Browsing by Subject "GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY"

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  • Euclid Theory Working Grp; Amendola, Luca; Montanari, Francesco (2018)
    Euclid is a European Space Agency medium-class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the cosmic vision 2015-2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and red-shifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Georgakakis, A.; Comparat, J.; Merloni, A.; Ciesla, L.; Aird, J.; Finoguenov, A. (2019)
    A semi-empirical model is presented that describes the distribution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on the cosmicweb. It populates dark-matter haloes in N-body simulations (MultiDark) with galaxy stellar masses using empirical relations based on abundance matching techniques, and then paints accretion events on these galaxies using state-of-the-art measurements of the AGN occupation of galaxies. The explicit assumption is that the large-scale distribution of AGN is independent of the physics of black hole fuelling. The model is shown to be consistent with current measurements of the two-point correlation function of AGN samples. It is then used to make inferences on the halo occupation of the AGN population. Mock AGNs are found in haloes with a broad distribution of masses with a mode of approximate to 10(12) h(-1) M-circle dot and a tail extending to cluster-size haloes. The clustering properties of the model AGN depend only weakly on accretion luminosity and redshift. The fraction of satellite AGN in the model increases steeply toward more massive haloes, in contrast with some recent observational results. This discrepancy, if confirmed, could point to a dependence of the halo occupation of AGN on the physics of black hole fuelling.
  • Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Keihanen, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lindholm, V.; Savelainen, M.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Valiviita, J. (2020)
    We present cosmological parameter results from the final full-mission Planck measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies, combining information from the temperature and polarization maps and the lensing reconstruction. Compared to the 2015 results, improved measurements of large-scale polarization allow the reionization optical depth to be measured with higher precision, leading to significant gains in the precision of other correlated parameters. Improved modelling of the small-scale polarization leads to more robust constraints on many parameters, with residual modelling uncertainties estimated to affect them only at the 0.5 sigma level. We find good consistency with the standard spatially-flat 6-parameter Lambda CDM cosmology having a power-law spectrum of adiabatic scalar perturbations (denoted "base Lambda CDM" in this paper), from polarization, temperature, and lensing, separately and in combination. A combined analysis gives dark matter density Omega (c)h(2)=0.120 +/- 0.001, baryon density Omega (b)h(2)=0.0224 +/- 0.0001, scalar spectral index n(s)=0.965 +/- 0.004, and optical depth tau =0.054 +/- 0.007 (in this abstract we quote 68% confidence regions on measured parameters and 95% on upper limits). The angular acoustic scale is measured to 0.03% precision, with 100 theta (*)=1.0411 +/- 0.0003. These results are only weakly dependent on the cosmological model and remain stable, with somewhat increased errors, in many commonly considered extensions. Assuming the base-Lambda CDM cosmology, the inferred (model-dependent) late-Universe parameters are: Hubble constant H-0=(67.4 +/- 0.5) km s(-1) Mpc(-1); matter density parameter Omega (m)=0.315 +/- 0.007; and matter fluctuation amplitude sigma (8)=0.811 +/- 0.006. We find no compelling evidence for extensions to the base-Lambda CDM model. Combining with baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements (and considering single-parameter extensions) we constrain the effective extra relativistic degrees of freedom to be N-eff=2.99 +/- 0.17, in agreement with the Standard Model prediction N-eff=3.046, and find that the neutrino mass is tightly constrained to Sigma m(nu)<0.12 eV. The CMB spectra continue to prefer higher lensing amplitudes than predicted in base CDM at over 2 sigma, which pulls some parameters that affect the lensing amplitude away from the Lambda CDM model; however, this is not supported by the lensing reconstruction or (in models that also change the background geometry) BAO data. The joint constraint with BAO measurements on spatial curvature is consistent with a flat universe, Omega (K)=0.001 +/- 0.002. Also combining with Type Ia supernovae (SNe), the dark-energy equation of state parameter is measured to be w(0)=-1.03 +/- 0.03, consistent with a cosmological constant. We find no evidence for deviations from a purely power-law primordial spectrum, and combining with data from BAO, BICEP2, and Keck Array data, we place a limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r(0.002)<0.06. Standard big-bang nucleosynthesis predictions for the helium and deuterium abundances for the base-CDM cosmology are in excellent agreement with observations. The Planck base-Lambda CDM results are in good agreement with BAO, SNe, and some galaxy lensing observations, but in slight tension with the Dark Energy Survey's combined-probe results including galaxy clustering (which prefers lower fluctuation amplitudes or matter density parameters), and in significant, 3.6 sigma, tension with local measurements of the Hubble constant (which prefer a higher value). Simple model extensions that can partially resolve these tensions are not favoured by the Planck data.
  • Balogh, Michael L.; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Muzzin, Adam; Rudnick, Gregory; Wilson, Gillian; Webb, Kristi; Biviano, Andrea; Boak, Kevin; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chan, Jeffrey; Cooper, M. C.; Gilbank, David G.; Gwyn, Stephen; Lidman, Chris; Matharu, Jasleen; McGee, Sean L.; Old, Lyndsay; Pintos-Castro, Irene; Reeves, Andrew M. M.; Shipley, Heath; Vulcani, Benedetta; Yee, Howard K. C.; Alonso, M. Victoria; Bellhouse, Callum; Cooke, Kevin C.; Davidson, Anna; De Lucia, Gabriella; Demarco, Ricardo; Drakos, Nicole; Fillingham, Sean P.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Ben Forrest; Golledge, Caelan; Jablonka, Pascale; Garcia, Diego Lambas; McNab, Karen; Muriel, Hernan; Nantais, Julie B.; Noble, Allison; Parker, Laura C.; Petter, Grayson; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Townsend, Melinda; Valotto, Carlos; Webb, Tracy; Zaritsky, Dennis (2021)
    We present the first public data release of the GOGREEN (Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments) and GCLASS (Gemini CLuster Astrophysics Spectroscopic Survey) surveys of galaxies in dense environments, spanning a redshift range 0.8 <z <1.5. The surveys consist of deep, multiwavelength photometry and extensive Gemini GMOS spectroscopy of galaxies in 26 overdense systems ranging in halo mass from small groups to the most massive clusters. The objective of both projects was primarily to understand how the evolution of galaxies is affected by their environment, and to determine the physical processes that lead to the quenching of star formation. There was an emphasis on obtaining unbiased spectroscopy over a wide stellar mass range (M greater than or similar to 2 x 10(10) M-circle dot), throughout and beyond the cluster virialized regions. The final spectroscopic sample includes 2771 unique objects, of which 2257 have reliable spectroscopic redshifts. Of these, 1704 have redshifts in the range 0.8 <z <1.5, and nearly 800 are confirmed cluster members. Imaging spans the full optical and near-infrared wavelength range, at depths comparable to the UltraVISTA survey, and includes Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 F160W (GOGREEN) and F140W (GCLASS). This data release includes fully reduced images and spectra, with catalogues of advanced data products including redshifts, line strengths, star formation rates, stellar masses, and rest-frame colours. Here, we present an overview of the data, including an analysis of the spectroscopic completeness and redshift quality.