Browsing by Subject "Familial aggregation"

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  • Jilani, Hannah S; Intemann, Timm; Bogl, Leonie H; Eiben, Gabriele; Molnar, Dénes; Moreno, Luis A; Pala, Valeria; Russo, Paola; Siani, Alfonso; Solea, Antonia; Veidebaum, Toomas; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Hebestreit, Antje (BioMed Central, 2017)
    Abstract Background Studies on aggregation of taste preferences among children and their siblings as well as their parents are scarce. We investigated the familial aggregation of taste preferences as well as the effect of sex, age, country of residence and education on variation in taste preferences in the pan- European I.Family cohort. Method Thirteen thousand one hundred sixty-five participants from 7 European countries, comprising 2,230 boys <12 years, 2,110 girls <12 years, 1,682 boys ≥12 years, 1,744 girls ≥12 years and 5,388 parents, completed a Food and Beverage Preference Questionnaire containing 63 food items representing the taste modalities sweet, bitter, salty and fatty. We identified food items that represent the different taste qualities using factor analysis. On the basis of preference ratings for these food and drink items, a preference score for each taste was calculated for children and parents individually. Sibling and parent-child correlations for taste preference scores were calculated. The proportion of variance in children’s preference scores that could be explained by their parents’ preference scores and potential correlates including sex, age and parental educational was explored. Results Mean taste preferences for sweet, salty and fatty decreased and for bitter increased with age. Taste preference scores correlated stronger between siblings than between children and parents. Children’s salty preference scores could be better explained by country than by family members. Children’s fatty preference scores could be better explained by family members than by country. Age explained 17% of the variance in sweet and 16% of the variance in fatty taste preference. Sex and education were not associated with taste preference scores. Conclusion Taste preferences are correlated between siblings. Country could explain part of the variance of salty preference scores in children which points to a cultural influence on salt preference. Further, age also explained a relevant proportion of variance in sweet and fatty preference scores.
  • Huovinen, Joel; Kastinen, Sami; Komulainen, Simo; Oinas, Minna; Avellan, Cecilia; Frantzen, Janek; Rinne, Jaakko; Ronkainen, Antti; Kauppinen, Mikko; Lonnrot, Kimmo; Perola, Markus; Pyykko, Okka T.; Koivisto, Anne M.; Remes, Anne M.; Soininen, Hilkka; Hiltunen, Mikko; Helisalmi, Seppo; Kurki, Mitja; Jaaskelainen, Juha E.; Leinonen, Ville (2016)
    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a late-onset surgically alleviated, progressive disease. We characterize a potential familial subgroup of iNPH in a nation-wide Finnish cohort of 375 shunt-operated iNPH-patients. The patients were questionnaired and phone-interviewed, whether they have relatives with either diagnosed iNPH or disease-related symptomatology. Then pedigrees of all families with more than one iNPH-case were drawn. Eighteen patients (4.8%) from 12 separate pedigrees had at least one shunt-operated relative whereas 42 patients (11%) had relatives with two or more triad symptoms. According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, familial iNPH-patients had up to 3-fold risk of clinical dementia compared to sporadic iNPH patients. This risk was independent from diagnosed Alzheimer's disease and APOE epsilon 4 genotype. This study describes a familial entity of iNPH offering a novel approach to discover the potential genetic characteristics of iNPH. Discovered pedigrees offer an intriguing opportunity to conduct longitudinal studies targeting potential preclinical signs of iNPH. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • DAGIS Consortium Grp (2018)
    Background: Studies investigating dietary resemblance between parents and their children have gained mixed results, and the resemblance seems to vary across nutrients, foods, dietary-assessment tools used, and parent-child pairs. We investigated parent-child dietary resemblance using a novel approach in applying statistical analysis, which allowed the comparison of 'whole-diet' between parents and their children. Additionally, we sought to establish whether sociodemographic factors or family meals were associated with dietary resemblance and whether parent-child dietary resemblance was dependent on the parent providing food consumption data on behalf of the child (father or mother, "the respondent"). Methods: The DAGIS study investigated health behaviors among Finnish preschoolers using a cross-sectional design. One parent filled in a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) measuring the child's food consumption outside preschool hours during the last week. In addition, we instructed both parents or legal guardians, should the child have two, to fill in a similar FFQ regarding their own food use. Parents also reported their educational level, the number of children living in the same household, and the number of family meals. As a measure of dietary resemblance between a parent and a child, we computed Spearman correlations ranging mostly from no resemblance (0) to complete resemblance (+1) between parent-child pairs over the 'whole-diet' (excluding preschool hours). These resemblance measures were further investigated using linear mixed models. Results: We obtained 665 father-child and 798 mother-child resemblance measures. Mother-child resemblance was on average 0.57 and stronger than father-child resemblance (0.50, p <0.0001), which was explained by a parent-respondent interaction: the diet of the child resembled more the diet of the parent who provided food consumption data for the child. In univariate models, father-and mother-reported number of family meals were positively associated with father-child and mother-child resemblances. Mother-reported number of family meals was positively associated with mother-child resemblance in a full model. Conclusions: The diet of the child seems to resemble more the diet of the parent responsible for the reporting of food consumption. Studies should report who provided the food consumption data for the child and take this into account in analyses, since reporter-bias can influence the results.
  • Vepsäläinen, Henna; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Fogelholm, Mikael; Korkalo, Liisa; Roos, Eva; Ray, Carola; Erkkola, Maijaliisa (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Studies investigating dietary resemblance between parents and their children have gained mixed results, and the resemblance seems to vary across nutrients, foods, dietary-assessment tools used, and parent-child pairs. We investigated parent-child dietary resemblance using a novel approach in applying statistical analysis, which allowed the comparison of ‘whole-diet’ between parents and their children. Additionally, we sought to establish whether sociodemographic factors or family meals were associated with dietary resemblance and whether parent-child dietary resemblance was dependent on the parent providing food consumption data on behalf of the child (father or mother, “the respondent”). Methods The DAGIS study investigated health behaviors among Finnish preschoolers using a cross-sectional design. One parent filled in a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) measuring the child’s food consumption outside preschool hours during the last week. In addition, we instructed both parents or legal guardians, should the child have two, to fill in a similar FFQ regarding their own food use. Parents also reported their educational level, the number of children living in the same household, and the number of family meals. As a measure of dietary resemblance between a parent and a child, we computed Spearman correlations ranging mostly from no resemblance (0) to complete resemblance (+ 1) between parent-child pairs over the ‘whole-diet’ (excluding preschool hours). These resemblance measures were further investigated using linear mixed models. Results We obtained 665 father-child and 798 mother-child resemblance measures. Mother-child resemblance was on average 0.57 and stronger than father-child resemblance (0.50, p < 0.0001), which was explained by a parent-respondent interaction: the diet of the child resembled more the diet of the parent who provided food consumption data for the child. In univariate models, father- and mother-reported number of family meals were positively associated with father-child and mother-child resemblances. Mother-reported number of family meals was positively associated with mother-child resemblance in a full model. Conclusions The diet of the child seems to resemble more the diet of the parent responsible for the reporting of food consumption. Studies should report who provided the food consumption data for the child and take this into account in analyses, since reporter-bias can influence the results.