Browsing by Subject "GENE DELIVERY"

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  • Bogacheva, Mariia; Egorova, Anna; Slita, Anna; Maretina, Marianna; Baranov, Vladislav; Kiselev, Anton (2017)
    The major barriers for intracellular DNA transportation by cationic polymers are their toxicity, poor endosomal escape and inefficient nuclear uptake. Therefore, we designed novel modular peptide-based carriers modified with SV40 nuclear localization signal (NLS). Core peptide consists of arginine, histidine and cysteine residues for DNA condensation, endosomal escape promotion and interpeptide cross-linking, respectively. We investigated three polyplexes with different NLS content (10 mol%, 50 mol% and 90 mol% of SV40 NLS) as vectors for intranuclear DNA delivery. All carriers tested were able to condense DNA, to protect it from DNAase I and were not toxic to the cells. We observed that cell cycle arrest by hydroxyurea did not affect transfection efficacy of NLS-modified carriers which we confirmed using quantitative confocal microscopy analysis. Overall, peptide carrier modified with 90 mol% of SV40 NLS provided efficient transfection and nuclear uptake in non-dividing cells. Thus, incorporation of NLS into arginine-rich cross-linking peptides is an adequate approach to the development of efficient intranuclear gene delivery vehicles. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Ramsay, Eva; Ravina, Manuela; Sarkhel, Sanjay; Hehir, Sarah; Cameron, Neil R.; Ilmarinen, Tanja; Skottman, Heli; Kjems, Jrgen; Urtti, Arto; Ruponen, Marika; Subrizi, Astrid (2020)
    Inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of several age-related ocular diseases, such as macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. The delivery of anti-inflammatory siRNA to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) may become a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of inflammation, if the efficient delivery of siRNA to target cells is accomplished. Unfortunately, so far, the siRNA delivery system selection performed in dividing RPE cells in vitro has been a poor predictor of the in vivo efficacy. Our study evaluates the silencing efficiency of polyplexes, lipoplexes, and lipidoid-siRNA complexes in dividing RPE cells as well as in physiologically relevant RPE cell models. We find that RPE cell differentiation alters their endocytic activity and causes a decrease in the uptake of siRNA complexes. In addition, we determine that melanosomal sequestration is another significant and previously unexplored barrier to gene silencing in pigmented cells. In summary, this study highlights the importance of choosing a physiologically relevant RPE cell model for the selection of siRNA delivery systems. Such cell models are expected to enable the identification of carriers with a high probability of success in vivo, and thus propel the development of siRNA therapeutics for ocular disease.
  • Kiviaho, Jenny K.; Linko, Veikko; Ora, Ari; Tiainen, Tony; Järvihaavisto, Erika; Mikkila, Joona; Tenhu, Heikki; Nonappa, [Tuntematon]; Kostiainen, Mauri A. (2016)
    DNA origamis are fully tailored, programmable, biocompatible and readily functionalizable nanostructures that provide an excellent foundation for the development of sophisticated drug-delivery systems. However, the DNA origami objects suffer from certain drawbacks such as low cell-transfection rates and low stability. A great deal of studies on polymer-based transfection agents, mainly focusing on polyplex formation and toxicity, exists. In this study, the electrostatic binding between a brick-like DNA origami and cationic block-copolymers was explored. The effect of the polymer structure on the binding was investigated and the toxicity of the polymer-origami complexes evaluated. The study shows that all of the analyzed polymers had a suitable binding efficiency irrespective of the block structure. It was also observed that the toxicity of polymer-origami complexes was insignificant at the biologically relevant concentration levels. Besides brick-like DNA origamis, tubular origami carriers equipped with enzymes were also coated with the polymers. By adjusting the amount of cationic polymers that cover the DNA structures, we showed that it is possible to control the enzyme kinetics of the complexes. This work gives a starting point for further development of biocompatible and effective polycation-based block copolymers that can be used in coating different DNA origami nanostructures for various bioapplications.
  • Saari, Heikki; Turunen, Tiia; Lohmus, Andres; Turunen, Mikko; Jalasvuori, Matti; Butcher, Sarah J.; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo; Viitala, Tapani; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Siljander, Pia R. M.; Yliperttula, Marjo (2020)
    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been showcased as auspicious candidates for delivering therapeutic cargo, including oncolytic viruses for cancer treatment. Delivery of oncolytic viruses in EVs could provide considerable advantages, hiding the viruses from the immune system and providing alternative entry pathways into cancer cells. Here we describe the formation and viral cargo of EVs secreted by cancer cells infected with an oncolytic adenovirus (IEVs, infected cell-derived EVs) as a function of time after infection. IEVs were secreted already before the lytic release of virions and their structure resembled normally secreted EVs, suggesting that they were not just apoptotic fragments of infected cells. IEVs were able to carry the viral genome and induce infection in other cancer cells. As such, the role of EVs in the life cycle of adenoviruses may be an important part of a successful infection and may also be harnessed for cancer- and gene therapy.
  • Barker, Roger A.; Björklund, Anders; Gash, Don M.; Whone, Alan; Laar, Amber Van; Kordower, Jeffrey H.; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Kieburtz, Karl; Saarma, Mart; Booms, Sigrid; Huttunen, Henri J.; Kells, Adrian P.; Fiandaca, Massimo S.; Stoessl, A. Jon; Eidelberg, David; Federoff, Howard; Voutilainen, Merja H.; Dexter, David T.; Eberling, Jamie; Brundin, Patrik; Isaacs, Lyndsey; Mursaleen, Leah; Bresolin, Eros; Carroll, Camille; Coles, Alasdair; Fiske, Brian; Matthews, Helen; Lungu, Codrin; Wyse, Richard K.; Stott, Simon; Lang, Anthony E. (2020)
    The concept of repairing the brain with growth factors has been pursued for many years in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including primarily Parkinson's disease (PD) using glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). This neurotrophic factor was discovered in 1993 and shown to have selective effects on promoting survival and regeneration of certain populations of neurons including the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. These observations led to a series of clinical trials in PD patients including using infusions or gene delivery of GDNF or the related growth factor, neurturin (NRTN). Initial studies, some of which were open label, suggested that this approach could be of value in PD when the agent was injected into the putamen rather than the cerebral ventricles. In subsequent double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, the most recent reporting in 2019, treatment with GDNF did not achieve its primary end point. As a result, there has been uncertainty as to whether GDNF (and by extrapolation, related GDNF family neurotrophic factors) has merit in the future treatment of PD. To critically appraise the existing work and its future, a special workshop was held to discuss and debate this issue. This paper is a summary of that meeting with recommendations on whether there is a future for this therapeutic approach and also what any future PD trial involving GDNF and other GDNF family neurotrophic factors should consider in its design.
  • Mahato, Arun Kumar; Kopra, Jaakko; Renko, Juho-Matti; Visnapuu, Tanel; Korhonen, Ilari; Pulkkinen, Nita; Bespalov, Maxim M.; Domanskyi, Andrii; Ronken, Eric; Piepponen, T. Petteri; Voutilainen, Merja H.; Tuominen, Raimo K.; Karelson, Mati; Sidorova, Yulia A.; Saarma, Mart (2020)
    Background Motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are caused by degeneration and progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons. Currently, no cure for this disease is available. Existing drugs alleviate PD symptoms but fail to halt neurodegeneration. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is able to protect and repair dopamine neurons in vitro and in animal models of PD, but the clinical use of GDNF is complicated by its pharmacokinetic properties. The present study aimed to evaluate the neuronal effects of a blood-brain-barrier penetrating small molecule GDNF receptor Rearranged in Transfection agonist, BT13, in the dopamine system. Methods We characterized the ability of BT13 to activate RET in immortalized cells, to support the survival of cultured dopamine neurons, to protect cultured dopamine neurons against neurotoxin-induced cell death, to activate intracellular signaling pathways both in vitro and in vivo, and to regulate dopamine release in the mouse striatum as well as BT13's distribution in the brain. Results BT13 potently activates RET and downstream signaling cascades such as Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase and AKT in immortalized cells. It supports the survival of cultured dopamine neurons from wild-type but not from RET-knockout mice. BT13 protects cultured dopamine neurons from 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced cell death only if they express RET. In addition, BT13 is absorbed in the brain, activates intracellular signaling cascades in dopamine neurons both in vitro and in vivo, and also stimulates the release of dopamine in the mouse striatum. Conclusion The GDNF receptor RET agonist BT13 demonstrates the potential for further development of novel disease-modifying treatments against PD. (c) 2019 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
  • Liu, Zehua; Wang, Shiqi; Tapeinos, Christos; Torrieri, Giulia; Känkänen, Voitto; Ibrahim, Nesma Elsayed Ahmed Ahmed; Python, Andre; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A. (2021)
    Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) is an innovative treatment strategy for a myriad of indications. Non-viral synthetic nanoparticles (NPs) have drawn extensive attention as vectors for RNAi due to their potential advantages, including improved safety, high delivery efficiency and economic feasibility. However, the complex natural process of RNAi and the susceptible nature of oligonucleotides render the NPs subject to particular design principles and requirements for practical fabrication. Here, we summarize the requirements and obstacles for fabricating non-viral nano-vectors for efficient RNAi. To address the delivery challenges, we discuss practical guidelines for materials selection and NP synthesis in order to maximize RNA encapsulation efficiency and protection against degradation, and to facilitate the cytosolic release of oligonucleotides. The current status of clinical translation of RNAi-based therapies and further perspectives for reducing the potential side effects are also reviewed. (c) 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
  • Vaha-Koskela, Markus; Tahtinen, Siri; Gronberg-Vaha-Koskela, Susanna; Taipale, Kristian; Saha, Dipongkor; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Ahonen, Marko; Rouvinen-Lagerstrom, Noora; Hirvinen, Mari; Veckman, Ville; Matikainen, Sampsa; Zhao, Fang; Pakarinen, Paivi; Salo, Jarmo; Kanerva, Anna; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hemminki, Akseli (2015)
    Successful cancer control relies on overcoming resistance to cell death and on activation of host antitumor immunity. Oncolytic viruses are particularly attractive in this regard, as they lyse infected tumor cells and trigger robust immune responses during the infection. However, repeated injections of the same virus promote antiviral rather than antitumor immunity and tumors may mount innate antiviral defenses to restrict oncolytic virus replication. In this article, we have explored if alternating the therapy virus could circumvent these problems. We demonstrate in two virus-resistant animal models a substantial delay in antiviral immune- and innate cellular response induction by alternating injections of two immunologically distinct oncolytic viruses, adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Our results are in support of clinical development of heterologous adeno-/vaccinia virus therapy of cancer.
  • Barattin, Michela; Mattarei, Andrea; Balasso, Anna; Paradisi, Cristina; Cantu, Laura; Del Favero, Elena; Viitala, Tapani; Mastrotto, Francesca; Caliceti, Paolo; Salmaso, Stefano (2018)
    An innovative pH-switchable colloidal system that can be exploited for site-selective anticancer drug delivery has been generated by liposome decoration with a new novel synthetic non-peptidic oligo-arginine cell-penetration enhancer (CPE) and a quenching PEGylated counterpart that detaches from the vesicle surface under the acidic conditions of tumors. The CPE module (Arg(4)-DAG) is formed by four arginine units conjugated to a first-generation (G1) 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic acid (bis-MPA)/2,2-bis(aminomethyl)propionic acid (bis-AMPA) polyester dendron terminating with 1,2-distearoyl-3-azidopropane for liposome bilayer insertion. The zeta potential of the Arg(4)-DAG-decorated liposomes increased up to +32 mV as the Arg(4)-DAG/lipids molar ratio increased. The Arg(4)-DAG liposome shielding at pH 7.4 was provided by methoxy-PEGS(5 kDa)-polymethacryloyl sulfadimethoxine (mPEG(5) (kDa)-SDM8) with 7.1 apparent pK(a). Zeta potential, surface plasmon resonance and synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering analyses showed that at pH 7.4 mPEG(5) (kDa)-SDM8 associates with polycationic Arg(4)-DAG-decorated liposomes yielding liposomes with neutral zeta potential. At pH 6.5, which mimics the tumor environment, mPEG(5) (kDa)-SDM8 detaches from the liposome surface yielding Arg(4)-DAG exposure. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed a 30-fold higher HeLa cancer cell association of the Arg(4)-DAG-decorated liposomes compared to non-decorated liposomes. At pH 7.4, the mPEG(5) (kDa)-SDM8-coated liposomes undergo low cell association while remarkable cell association occurred at pH 6.5, which allowed for the controlled intracellular delivery of model macromolecules and small molecules loaded in the liposome under tumor conditions.
  • Sidorova, Yulia A.; Saarma, Mart (2020)
    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family ligands (GFLs) are able to promote the survival of multiple neuronal populations in the body and, therefore, hold considerable promise for disease-modifying treatments of diseases and conditions caused by neurodegeneration. Available data reveal the potential of GFLs for the therapy of Parkinson's disease, neuropathic pain and diseases caused by retinal degeneration but, also, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and, possibly, Alzheimer's disease. Despite promising data collected in preclinical models, clinical translation of GFLs is yet to be conducted. The main reasons for the limited success of GFLs clinical development are the poor pharmacological characteristics of GFL proteins, such as the inability of GFLs to cross tissue barriers, poor diffusion in tissues, biphasic dose-response and activation of several receptors in the organism in different cell types, along with ethical limitations on patients' selection in clinical trials. The development of small molecules selectively targeting particular GFL receptors with improved pharmacokinetic properties can overcome many of the difficulties and limitations associated with the clinical use of GFL proteins. The current review lists several strategies to target the GFL receptor complex with drug-like molecules, discusses their advantages, provides an overview of available chemical scaffolds and peptides able to activate GFL receptors and describes the effects of these molecules in cultured cells and animal models.
  • Kuryk, Lukasz; Vassilev, Lotta; Ranki, Tuuli; Hemminki, Akseli; Karioja-Kallio, Aila; Levälampi, Onerva; Vuolanto, Antti; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Pesonen, Sari (2017)
    The purpose of this work was to carry out preclinical toxicity and bio-distribution studies required for regulatory approval of a clinical trial application for Phase I clinical studies of ONCOS-102 (Ad5/3-D24-GM-CSF) for therapy of advanced cancers (NCT01598129). The study design, route of administration and dosage differs from the clinical protocol and in more detail, investigate bio-distribution and toxicological profile of ONCOS-102 treatment in animal model. The study was carried out in 300 hamsters divided into nine test groups-three bio-distribution groups and six groups for analysis of toxicity. Hamsters received ONCOS-102 by intracardial, intraperitoneal or subcutaneous injections. Additionally, one group was administered twice a week with intraperitoneal injections of Cyclophosphamide. The control animals were administered with NaCl solution without ONCOS-102 in the same volume and the same way. No adverse effects of repeated administration of ONCOS-102 including body weight, food consumption, hematology and clinical chemistry parameters, histopathology and bio-accumulation were observed in the course of 6-month administration and following 3-month recovery period. All obtained findings indicate the treatment clinically safe.