Browsing by Subject "GASTROINTESTINAL-TRACT"

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  • Giaretta, Paula R.; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Jergens, Albert E.; Steiner, Jorg M.; Lidbury, Jonathan A.; Cook, Audrey K.; Hanifeh, Mohsen; Spillmann, Thomas; Kilpinen, Susanne; Syrja, Pernilla; Rech, Raquel R. (2020)
    The intestinal microbiota is believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease in humans and chronic inflammatory enteropathy (CIE) in dogs. While most previous studies have described the gut microbiota using sequencing methods, it is fundamental to assess the spatial distribution of the bacteria for a better understanding of their relationship with the host. The microbiota in the colonic mucosa of 22 dogs with CIE and 11 control dogs was investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a universal eubacterial probe (EUB338) and specific probes for select bacterial groups. The number of total bacteria labeled with EUB338 probe was lower within the colonic crypts of dogs with CIE compared to controls. Helicobacter spp. and Akkermansia spp. were decreased on the colonic surface and in the crypts of dogs with CIE. Dogs with CIE had increased number of Escherichia coli/Shigella spp. on the colonic surface and within the crypts compared to control dogs. In conclusion, the bacterial microbiota in the colonic mucosa differed between dogs with and without CIE, with depletion of the crypt bacteria in dogs with CIE. The crypt bacterial species that was intimately associated with the host mucosa in control dogs was composed mainly of Helicobacter spp.
  • Kolmeder, Carolin A.; de Been, Mark; Nikkilä, Janne; Ritamo, Ilja; Mättö, Jaana; Valmu, Leena; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Palva, Airi; Salonen, Anne; de Vos, Willem M. (2012)
  • Gerritsen, Jacoline; Hornung, Bastian; Renckens, Bernadette; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; dos Santos, Vitor A. P. Martins; Rijkers, Ger T.; Schaap, Peter J.; de Vos, Willem M.; Smidt, Hauke (2017)
    Background. The microbiota in the small intestine relies on their capacity to rapidly import and ferment available carbohydrates to survive in a complex and highly competitive ecosystem. Understanding how these communities function requires elucidating the role of its key players, the interactions among them and with their environment/host. Methods. The genome of the gut bacterium Romboutsia ilealis CRIBT was sequenced with multiple technologies (Illumina paired-end, mate-pair and PacBio). The transcriptome was sequenced (Illumina HiSeq) after growth on three different carbohydrate sources, and short chain fatty acids were measured via HPLC. Results. We present the complete genome of Romboutsia ilealis CRIBT, a natural inhabitant and key player of the small intestine of rats. R. ilealis CRIBT possesses a circular chromosome of 2,581,778 bp and a plasmid of 6,145 bp, carrying 2,351 and eight predicted protein coding sequences, respectively. Analysis of the genome revealed limited capacity to synthesize amino acids and vitamins, whereas multiple and partially redundant pathways for the utilization of different relatively simple carbohydrates are present. Transcriptome analysis allowed identification of the key components in the degradation of glucose, L-fucose and fructo-oligosaccharides. Discussion. This revealed that R. ilealis CRIBT is adapted to a nutrient-rich environment where carbohydrates, amino acids and vitamins are abundantly available.
  • Shetty, Sudarshan A.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Lahti, Leo; Smidt, Hauke; de Vos, Willem M. (2017)
    High individuality, large complexity and limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying human intestinal microbiome function remain the major challenges for designing beneficial modulation strategies. Exemplified by the analysis of intestinal bacteria in a thousand Western adults, we discuss key concepts of the human intestinal microbiome landscape, i.e. the compositional and functional 'core', the presence of community types and the existence of alternative stable states. Genomic investigation of core taxa revealed functional redundancy, which is expected to stabilize the ecosystem, as well as taxa with specialized functions that have the potential to shape the microbiome landscape. The contrast between Prevotella-and Bacteroides-dominated systems has been well described. However, less known is the effect of not so abundant bacteria, for example, Dialister spp. that have been proposed to exhibit distinct bistable dynamics. Studies employing time-series analysis have highlighted the dynamical variation in the microbiome landscape with and without the effect of defined perturbations, such as the use of antibiotics or dietary changes. We incorporate ecosystem-level observations of the human intestinal microbiota and its keystone species to suggest avenues for designing microbiome modulation strategies to improve host health.
  • Udayappan, Shanthadevi D.; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Bakker, Guido J.; Havik, Stefan R.; Herrema, Hilde; Cani, Patrice D.; Bouter, Kristien E.; Belzer, Clara; Witjes, Julia J.; Vrieze, Anne; de Sonnaville, Noor; Chaplin, Alice; van Raalte, Daniel H.; Aalvink, Steven; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Heilig, Hans G. H. J.; Bergstrom, Goran; van der Meij, Suzan; van Wagensveld, Bart A.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; Holleman, Frits; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Groen, Albert K.; Backhed, Fredrik; de Vos, Willem M.; Nieuwdorp, Max (2017)
    An altered intestinal microbiota composition has been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Low grade inflammation, potentially initiated by the intestinal microbiota, has been suggested to be a driving force in the development of insulin resistance in obesity. Here, we report that bacterial DNA is present in mesenteric adipose tissue of obese but otherwise healthy human subjects. Pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that DNA from the Gram-negative species Ralstonia was most prevalent. Interestingly, fecal abundance of Ralstonia pickettii was increased in obese subjects with pre-diabetes and T2DM. To assess if R. pickettii was causally involved in development of obesity and T2DM, we performed a proof-of-concept study in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. Compared to vehicle-treated control mice, R. pickettii-treated DIO mice had reduced glucose tolerance. In addition, circulating levels of endotoxin were increased in R. pickettii-treated mice. In conclusion, this study suggests that intestinal Ralstonia is increased in obese human subjects with T2DM and reciprocally worsens glucose tolerance in DIO mice.
  • Koskela, Katja A.; Kalin-Manttari, Laura; Hemmila, Heidi; Smura, Teemu; Kinnunen, Paula M.; Niemimaa, Jukka; Henttonen, Heikki; Nikkari, Simo (2017)
    Voles (Arvicolinae, Rodentia) are known carriers of zoonotic bacteria such as Bartonella spp. and Francisella tularensis. However, apart from F. tularensis, the bacterial microbiome of voles has not previously been determined in Finland and rarely elsewhere. Therefore, we studied liver samples from 61 voles using 16S ribosomal RNA gene PCR analysis, followed by Sanger sequencing. Twenty-three of these samples were also studied with tag-encoded pyrosequencing. The samples originated from 21 field voles (Microtus agrestis), 37 tundra voles (Microtus oeconomus), and 3 bank voles (Myodes glareolus). With the more conventional 16S rDNA PCR analysis, 90 (33%) of the recovered 269 sequence types could be identified to genus level, including Bartonella, Francisella, Mycoplasma, Anaplasma, and Acinetobacter in 31, 15, 9, 9, and 9 sequences, respectively. Seventy-five (28%) matched best with sequences of uncultured bacteria, of which 40/75 could be classified to the order Clostridiales and, more specifically, to families Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae. Pyrosequencing from 23 samples revealed comparable and similar results: clinically relevant bacterial families such as Mycoplasmataceae, Bartonellaceae, Anaplasmataceae, and Francisellaceae were recognized. These analyses revealed significant bacterial diversity in vole livers, consisting of distinct and constant sequence patterns reflecting bacteria found in the intestinal gut, but including some known zoonotic pathogens as well. The molecular bacterial sequence types determined with the two different techniques shared major similarities and verified remarkable congruency between the methods.
  • Nylund, Lotta; Satokari, Reetta; Nikkila, Janne; Rajilic-Stojanovic, Mirjana; Kalliomaki, Marko; Isolauri, Erika; Salminen, Seppo; de Vos, Willem M. (2013)
  • Hugenholtz, Floor; de Vos, Willem M. (2018)
    Since the early days of the intestinal microbiota research, mouse models have been used frequently to study the interaction of microbes with their host. However, to translate the knowledge gained from mouse studies to a human situation, the major spatio-temporal similarities and differences between intestinal microbiota in mice and humans need to be considered. This is done here with specific attention for the comparative physiology of the intestinal tract, the effect of dietary patterns and differences in genetics. Detailed phylogenetic and metagenomic analysis showed that while many common genera are found in the human and murine intestine, these differ strongly in abundance and in total only 4% of the bacterial genes are found to share considerable identity. Moreover, a large variety of murine strains is available yet most of the microbiota research is performed in wild-type, inbred strains and their transgenic derivatives. It has become increasingly clear that the providers, rearing facilities and the genetic background of these mice have a significant impact on the microbial composition and this is illustrated with recent experimental data. This may affect the reproducibility of mouse microbiota studies and their conclusions. Hence, future studies should take these into account to truly show the effect of diet, genotype or environmental factors on the microbial composition.
  • Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Dybedal, Ingunn; Gulen, Theo; Kristensen, Thomas K.; Moller, Michael B.; Ackermann, Leena; Saaf, Maria; Karlsson, Maria; Agertoft, Lone; Brixen, Kim; Hermann, Pernille; Stylianou, Eva; Mortz, Charlotte G.; Torfing, Trine; Havelund, Troels; Sander, Birgitta; Bergstrom, Anna; Bendix, Marie; Garvey, Lene H.; Weis Bjerrum, Ole; Valent, Peter; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Nilsson, Gunnar; Vestergaard, Hanne; Hagglund, Hans (2016)
    Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases defined by an increased number and accumulation of mast cells, and often also by signs and symptoms of mast cell activation. Disease subtypes range from indolent to rare aggressive forms. Mastocytosis affects people of all ages and has been considered rare; however, it is probably underdiagnosed with potential severe implications. Diagnosis can be challenging and symptoms may be complex and involve multiple organ-systems. In general it is advised that patients should be referred to centres with experience in the disease offering an individualized, multidisciplinary approach. We present here consensus recommendations from a Nordic expert group for the diagnosis and general management of patients with mastocytosis.
  • Borghammer, Per; Horsager, Jacob; Andersen, Katrine; Van den Berge, Nathalie; Raunio, Anna; Murayama, Shigeo; Parkkinen, Laura; Myllykangas, Liisa (2021)
    Aggregation of alpha-synuclein into inclusion bodies, termed Lewy pathology, is a defining feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). In the majority of post mortem cases, the distribution of Lewy pathology seems to follow two overarching patterns: a caudo-rostral pattern with relatively more pathology in the brainstem than in the telencephalon, and an amygdala-centered pattern with the most abundant pathology in the "center of the brain", including the amygdala, entorhinal cortex, and substantia nigra, and relatively less pathology in the lower brainstem and spinal autonomic nuclei. The recent body-first versus brain-first model of Lewy Body Disorders proposes that the initial pathogenic alpha-synuclein in some patients originates in the enteric nervous system with secondary spreading to the brain; and in other patients originates inside the CNS with secondary spreading to the lower brainstem and peripheral autonomic nervous system. Here, we use two existing post mortem datasets to explore the possibility that clinical body-first and brain-first subtypes are equivalent to the caudo-rostral and amygdala-centered patterns of Lewy pathology seen at post mortem.
  • Del Chierico, Federica; Vernocchi, Pamela; Petrucca, Andrea; Paci, Paola; Fuentes, Susana; Pratico, Giulia; Capuani, Giorgio; Masotti, Andrea; Reddel, Sofia; Russo, Alessandra; Vallone, Cristina; Salvatori, Guglielmo; Buffone, Elsa; Signore, Fabrizio; Rigon, Giuliano; Dotta, Andrea; Miccheli, Alfredo; de Vos, Willem M.; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Putignani, Lorenza (2015)
    The colonization and development of gut microbiota immediately after birth is highly variable and depends on several factors, such as delivery mode and modality of feeding during the first months of life. A cohort of 31 mother and neonate pairs, including 25 at-term caesarean (CS) and 6 vaginally (V) delivered neonates (DNs), were included in this study and 121 meconium/faecal samples were collected at days 1 through 30 following birth. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were assessed in 69 stool samples by phylogenetic microarray HITChip and inter- and intra-individual distributions were established by inter-OTUs correlation matrices and OTUs co-occurrence or co-exclusion networks. H-1-NMR metabolites were determined in 70 stool samples, PCA analysis was performed on 55 CS DNs samples, and metabolome/OTUs co-correlations were assessed in 45 CS samples, providing an integrated map of the early microbiota OTUs-metabolome. A microbiota "core" of OTUs was identified that was independent of delivery mode and lactation stage, suggesting highly specialized communities that act as seminal colonizers of microbial networks. Correlations among OTUs, metabolites, and OTUs-metabolites revealed metabolic profiles associated with early microbial ecological dynamics, maturation of milk components, and host physiology.
  • Kainulainen, Veera; Tang, Yurui; Spillmann, Thomas; Kilpinen, Susanne; Reunanen, Justus; Saris, Per E. J.; Satokari, Reetta (2015)
  • Alipour, Mohammad Jaber; Jalanka, Jonna; Pessa-Morikawa, Tiina; Kokkonen, Tuomo; Satokari, Reetta; Hynönen, Ulla; Iivanainen, Antti; Niku, Mikael (2018)
    Recent research suggests that the microbial colonization of the mammalian intestine may begin before birth, but the observations are controversial due to challenges in the reliable sampling and analysis of low-abundance microbiota. We studied the perinatal microbiota of calves by sampling them immediately at birth and during the first postnatal week. The large size of the bovine newborns allows sampling directly from rectum using contamination-shielded swabs. Our 16S rDNA data, purged of potential contaminant sequences shared with negative controls, indicates the existence of a diverse low-abundance microbiota in the newborn rectal meconium and mucosa. The newborn rectal microbiota was composed of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The microbial profile resembled dam oral rather than fecal or vaginal vestibular microbiota, but included typical intestinal taxa. During the first postnatal day, the rectum was invaded by Escherichia/Shigella and Clostridia, and the diversity collapsed. By 7 days, diversity was again increasing. In terms of relative abundance, Proteobacteria were replaced by Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, including Faecalibacterium, Bacteroides, Lactobacillus, Butyricicoccus and Bifidobacterium. Our observations suggest that mammals are seeded before birth with a diverse microbiota, but the microbiota changes rapidly in the early postnatal life.