Browsing by Subject "GEEC2 SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY"

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  • Balogh, Michael L.; Mcgee, Sean L.; Mok, Angus; Muzzin, Adam; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Bower, Richard G.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Hoekstra, Henk; Lidman, Chris; Mulchaey, John S.; Noble, Allison; Parker, Laura C.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Wilman, David J.; Webb, Tracy; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, Howard K. C. (2016)
    We present an analysis of galaxies in groups and clusters at 0.8 <z <1.2, from the GCLASS and GEEC2 spectroscopic surveys. We compute a 'conversion fraction' f(convert) that represents the fraction of galaxies that were prematurely quenched by their environment. For massive galaxies, M-star > 10(10.3) M-circle dot, we find f(convert) similar to 0.4 in the groups and similar to 0.6 in the clusters, similar to comparable measurements at z = 0. This means the time between first accretion into a more massive halo and final star formation quenching is t(p) similar to 2 Gyr. This is substantially longer than the estimated time required for a galaxy's star formation rate to become zero once it starts to decline, suggesting there is a long delay time during which little differential evolution occurs. In contrast with local observations we find evidence that this delay time-scale may depend on stellarmass, with t(p) approaching t(Hubble) for M-star similar to 10(9.5) M-circle dot. The result suggests that the delay time must not only be much shorter than it is today, but may also depend on stellar mass in a way that is not consistent with a simple evolution in proportion to the dynamical time. Instead, we find the data are well-matched by a model in which the decline in star formation is due to 'overconsumption', the exhaustion of a gas reservoir through star formation and expulsion via modest outflows in the absence of cosmological accretion. Dynamical gas removal processes, which are likely dominant in quenching newly accreted satellites today, may play only a secondary role at z = 1.
  • Balogh, Michael L.; Gilbank, David G.; Muzzin, Adam; Rudnick, Gregory; Cooper, Michael C.; Lidman, Chris; Biviano, Andrea; Demarco, Ricardo; McGee, Sean L.; Nantais, Julie B.; Noble, Allison; Old, Lyndsay; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, Howard K. C.; Bellhouse, Callum; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chan, Jeffrey; Pintos-Castro, Irene; Simpson, Rane; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Ziparo, Felicia; Victoria Alonso, Maria; Bower, Richard G.; De Lucia, Gabriella; Finoguenov, Alexis; Garcia Lambas, Diego; Muriel, Hernan; Parker, Laura C.; Rettura, Alessandro; Valotto, Carlos; Wetzel, Andrew (2017)
    We describe a new Large Program in progress on the Gemini North and South telescopes: Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments (GOGREEN). This is an imaging and deep spectroscopic survey of 21 galaxy systems at 1 <z <1.5, selected to span a factor > 10 in halo mass. The scientific objectives include measuring the role of environment in the evolution of low-mass galaxies, and measuring the dynamics and stellar contents of their host haloes. The targets are selected from the SpARCS, SPT, COSMOS, and SXDS surveys, to be the evolutionary counterparts of today's clusters and groups. The new red-sensitive Hamamatsu detectors on GMOS, coupled with the nod-and-shuffle sky subtraction, allow simultaneous wavelength coverage over lambda similar to 0.6-1.05 mu m, and this enables a homogeneous and statistically complete redshift survey of galaxies of all types. The spectroscopic sample targets galaxies with AB magnitudes z' <24.25 and [3.6] mu m <22.5, and is therefore statistically complete for stellar masses M* greater than or similar to 10(10.3) M-circle dot, for all galaxy types and over the entire redshift range. Deep, multiwavelength imaging has been acquired over larger fields for most systems, spanning u through K, in addition to deep IRAC imaging at 3.6 mu m. The spectroscopy is similar to 50 per cent complete as of semester 17A, and we anticipate a final sample of similar to 500 new cluster members. Combined with existing spectroscopy on the brighter galaxies from GCLASS, SPT, and other sources, GOGREEN will be a large legacy cluster and field galaxy sample at this redshift that spectroscopically covers a wide range in stellar mass, halo mass, and clustercentric radius.
  • Balogh, Michael L.; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Muzzin, Adam; Rudnick, Gregory; Wilson, Gillian; Webb, Kristi; Biviano, Andrea; Boak, Kevin; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chan, Jeffrey; Cooper, M. C.; Gilbank, David G.; Gwyn, Stephen; Lidman, Chris; Matharu, Jasleen; McGee, Sean L.; Old, Lyndsay; Pintos-Castro, Irene; Reeves, Andrew M. M.; Shipley, Heath; Vulcani, Benedetta; Yee, Howard K. C.; Alonso, M. Victoria; Bellhouse, Callum; Cooke, Kevin C.; Davidson, Anna; De Lucia, Gabriella; Demarco, Ricardo; Drakos, Nicole; Fillingham, Sean P.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Ben Forrest,; Golledge, Caelan; Jablonka, Pascale; Garcia, Diego Lambas; McNab, Karen; Muriel, Hernan; Nantais, Julie B.; Noble, Allison; Parker, Laura C.; Petter, Grayson; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Townsend, Melinda; Valotto, Carlos; Webb, Tracy; Zaritsky, Dennis (2021)
    We present the first public data release of the GOGREEN (Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments) and GCLASS (Gemini CLuster Astrophysics Spectroscopic Survey) surveys of galaxies in dense environments, spanning a redshift range 0.8 <z <1.5. The surveys consist of deep, multiwavelength photometry and extensive Gemini GMOS spectroscopy of galaxies in 26 overdense systems ranging in halo mass from small groups to the most massive clusters. The objective of both projects was primarily to understand how the evolution of galaxies is affected by their environment, and to determine the physical processes that lead to the quenching of star formation. There was an emphasis on obtaining unbiased spectroscopy over a wide stellar mass range (M greater than or similar to 2 x 10(10) M-circle dot), throughout and beyond the cluster virialized regions. The final spectroscopic sample includes 2771 unique objects, of which 2257 have reliable spectroscopic redshifts. Of these, 1704 have redshifts in the range 0.8 <z <1.5, and nearly 800 are confirmed cluster members. Imaging spans the full optical and near-infrared wavelength range, at depths comparable to the UltraVISTA survey, and includes Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 F160W (GOGREEN) and F140W (GCLASS). This data release includes fully reduced images and spectra, with catalogues of advanced data products including redshifts, line strengths, star formation rates, stellar masses, and rest-frame colours. Here, we present an overview of the data, including an analysis of the spectroscopic completeness and redshift quality.
  • Reeves, Andrew M. M.; Balogh, Michael L.; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Kukstas, Egidijus; McCarthy, Ian G.; Webb, Kristi; Muzzin, Adam; McGee, Sean; Rudnick, Gregory; Biviano, Andrea; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chan, Jeffrey C. C.; Cooper, M. C.; Demarco, Ricardo; Jablonka, Pascale; De Lucia, Gabriella; Vulcani, Benedetta; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, Howard K. C.; Zaritsky, Dennis (2021)
    We use photometric redshifts and statistical background subtraction to measure stellar mass functions in galaxy group-mass (4.5-8 x 10(13) M-circle dot) haloes at 1 < z < 1.5. Groups are selected from COSMOS and SXDF, based on X-ray imaging and sparse spectroscopy. Stellar mass (M-stell(ar)) functions are computed for quiescent and star-forming galaxies separately, based on their rest-frame UVJ colours. From these we compute the quiescent fraction and quiescent fraction excess (QFE) relative to the field as a function of M-stel(lar). QFE increases with M-st(ellar), similar to more massive clusters at 1 < z < 1.5. This contrasts with the apparent separability of M-stellar, and environmental factors on galaxy quiescent fractions at z similar to 0. We then compare our results with higher mass clusters at 1 < z < 1.5 and lower redshifts. We find a strong QFE dependence on halo mass at fixed M-ste(ll)ar; well fit by a logarithmic slope of d(QFE)/dlog (M-halo) similar to 0.24 +/- 0.04 for all M-stellar and redshift bins. This dependence is in remarkably good qualitative agreement with the hydrodynamic simulation BAHAMAS, but contradicts the observed dependence of QFE on M-stellar. We interpret the results using two toy models: one where a time delay until rapid (instantaneous) quenching begins upon accretion to the main progenitor ( 'no pre-processing') and one where it starts upon first becoming a satellite ('pre-processing'). Delay times appear to be halo mass-dependent, with a significantly stronger dependence required without pre-processing. We conclude that our results support models in which environmental quenching begins in low-mass ( 1.