Browsing by Subject "Falls"

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  • Blain, H.; Masud, T.; Dargent-Molina, P.; Martin, F. C.; Rosendahl, E.; van der Velde, N.; Bousquet, J.; Benetos, A.; Cooper, C.; Kanis, J. A.; Reginster, J. Y.; Rizzoli, R.; Cortet, B.; Barbagallo, M.; Dreinhofer, K. E.; Vellas, B.; Maggi, S.; Strandberg, T.; EUGMS Falls Fracture Interest Grp; Int Assoc Gerontology Geriatri; European Union Med Specialists EUM; Fragility Fracture Network FFN; European Soc Clinical Econ Aspects; Int Osteoporosis Fdn IOF (2016)
    Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest Group on Falls and Fracture Prevention of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS), in collaboration with the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics for the European Region (IAGG-ER), the European Union of Medical Specialists (EUMS), the International Osteoporosis Foundation - European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people.
  • Blain, H.; Masud, T.; Dargent-Molina, P.; Martin, F. C.; Rosendahl, E.; van der Velde, N.; Bousquet, J.; Benetos, A.; Cooper, C.; Kanis, J. A.; Reginster, J. Y.; Rizzoli, R.; Cortet, B.; Barbagallo, M.; Dreinhoefer, K. E.; Vellas, B.; Maggi, S.; Strandberg, T.; EUGMS Falls & Fracture Interest Gr; IAGG-ER; EUMS; FFN; European Soc Clinical & Econ Aspec; IOF (2016)
    Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest Group on Falls and Fracture Prevention of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, in collaboration with the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics for the European Region, the European Union of Medical Specialists, and the International Osteoporosis Foundation-European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people.
  • Blain, H.; Masud, T.; Dargent-Molina, P.; Martin, F. C.; Rosendahl, E.; van der Velde, N.; Bousquet, J.; Benetos, A.; Cooper, C.; Kanis, J. A.; Reginster, J. Y.; Rizzoli, R.; Cortet, B.; Barbagallo, M.; Dreinhoefer, K.; Vellas, B.; Maggi, S.; Strandberg, T.; Alvarez, M. N.; Annweiler, C.; Bernard, P. -L.; Beswetherick, N.; Bischoff-Ferrari, H. A.; Bloch, F.; Boddaert, J.; Bonnefoy, M.; Bousson, V.; Bourdel-Marchasson, I.; Capisizu, A.; Che, H.; Clara, J. G.; Combe, B.; Delignieres, D.; Eklund, P.; Emmelot-Vonk, M.; Freiberger, E.; Gauvain, J. -B.; Goswami, N.; Guldemond, N.; Herrero, A. C.; Joel, M. -E.; Jonsdottir, A. B.; Kemoun, G.; Kiss, I.; Kolk, H.; Kowalski, M. L.; Krajcik, S.; Kutsal, Y. G.; Lauretani, F.; Macijauskiene, J.; Int Assoc Gerontology Geriatrics; European Union Medical Specialists; Fragility Fracture Network FFN; EUGMS Falls Fracture Interest Grp; European Soc Clinical Economic; Osteoporosis Research Information; International Osteoporosis (2016)
    Prevention of fragility fractures in older people has become a public health priority, although the most appropriate and cost-effective strategy remains unclear. In the present statement, the Interest group on falls and fracture prevention of the European union geriatric medicine society (EUGMS), in collaboration with the International association of gerontology and geriatrics for the European region (IAGG-ER), the European union of medical specialists (EUMS), the Fragility fracture network (FFN), the International osteoporosis foundation (IOF) - European society for clinical and economic aspects of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis (ECCEO), outlines its views on the main points in the current debate in relation to the primary and secondary prevention of falls, the diagnosis and treatment of bone fragility, and the place of combined falls and fracture liaison services for fracture prevention in older people. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.
  • Jyväkorpi, Satu; Urtamo, Annele; Kivimäki, Mika; Strandberg, Timo (2020)
    Introduction: Falls are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in older people. We examined how nutritional factors are associated with self-reported falls in the oldest-old community-dwelling men. Methods: Participants of the longitudinal and socioeconomically homogenous Helsinki Businessmen Study are men born in 1919-1934. A cross-sectional analysis from a random sample of 122 home-living oldest-old men who underwent medical examinations in 2017-2018 is reported here. Food and nutrient intakes were retrieved from 3-day food diaries, and the number of falls during past year was requested in the screening questionnaire. Nutritional status was assessed using Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form (MNA-SF) and waist circumference was measured. Body composition was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-scans, physical performance with short physical performance battery (SPPB), sarcopenia status using European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People's 2 (EWGSOP2) criteria, and frailty with phenotypic criteria. Results: Mean age of participants was 87 years (range 83-99 years) and 30% reported at least one fall during past year. Falls were associated with higher waist circumference (p = .031), frailty (p < .001) and sarcopenia (p = .002), and inversely associated with SPPB total score (p = .002). Of nutritional factors, intakes of fish (p = .016), fish protein (p = .039), berry (p = .027) and vitamin D (p = .041), and snacking more protein between breakfast and lunch (p = .017) were inversely associated with falls. Red meat intake was associated with higher frequency of falls (p = .044). Conclusion: Higher waist circumference, but not body mass index, was associated with increased frequency of falls. Healthy dietary choices appeared protective from falls in these oldest-old men of similar socioeconomic status.
  • Brucoli, Matteo; Boffano, Paolo; Romeo, Irene; Corio, Chiara; Benech, Arnaldo; Ruslin, Muhammad; Forouzanfar, Tymour; Jensen, Thomas Starch-; Rodríguez-Santamarta, Tanía; de Vicente, Juan Carlos; Snäll, Johanna; Thorén, Hanna; Aničić, Boban; Konstantinovic, Vitomir S.; Pechalova, Petia; Pavlov, Nikolai; Daskalov, Hristo; Doykova, Iva; Kelemith, Kadri; Tamme, Tiia; Kopchak, Andrey; Shumynskyi, Ievgen; Corre, Pierre; Bertin, Helios; Goguet, Quentin; Anquetil, Marine; Louvrier, Aurélien; Meyer, Christophe; Dovšak, Tadej; Vozlič, David; Birk, Anže; Tarle, Marko; Dediol, Emil (2020)
    ABSTRACT Introduction: The progressive aging of European population seems to determine a change in the epidemiology, incidence and etiology of maxillofacial fractures with an increase in the frequency of old patients sustaining craniofacial trauma. The objective of the present study was to assess the demographic variables, causes, and patterns of facial fractures in elderly population (with 70 years or more). Materials and Methods: The data from all geriatric patients (70 years or more) with facial fractures between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2017, were collected. The following data were recorded for each patient: gender, age, voluptuary habits, comorbidities, etiology, site of facial fractures, synchronous body injuries, Facial Injury Severity Score (FISS). Results: A total of 1334 patients (599 male and 735 female patients) were included in the study. Mean age was 79.3 years, and 66% of patients reported one or more comorbidities. The most frequent cause of injury was fall and zygomatic fractures were the most frequently observed injuries. Falls were associated with a low FISS value (p<.005). Concomitant injuries were observed in 27.3% of patients. Falls were associated with the absence of concomitant injuries. The ninth decade (p <.05) and a high FISS score (p <.005) were associated with concomitant body injuries too. Conclusions: This study confirms the role of falls in the epidemiology of facial trauma in the elderly, but also highlights the frequency of involvement of females, and the high frequency of zygomatic fractures.
  • Barreto, Philipe de Souto; Maltais, Lois; Rosendahl, Erik; Vellas, Bruno; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Lamb, Sarah E.; Pitkälä, Kaisu; Rolland, Yves (2021)
    Background: To study the effects of exercise on falls, fractures, hospitalizations, and death in people with dementia. Method: We conducted an individual-level patient data meta-analysis of 7 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We looked for studies from the reference list of previous systematic reviews and undertook an electronic search for articles published between 2013 and 2019 in Ageline, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, PubMed, and SportsDiscus. Main (binary) outcome measures were the risk of mortality, hospitalization, faller, multiple faller, injurious faller, and fractures. Secondary (count) outcomes were the incident rates of hospitalizations, falls, and injurious falls. Results: From the 1314 participants, 771 were allocated to the exercise group and 543 to the control group. The number of cases regarding the main outcome measures in exercisers and controls were, respectively: 45 (5.8%) and 31 (5.7%) deaths; 102 (14.4%) and 65 (13.4%) participants hospitalized; 221 (34.4%) and 175 (41.3%) had at least 1 fall; 128 (20.2%) and 92 (21.7%) had multiple falls; 78 (24.8%) and 92 (29.3%) had injurious falls; and 19 (2.9%) and 15 (3.5%) had suffered a fracture. Two-step meta-analysis found no effects of exercise on any outcome. One-step meta-analysis found exercise reduced the risk of falls (odds ratio 0.75; 95% CI: 0.57-0.99). Exploratory analysis showed exercise decreased the rate of incident falls in participants with the lowest functional ability (incident rate ratio 0.48; 95% CI: 0.30-0.79). Conclusions: Although the 2-step meta-analysis suggests exercise does not have an effect on the outcomes, 1-step meta-analysis suggested that exercise may reduce fall risk. Data from further high-quality RCTs are still needed.
  • Roitto, Hanna-Maria; Öhman, Hannareeta; Salminen, Karoliina; Kautiainen, Hannu; Laurila, Jouko; Pitkälä, Kaisu H. (2020)
    Objectives: Falls and neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) are common among long-term care residents with cognitive impairment. Despite the high prevalence of falls and NPS, little is known about their association. The aim of our study was to explore how NPS, particularly the severity of NPS and specific NPS subgroups, are associated with falls and how psychotropics modify this association. Design: Longitudinal cohort study. Setting and Participants: In total, 532 long-term care residents aged 65 years or older in Helsinki, Finland. Methods: NPS were measured with Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) at baseline. Participants were grouped into 3 groups: no significant NPS (NPI points 0-3), low NPS burden (NPI 4-12), and high NPS burden (NPI >12). The number of falls, injuries, fractures, and hospitalizations were collected from medical records over 12 months following baseline assessment. Results: Altogether, 606 falls occurred during the follow-up year. The falls led to 121 injuries, 42 hospitalizations, and 20 fractures. Falls and injuries increased significantly with NPS burden (P <.001): 330 falls in the high NPS group (n = 184), 188 falls in the low NPS group (n = 181), and 88 falls in the no significant NPS group (n = 167). The risk of falling showed a curvilinear association with NPI total score. Of NPS subgroups, psychosis and hyperactivity were associated with a higher incidence rate ratio of falls, whereas apathy had a protective association even after adjustment for age, sex, and mobility. Affective symptoms were not associated with falls. Psychotropics did not modify the association between NPS burden and falls. Conclusions and Implications: The results of this study show that NPS, especially NPS severity, may predict falls and fall-related negative consequences. Severity of NPS should be taken into account when assessing fall risk in long-term care residents with cognitive impairment. (C) 2020 AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.
  • Perttilä, Niko; Ohman, H.; Strandberg, T. E.; Kautiainen, H.; Raivio, M.; Laakkonen, M. -L.; Savikko, N.; Tilvis, R. S.; Pitkala, K. H. (2016)
    Introduction: To investigate how frailty status affects the outcome of exercise intervention among home-dwelling participants with Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: This is a sub-group analysis of a randomized controlled trial. In this trial, home-dwelling participants with AD received either home-based or group-based exercise twice a week for one year (n = 129); the control group received normal care (n = 65). Both the intervention and control group were subdivided into two groups according to modified Fried criteria: prefrail (0-1 criteria) and advanced frailty (2-5 criteria). The Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and number of falls per person-years served as outcome measures. Results: Whereas there was no significant difference in FIM between the prefrail intervention (PRI) and control (PRC) groups at 3 or 6 months, the PRI group deteriorated significantly slower at 12 months (-6.6 [95% CI -8.6 to -4.5] for PRI and -11.1 [95% CI -13.9 to -8.3] for PRC; P = 0.010). Similarly, there was no significant difference between the advanced frailty intervention (AFI) and control (AFC) groups at 3 months, but the difference became significant at 6 months (-8.1 [95% CI -11.1 to -5.2] for AFI and -15.5 [95% CI -20.0 to -11.1] for AFC; P = 0.007) and at 12 months (-8.9 [95% CI -11.9 to -5.9] for AFI and -15.3 [95% CI -20.2 to -10.3] for AFC; P = 0.031). There was also a significant difference in the number of falls in favor of PRI and AFI groups compared to their respective control groups. Conclusion: A long-term exercise intervention benefited people with AD regardless of their stage of frailty. Trial registration: : ACTRN12608000037303. (C) 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS and European Union Geriatric Medicine Society. All rights reserved.
  • Uusi-Rasi, Kirsti; Kannus, Pekka; Karinkanta, Saija; Pasanen, Matti; Patil, Radhika; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel; Sievanen, Harri (2012)