoph; Geibel, Marc. C.; Sun, Xiaole; McCrackin, Michelle; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Stranne, Christian; Jakobsson, Martin; Gustafsson, Bo; Sokolov, Alexander; Norkko, Alf; Norkko, Joanna (2019)
    The summer heat wave in 2018 led to the highest recorded water temperatures since 1926 – up to 21 C – in bottom coastal waters of the Baltic Sea, with implications for the respiration patterns in these shallow coastal systems. We applied cavity ring-down spectrometer measurements to continuously monitor carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) surface-water concentrations, covering the coastal archipelagos of Sweden and Finland and the open and deeper parts of the Northern Baltic Proper. This allowed us to i) follow an upwelling event near the Swedish coast leading to elevated CO2 and moderate CH4 outgassing, and ii) to estimate CH4 sources and fluxes along the coast by investigating water column inventories and air-sea fluxes during a storm and an associated downwelling event. At the end of the heat wave, before the storm event, we found elevated CO2 (1583 µatm) and CH4 (70 nmol/L) concentrations. During the storm, a massive CO2 sea-air flux of up to 274 mmol m-2 d-1 was observed. While water-column CO2 concentrations were depleted during several hours of the storm, CH4 concentrations remained elevated. Overall, we found a positive relationship between CO2 and CH4 wind-driven sea-air fluxes, however, the highest CH4 fluxes were observed at low winds whereas highest CO2 fluxes were during peak winds, suggesting different sources and processes controlling their fluxes besides wind. We applied a box-model approach to estimate the CH4 supply needed to sustain these elevated CH4 concentrations and the results suggest a large source flux of CH4 to the water column of 2.5 mmol m-2 d-1. These results are qualitatively supported by acoustic observations of vigorous and widespread outgassing from the sediments, with flares that could be traced throughout the water column penetrating the pycnocline and reaching the sea surface. The results suggest that the heat wave triggered CO2 and CH4 fluxes in the coastal zones that are comparable with maximum emission rates found in other hot spots, such as boreal and arctic lakes and wetlands. Further, the results suggest that heat waves are as important for CO2 and CH4 sea-air fluxes as the ice break up in spring.
  • Provenzale, Maria; Ojala, Anne; Heiskanen, Jouni; Erkkila, Kukka-Maaria; Mammarella, Ivan; Hari, Pertti; Vesala, Timo (2018)
    Lakes are important actors in biogeochemical cycles and a powerful natural source of CO2. However, they are not yet fully integrated in carbon global budgets, and the carbon cycle in the water is still poorly understood. In freshwater ecosystems, productivity studies have usually been carried out with traditional methods (bottle incubations, C-14 technique), which are imprecise and have a poor temporal resolution. Consequently, our ability to quantify and predict the net ecosystem productivity (NEP) is limited: the estimates are prone to errors and the NEP cannot be parameterised from environmental variables. Here we expand the testing of a free-water method based on the direct measurement of the CO2 concentration in the water. The approach was first proposed in 2008, but was tested on a very short data set (3 days) under specific conditions (autumn turnover); despite showing promising results, this method has been neglected by the scientific community. We tested the method under different conditions (summer stratification, typical summer conditions for boreal dark-water lakes) and on a much longer data set (40 days), and quantitatively validated it comparing our data and productivity models. We were able to evaluate the NEP with a high temporal resolution (minutes) and found a very good agreement (R-2 >= 0.71) with the models. We also estimated the parameters of the productivity-irradiance (PI) curves that allow the calculation of the NEP from irradiance and water temperature. Overall, our work shows that the approach is suitable for productivity studies under a wider range of conditions, and is an important step towards developing this method so that it becomes more widely used.
  • Tallberg, Petra; Räike, Antti; Lukkari, Kaarina; Leivuori, Mirja; Lehtoranta, Jouni; Pitkänen, Heikki (2012)
  • Tang, Xuguang; Li, Hengpeng; Desai, Ankur R.; Nagy, Zoltan; Luo, Juhua; Kolb, Thomas E.; Olioso, Albert; Xu, Xibao; Yao, Li; Kutsch, Werner; Pilegaard, Kim; Köstner, Barbara; Ammann, Christof (2014)
  • Abera, Temesgen; Heiskanen, Janne; Pellikka, Petri; Maeda, Eduardo (2020)
    Precipitation extremes have a strong influence on the exchange of energy and water between the land surface and the atmosphere. Although the Horn of Africa has faced recurrent drought and flood events in recent decades, it is still unclear how these events impact energy exchange and surface temperature across different ecosystems. Here, we analyzed the impact of precipitation extremes on spectral albedo (total shortwave, visible, and near-infrared (NIR) broadband albedos), energy balance, and surface temperature in four natural vegetation types: forest, savanna, grassland, and shrubland. We used remotely sensed observations of surface biophysical properties and climate from 2001 to 2016. Our results showed that, in forests and savannas, precipitation extremes led to divergent spectral changes in visible and NIR albedos, which cancelled each other limiting shortwave albedo changes. An exception to this pattern was observed in shrublands and grasslands, where both visible and NIR albedo increased during drought events. Given that shrublands and grasslands occupy a large fraction of the Horn of Africa (52%), our results unveil the importance of these ecosystems in driving the magnitude of shortwave radiative forcing in the region. The average regional shortwave radiative forcing during drought events (-0.64 W m(-2), SD 0.11) was around twice that of the extreme wet events (0.33 W m(-2), SD 0.09). Such shortwave forcing, however, was too small to influence the surface-atmosphere coupling. In contrast, the surface feedback through turbulent flux changes was strong across vegetation types and had a significant (P <0.05) impact on the surface temperature and net radiation anomalies, except in forests. The strongest energy exchange and surface temperature anomalies were observed over grassland and the smallest over forest, which was shown to be resilient to precipitation extremes. These results suggest that land management activities that support forest preservation, afforestation, and reforestation can help to mitigate the impact of drought through their role in modulating energy fluxes and surface temperature anomalies in the region.