Browsing by Subject "GENETICS"

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  • Weiss, Alexander; Baselmans, Bart M. L.; Hofer, Edith; Yang, Jingyun; Okbay, Aysu; Lind, Penelope A.; Miller, Mike B.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Zhao, Wei; Hagenaars, Saskia P.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Matteson, Lindsay K.; Snieder, Harold; Faul, Jessica D.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Tiemeier, Henning; Mosing, Miriam A.; Pattie, Alison; Davies, Gail; Liewald, David C.; Schmidt, Reinhold; De Jager, Philip L.; Heath, Andrew C.; Jokela, Markus; Starr, John M.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Johannesson, Magnus; Cesarini, David; Hofman, Albert; Harris, Sarah E.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Schmidt, Helena; Smith, Jacqui; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt; Bennett, David A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Deary, Ian J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bartels, Meike; Luciano, Michelle (2016)
    Approximately half of the variation in wellbeing measures overlaps with variation in personality traits. Studies of non-human primate pedigrees and human twins suggest that this is due to common genetic influences. We tested whether personality polygenic scores for the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) domains and for item response theory (IRT) derived extraversion and neuroticism scores predict variance in wellbeing measures. Polygenic scores were based on published genome-wide association (GWA) results in over 17,000 individuals for the NEO-FFI and in over 63,000 for the IRT extraversion and neuroticism traits. The NEO-FFI polygenic scores were used to predict life satisfaction in 7 cohorts, positive affect in 12 cohorts, and general wellbeing in 1 cohort (maximal N = 46,508). Meta-analysis of these results showed no significant association between NEO-FFI personality polygenic scores and the wellbeing measures. IRT extraversion and neuroticism polygenic scores were used to predict life satisfaction and positive affect in almost 37,000 individuals from UK Biobank. Significant positive associations (effect sizes
  • Li, Dong; Chang, Xiao; Connolly, John J.; Tian, Lifeng; Liu, Yichuan; Bhoj, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, Nora; Abrams, Debra; Li, Yun R.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Jin; Wang, Fengxiang; Snyder, James; Lemma, Maria; Hou, Cuiping; Wei, Zhi; Guo, Yiran; Qiu, Haijun; Mentch, Frank D.; Thomas, Kelly A.; Chiavacci, Rosetta M.; Cone, Roger; Li, Bingshan; Sleiman, Patrick A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Eating Disorders Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium; Kaprio, Jaakko; Palotie, Aarno; Raevuori-Helkamaa, Anu; Ripatti, Samuli; Price Fdn Collaborative Grp (2017)
    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of anorexia nervosa (AN) using a stringently defined phenotype. Analysis of phenotypic variability led to the identification of a specific genetic risk factor that approached genome-wide significance (rs929626 in EBF1 (Early B-Cell Factor 1); P = 2.04 x 10(-7); OR = 0.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.61-0.8) with independent replication (P = 0.04), suggesting a variant-mediated dysregulation of leptin signaling may play a role in AN. Multiple SNPs in LD with the variant support the nominal association. This demonstrates that although the clinical and etiologic heterogeneity of AN is universally recognized, further careful sub-typing of cases may provide more precise genomic signals. In this study, through a refinement of the phenotype spectrum of AN, we present a replicable GWAS signal that is nominally associated with AN, highlighting a potentially important candidate locus for further investigation.
  • Gasparini, Vanessa Rebecca; Binatti, Andrea; Coppe, Alessandro; Teramo, Antonella; Vicenzetto, Cristina; Calabretto, Giulia; Barila, Gregorio; Barizza, Annica; Giussani, Edoardo; Facco, Monica; Mustjoki, Satu; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Zambello, Renato; Bortoluzzi, Stefania (2020)
    The molecular pathogenesis of chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of natural killer (NK) cells (CLPD-NK) is poorly understood. Following the screening of 57 CLPD-NK patients, only five presented STAT3 mutations. WES profiling of 13 cases negative for STAT3/STAT5B mutations uncovered an average of 18 clonal, population rare and deleterious somatic variants per patient. The mutational landscape of CLPD-NK showed that most patients carry a heavy mutational burden, with major and subclonal deleterious mutations co-existing in the leukemic clone. Somatic mutations hit genes wired to cancer proliferation, survival, and migration pathways, in the first place Ras/MAPK, PI3K-AKT, in addition to JAK/STAT (PIK3R1 and PTK2). We confirmed variants with putative driver role of MAP10, MPZL1, RPS6KA1, SETD1B, TAOK2, TMEM127, and TNFRSF1A genes, and of genes linked to viral infections (DDX3X and RSF1) and DNA repair (PAXIP1). A truncating mutation of the epigenetic regulator TET2 and a variant likely abrogating PIK3R1-negative regulatory activity were validated. This study significantly furthered the view of the genes and pathways involved in CLPD-NK, indicated similarities with aggressive diseases of NK cells and detected mutated genes targetable by approved drugs, being a step forward to personalized precision medicine for CLPD-NK patients.
  • Helbig, Katherine L.; Hedrich, Ulrike B. S.; Shinde, Deepali N.; Krey, Ilona; Teichmann, Anne-Christin; Hentschel, Julia; Schubert, Julian; Chamberlin, Adam C.; Huether, Robert; Lu, Hsiao-Mei; Alcaraz, Wendy A.; Tang, Sha; Jungbluth, Chelsy; Dugan, Sarah L.; Vainionpaa, Leena; Karle, Kathrin N.; Synofzik, Matthis; Schols, Ludger; Schule, Rebecca; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Helbig, Ingo; Lerche, Holger; Lemke, Johannes R. (2016)
    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders with over 50 known causative genes. We identified a recurrent mutation in KCNA2 (c.881G>A, p.R294H), encoding the voltage-gated K+-channel, K(V)1.2, in two unrelated families with HSP, intellectual disability (ID), and ataxia. Follow-up analysis of >2,000 patients with various neurological phenotypes identified a de novo p.R294H mutation in a proband with ataxia and ID. Two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing mutant KV1.2 channels showed loss of function with a dominant-negative effect. Our findings highlight the phenotypic spectrum of a recurrent KCNA2 mutation, implicating ion channel dysfunction as a novel HSP disease mechanism.
  • Huusko, Johanna M.; Karjalainen, Minna K.; Mahlman, Mari; Haataja, Ritva; Kari, M. Anneli; Andersson, Sture; Toldi, Gergely; Tammela, Outi; Ramet, Mika; Lavoie, Pascal M.; Hallman, Mikko (2014)
  • Piirtola, Maarit; Kaprio, Jaakko; Ropponen, Annina (2014)
  • Carlsson, Annelie; Shepherd, Maggie; Ellard, Sian; Weedon, Michael; Lernmark, Ake; Forsander, Gun; Colclough, Kevin; Brahimi, Qefsere; Valtonen-Andre, Camilla; Ivarsson, Sten A.; Elding Larsson, Helena; Samuelsson, Ulf; Ortqvist, Eva; Groop, Leif; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Marcus, Claude; Hattersley, Andrew T. (2020)
    OBJECTIVE Identifying maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) in pediatric populations close to diabetes diagnosis is difficult. Misdiagnosis and unnecessary insulin treatment are common. We aimed to identify the discriminatory clinical features at diabetes diagnosis of patients with glucokinase (GCK), hepatocyte nuclear factor-1A (HNF1A), and HNF4A MODY in the pediatric population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Swedish patients (n = 3,933) aged 1-18 years, diagnosed with diabetes May 2005 to December 2010, were recruited from the national consecutive prospective cohort Better Diabetes Diagnosis. Clinical data, islet autoantibodies (GAD insulinoma antigen-2, zinc transporter 8, and insulin autoantibodies), HLA type, and C-peptide were collected at diagnosis. MODY was identified by sequencing GCK, HNF1A, and HNF4A, through either routine clinical or research testing. RESULTS The minimal prevalence of MODY was 1.2%. Discriminatory factors for MODY at diagnosis included four islet autoantibody negativity (100% vs. 11% not-known MODY; P = 2 x 10(-44)), HbA(1c) (7.0% vs. 10.7% [53 vs. 93 mmol/mol]; P = 1 x 10(-20)), plasma glucose (11.7 vs. 26.7 mmol/L; P = 3 x 10(-19)), parental diabetes (63% vs. 12%; P = 1 x 10(-15)), and diabetic ketoacidosis (0% vs. 15%; P = 0.001). Testing 303 autoantibody-negative patients identified 46 patients with MODY (detection rate 15%). Limiting testing to the 73 islet autoantibody-negative patients with HbA(1c)
  • Luyten, Walter; Antal, Peter; Braeckman, Bart P.; Bundy, Jake; Cirulli, Francesca; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Fuellen, Georg; Leroi, Armand; Liu, Qingfei; Martorell, Patricia; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Ristow, Michael; Saul, Nadine; Schoofs, Liliane; Siems, Karsten; Temmerman, Liesbet; Smets, Tina; Wolk, Alicja; Rattan, Suresh I. S. (2016)
    Human longevity continues to increase world-wide, often accompanied by decreasing birth rates. As a larger fraction of the population thus gets older, the number of people suffering from disease or disability increases dramatically, presenting a major societal challenge. Healthy ageing has therefore been selected by EU policy makers as an important priority ; it benefits not only the elderly but also their direct environment and broader society, as well as the economy. The theme of healthy ageing figures prominently in the Horizon 2020 programme , which has launched several research and innovation actions (RIA), like "Understanding health, ageing and disease: determinants, risk factors and pathways" in the work programme on "Personalising healthcare". Here we present our research proposal entitled "ageing with elegans" (AwE), funded by this RIA, which aims for better understanding of the factors causing health and disease in ageing, and to develop evidence-based prevention, diagnostic, therapeutic and other strategies. The aim of this article, authored by the principal investigators of the 17 collaborating teams, is to describe briefly the rationale, aims, strategies and work packages of AwE for the purposes of sharing our ideas and plans with the biogerontological community in order to invite scientific feedback, suggestions, and criticism.
  • Malhotra, Rajneesh; Kurian, Nisha; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Jiang, Fanyi; Monkley, Susan; DeMicco, Amy; Clausen, Ib G.; Dellgren, Göran; Edenro, Goran; Ahdesmaki, Miika J.; Clausen, Maryam; Oberg, Lisa; Israelsson, Elisabeth; Belfield, Graham; Vaarala, Outi (2017)
    Background BET proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRDT and BRD4) belong to the family of bromodomain containing proteins, which form a class of transcriptional co-regulators. BET proteins bind to acetylated lysine residues in the histones of nucleosomal chromatin and function either as co-activators or co-repressors of gene expression. An imbalance between HAT and HDAC activities resulting in hyperacetylation of histones has been identified in COPD. We hypothesized that pan-BET inhibitor (JQ1) treatment of BET protein interactions with hyperacety-lated sites in the chromatin will regulate excessive activation of pro-inflammatory genes in key inflammatory drivers of alveolar macrophages (AM) in COPD. Methods and findings Transcriptome analysis of AM from COPD patients indicated up-regulation of macrophage M1 type genes upon LPS stimulation. Pan-BET inhibitor JQ1 treatment attenuated expression of multiple genes, including pro-inflammatory cytokines and regulators of innate and adaptive immune cells. We demonstrated for the first time that JQ1 differentially modulated LPS-induced cytokine release from AM or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of COPD patients compared to PBMC of healthy controls. Using the BET regulated gene signature, we identified a subset of COPD patients, which we propose to benefit from BET inhibition. Conclusions This work demonstrates that the effects of pan-BET inhibition through JQ1 treatment of inflammatory cells differs between COPD patients and healthy controls, and the expression of BET protein regulated genes is altered in COPD. These findings provide evidence of histone hyperacetylation as a mechanism driving chronic inflammatory changes in COPD.
  • Mauramo, Matti; Ramseier, Adrian Markus; Buser, Andreas; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Weiger, Roland; Waltimo, Tuomas (2014)
  • Koskenvuo, Juha W.; Saarinen, Inka; Ahonen, Saija; Tommiska, Johanna; Weckström, Sini; Seppala, Eija H.; Tuupanen, Sari; Kangas-Kontio, Tiia; Schleit, Jennifer; Helio, Krista; Hathaway, Julie; Gummesson, Anders; Dahlberg, Pia; Ojala, Tiina H.; Vepsäläinen, Ville; Kytola, Ville; Muona, Mikko; Sistonen, Johanna; Salmenpera, Pertteli; Gentile, Massimiliano; Paananen, Jussi; Myllykangas, Samuel; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Heliö, Tiina (2021)
    Background Familial dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is typically a monogenic disorder with dominant inheritance. Although over 40 genes have been linked to DCM, more than half of the patients undergoing comprehensive genetic testing are left without molecular diagnosis. Recently, biallelic protein-truncating variants (PTVs) in the nebulin-related anchoring protein gene (NRAP) were identified in a few patients with sporadic DCM. Methods and results We determined the frequency of rare NRAP variants in a cohort of DCM patients and control patients to further evaluate role of this gene in cardiomyopathies. A retrospective analysis of our internal variant database consisting of 31,639 individuals who underwent genetic testing (either panel or direct exome sequencing) was performed. The DCM group included 577 patients with either a confirmed or suspected DCM diagnosis. A control cohort of 31,062 individuals, including 25,912 individuals with non-cardiac (control group) and 5,150 with non-DCM cardiac indications (Non-DCM cardiac group). Biallelic (n = 6) or two (n = 5) NRAP variants (two PTVs or PTV+missense) were identified in 11 unrelated probands with DCM (1.9%) but none of the controls. None of the 11 probands had an alternative molecular diagnosis. Family member testing supports co-segregation. Biallelic or potentially biallelic NRAP variants were enriched in DCM vs. controls (OR 1052, p Conclusion Loss-of-function in NRAP is a cause for autosomal recessive dilated cardiomyopathy, supporting its inclusion in comprehensive genetic testing.
  • Koskenvuo, Juha W.; Saarinen, Inka; Ahonen, Saija; Tommiska, Johanna; Weckström, Sini; Seppala, Eija H.; Tuupanen, Sari; Kangas-Kontio, Tiia; Schleit, Jennifer; Helio, Krista; Hathaway, Julie; Gummesson, Anders; Dahlberg, Pia; Ojala, Tiina H.; Vepsäläinen, Ville; Kytola, Ville; Muona, Mikko; Sistonen, Johanna; Salmenpera, Pertteli; Gentile, Massimiliano; Paananen, Jussi; Myllykangas, Samuel; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Heliö, Tiina (2021)
    Background Familial dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is typically a monogenic disorder with dominant inheritance. Although over 40 genes have been linked to DCM, more than half of the patients undergoing comprehensive genetic testing are left without molecular diagnosis. Recently, biallelic protein-truncating variants (PTVs) in the nebulin-related anchoring protein gene (NRAP) were identified in a few patients with sporadic DCM. Methods and results We determined the frequency of rare NRAP variants in a cohort of DCM patients and control patients to further evaluate role of this gene in cardiomyopathies. A retrospective analysis of our internal variant database consisting of 31,639 individuals who underwent genetic testing (either panel or direct exome sequencing) was performed. The DCM group included 577 patients with either a confirmed or suspected DCM diagnosis. A control cohort of 31,062 individuals, including 25,912 individuals with non-cardiac (control group) and 5,150 with non-DCM cardiac indications (Non-DCM cardiac group). Biallelic (n = 6) or two (n = 5) NRAP variants (two PTVs or PTV+missense) were identified in 11 unrelated probands with DCM (1.9%) but none of the controls. None of the 11 probands had an alternative molecular diagnosis. Family member testing supports co-segregation. Biallelic or potentially biallelic NRAP variants were enriched in DCM vs. controls (OR 1052, p Conclusion Loss-of-function in NRAP is a cause for autosomal recessive dilated cardiomyopathy, supporting its inclusion in comprehensive genetic testing.
  • Zheng, GQ; Sundquist, K; Sundquist, J; Forsti, A; Hemminki, O; Hemminki, K (2021)
    Background Previous population-based studies on second primary cancers (SPCs) in urothelial cancers have focused on known risk factors in bladder cancer patients without data on other urothelial sites of the renal pelvis or ureter. Aims To estimate sex-specific risks for any SPCs after urothelial cancers, and in reverse order, for urothelial cancers as SPCs after any cancer. Such two-way analysis may help interpret the results. Methods We employed standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) to estimate bidirectional relative risks of subsequent cancer associated with urothelial cancers. Patient data were obtained from the Swedish Cancer Registry from years 1990 through 2015. Results We identified 46 234 urinary bladder cancers (75% male), 940 ureteral cancers (60% male), and 2410 renal pelvic cancers (57% male). After male bladder cancer, SIRs significantly increased for 9 SPCs, most for ureteral (SIR 41.9) and renal pelvic (17.2) cancers. In the reversed order (bladder cancer as SPC), 10 individual FPCs were associated with an increased risk; highest associations were noted after renal pelvic (21.0) and ureteral (20.9) cancers. After female bladder cancer, SIRs of four SPCs were significantly increased, most for ureteral (87.8) and pelvic (35.7) cancers. Female bladder, ureteral, and pelvic cancers associated are with endometrial cancer. Conclusions The risks of recurrent urothelial cancers were very high, and, at most sites, female risks were twice over the male risks. Risks persisted often to follow-up periods of >5 years, motivating an extended patient follow-up. Lynch syndrome-related cancers were associated with particularly female urothelial cancers, calling for clinical vigilance.
  • Tosetto, Alberto; Badiee, Zahra; Baghaipour, Mohammad-Reza; Baronciani, Luciano; Battle, Javier; Berntorp, Erik; Bodo, Imre; Budde, Ulrich; Castaman, Giancarlo; Eikenboom, Jeroen C. J.; Eshghi, Peyman; Ettorre, Cosimo; Goodeve, Anne; Goudemand, Jenny; Richard, Charles; Hay, Morris; Hoorfar, Hamid; Karimi, Mehran; Keikhaei, Bijan; Lassila, Riitta; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Fernandez, Maria Fernanda Lopez; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Morfini, Massimo; Oldenburg, Johannes; Peake, Ian; Lopez, Rafael Parra; Peyvandi, Flora; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Tiede, Andreas; Toogeh, Gholamreza; Trossaert, Marc; Zekavat, Omidreza; Zetterberg, Eva M. K.; Federici, Augusto B. (2020)
    Background Type 3 von Willebrand's disease (VWD) patients present markedly reduced levels of von Willebrand factor and factor VIII. Because of its rarity, the bleeding phenotype of type 3 VWD is poorly described, as compared to type 1 VWD. Aims To evaluate the frequency and the severity of bleeding symptoms across age and sex groups in type 3 patients and to compare these with those observed in type 1 VWD patients to investigate any possible clustering of bleeding symptoms within type 3 patients. Methods We compared the bleeding phenotype and computed the bleeding score (BS) using the MCMDM-1VWD bleeding questionnaire in patients enrolled in the 3WINTERS-IPS and MCMDM-1VWD studies. Results In 223 unrelated type 3 VWD patients, both the BS and the number of clinically relevant bleeding symptoms were increased in type 3 as compared to type 1 VWD patients (15 versus 6 and 5 versus 3). Intracranial bleeding, oral cavity, hemarthroses, and deep hematomas were at least five-fold over-represented in type 3 VWD. A more severe bleeding phenotype was evident in patients having von Willebrand factor antigen levels <20 IU/dL at diagnosis in the two merged cohorts. In type 3 patients, there was an apparent clustering of hemarthrosis with gastrointestinal bleeding and epistaxis, whereas bleeding after surgery or tooth extraction clusters with oral bleeding and menorrhagia. Conclusions In the largest cohort of type 3 VWD patients, we were able to describe a distinct clinical phenotype that is associated with the presence of a more severe hemostatic defect.
  • Nygaard, Malene; Kemppainen, Petri; Speed, James D. M.; Elven, Reidar; Flatberg, Kjell Ivar; Galten, Leif P.; Yousefi, Narjes; Solstad, Heidi; Bendiksby, Mika (2021)
    Carex section Ceratocystis (Cyperaceae) is a group of recently evolved plant species, in which hybridization is frequent, introgression is documented, taxonomy is complex, and morphological boundaries are vague. Within this section, a unified taxonomic treatment of the Carex jemtlandica-Carex lepidocarpa species complex does not exist, and Norway may currently be the sole country accepting species rank for both. Carex jemtlandica is mainly confined to Fennoscandia and is thus a Fennoscandian conservation responsibility. This motivated us to test the principal hypothesis that both C. jemtlandica and C. lepidocarpa represent evolutionary significant units, and that both deserve their current recognition at species level. We investigated their evolutionary distinctiveness in Norway, using restriction site-associated DNA sequencing and ecological niche modeling. Our genomic results reveal two genetic clusters, largely corresponding to C. jemtlandica and C. lepidocarpa that also remain distinct in sympatry, despite clear indications of ongoing hybridization and introgression. The ecological niche modeling suggests that they occupy different environmental niches. Jointly, our results clearly show that C. jemtlandica and C. lepidocarpa represent separately evolving entities that should qualify recognition as evolutionary significant units. Given the high level of introgression compared to other hybridizing species pairs in Carex we recommend treating C. jemtlandica as a subspecies of C. lepidocarpa.
  • Int Bilateral-Pheochromocytoma-Reg; Neumann, Hartmut P. H.; Tsoy, Uliana; Bancos, Irina; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Eng, Charis (2019)
    IMPORTANCE Large studies investigating long-term outcomes of patients with bilateral pheochromocytomas treated with either total or cortical-sparing adrenalectomies are needed to inform clinical management. OBJECTIVE To determine the association of total vs cortical-sparing adrenalectomy with pheochromocytoma-specific mortality, the burden of primary adrenal insufficiency after bilateral adrenalectomy, and the risk of pheochromocytoma recurrence. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This cohort study used data from a multicenter consortium-based registry for 625 patients treated for bilateral pheochromocytomas between 1950 and 2018. Data were analyzed from September 1, 2018, to June 1, 2019. EXPOSURES Total or cortical-sparing adrenalectomy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary adrenal insufficiency, recurrent pheochromocytoma, and mortality. RESULTS Of 625 patients (300 [48%] female) with a median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 30 (22-40) years at diagnosis, 401 (64%) were diagnosed with synchronous bilateral pheochromocytomas and 224 (36%) were diagnosed with metachronous pheochromocytomas (median [IQR] interval to second adrenalectomy, 6 [1-13] years). In 505 of 526 tested patients (96%), germline mutationswere detected in the genes RET (282 patients [54%]), VHL (184 patients [35%]), and other genes (39 patients [7%]). Of 849 adrenalectomies performed in 625 patients, 324 (52%) were planned as cortical sparing and were successful in 248 of 324 patients (76.5%). Primary adrenal insufficiency occurred in all patients treated with total adrenalectomy but only in 23.5% of patients treated with attempted cortical-sparing adrenalectomy. A third of patients with adrenal insufficiency developed complications, such as adrenal crisis or iatrogenic Cushing syndrome. Of 377 patients who became steroid dependent, 67 (18%) developed at least 1 adrenal crisis and 50 (13%) developed iatrogenic Cushing syndrome during median (IQR) follow-up of 8 (3-25) years. Two patients developed recurrent pheochromocytoma in the adrenal bed despite total adrenalectomy. In contrast, 33 patients (13%) treated with successful cortical-sparing adrenalectomy developed another pheochromocytoma within the remnant adrenal after a median (IQR) of 8 (4-13) years, all of which were successfully treated with another surgery. Cortical-sparing surgery was not associated with survival. Overall survivalwas associated with comorbidities unrelated to pheochromocytoma: of 63 patients who died, only 3 (5%) died of metastatic pheochromocytoma. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Patients undergoing cortical-sparing adrenalectomy did not demonstrate decreased survival, despite development of recurrent pheochromocytoma in 13%. Cortical-sparing adrenalectomy should be considered in all patients with hereditary pheochromocytoma.
  • Castel, Guillaume; Couteaudier, Mathilde; Sauvage, Frank; Pons, Jean-Baptiste; Murri, Severine; Plyusnina, Angelina; Pontier, Dominique; Cosson, Jean-Francois; Plyusnin, Alexander; Marianneau, Philippe; Tordo, Noel (2015)
    Puumala virus (PUUV) is the agent of nephropathia epidemica (NE), a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Europe. NE incidence presents a high spatial variation throughout France, while the geographical distribution of the wild reservoir of PUUV, the bank vole, is rather continuous. A missing piece of the puzzle is the current distribution and the genetic variation of PUUV in France, which has been overlooked until now and remains poorly understood. During a population survey, from 2008 to 2011, bank voles were trapped in eight different forests of France located in areas known to be endemic for NE or in area from where no NE case has been reported until now. Bank voles were tested for immunoglobulin (Ig)G ELISA serology and two seropositive animals for each of three different areas (Ardennes, Jura and Orleans) were then subjected to laboratory analyses in order to sequence the whole S, M and L segments of PUUV. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that French PUUV isolates globally belong to the central European (CE) lineage although isolates from Ardennes are clearly distinct from those in Jura and Orleans, suggesting a different evolutionary history and origin of PUUV introduction in France. Sequence analyses revealed specific amino acid signatures along the N protein, including in PUUV from the Orleans region from where NE in humans has never been reported. The relevance of these mutations in term of pathophysiology is discussed.
  • Kurki, Mitja I.; Saarentaus, Elmo Christian; Pietiläinen, Olli; Gormley, Padraigh; Lal, Dennis; Kerminen, Sini; Torniainen-Holm, Minna; Hämäläinen, Eija; Rahikkala, Elisa; Keski-Filppula, Riikka; Rauhala, Merja; Korpi-Heikkila, Satu; Komulainen-Ebrahim, Jonna; Helander, Heli; Vieira, Päivi; Männikkö, Minna; Peltonen, Markku; Havulinna, Aki; Salomaa, Veikko; Pirinen, Matti; Suvisaari, Jaana; Moilanen, Jukka S.; Körkkö, Jarmo; Kuismin, Outi; Daly, Mark; Palotie, Aarno (2019)
    The contribution of de novo variants in severe intellectual disability (ID) has been extensively studied whereas the genetics of mild ID has been less characterized. To elucidate the genetics of milder ID we studied 442 ID patients enriched for mild ID (>50%) from a population isolate of Finland. Using exome sequencing, we show that rare damaging variants in known ID genes are observed significantly more often in severe (27%) than in mild ID (13%) patients. We further observe a significant enrichment of functional variants in genes not yet associated with ID (OR: 2.1). We show that a common variant polygenic risk significantly contributes to ID. The heritability explained by polygenic risk score is the highest for educational attainment (EDU) in mild ID (2.2%) but lower for more severe ID (0.6%). Finally, we identify a Finland enriched homozygote variant in the CRADD ID associated gene.
  • Surendran, Praveen; Feofanova, Elena; Lahrouchi, Najim; Ntalla, Ioanna; Karthikeyan, Savita; Cook, James; Chen, Lingyan; Mifsud, Borbala; Yao, Chen; Kraja, Aldi T.; Cartwright, James H.; Hellwege, Jacklyn N.; Giri, Ayush; Tragante, Vinicius; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Liu, Dajiang J.; Prins, Bram P.; Stewart, Isobel D.; Cabrera, Claudia P.; Eales, James M.; Akbarov, Artur; Auer, Paul L.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Bis, Joshua C.; Braithwaite, Vickie S.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Daw, E. Warwick; Warren, Helen R.; Drenos, Fotios; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Faul, Jessica D.; Fauman, Eric B.; Fava, Cristiano; Ferreira, Teresa; Foley, Christopher N.; Franceschini, Nora; Gao, He; Giannakopoulou, Olga; Giulianini, Franco; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Guo, Xiuqing; Harris, Sarah E.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Helgadottir, Anna; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kontto, Jukka; Larson, Martin G.; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lindström, Jaana; Lotta, Luca A.; Lu, Yingchang; Luan, Jian'an; Mahajan, Anubha; Malerba, Giovanni; Masca, Nicholas G. D.; Mei, Hao; Menni, Cristina; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Mosen-Ansorena, David; Muller-Nurasyid, Martina; Pare, Guillaume; Paul, Dirk S.; Perola, Markus; Poveda, Alaitz; Rauramaa, Rainer; Richard, Melissa; Richardson, Tom G.; Sepulveda, Nuno; Sim, Xueling; Smith, Albert; Smith, Jennifer A.; Staley, James R.; Stanakova, Alena; Sulem, Patrick; Theriault, Sebastien; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Trompet, Stella; Varga, Tibor V.; Edwards, Digna R. Velez; Veronesi, Giovanni; Weiss, Stefan; Willems, Sara M.; Yao, Jie; Young, Robin; Yu, Bing; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing-Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Wei; Evangelou, Evangelos; Aeschbacher, Stefanie; Asllanaj, Eralda; Blankenberg, Stefan; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Braund, Peter S.; Burgess, Stephen; Cho, Kelly; Christensen, Cramer; Connell, John; de Mutsert, Renee; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Dorr, Marcus; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Gaziano, J. Michael; Grarup, Niels; Grove, Megan L.; Hallmans, Goran; Hansen, Torben; Have, Christian T.; Heiss, Gerardo; Jorgensen, Marit E.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kajantie, Eero; Kamat, Mihir; Karajamaki, AnneMari; Karpe, Fredrik; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lannfelt, Lars; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Linneberg, Allan; Martin, Lisa W.; Moitry, Marie; Nadkarni, Girish; Neville, Matt J.; Palmer, Colin N. 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F.; Witte, Daniel R.; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Zhang, He; Aliya, Naheed; Almgren, Peter; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Barnes, Michael R.; Blakemore, Alexandra; Boehnke, Michael; Bots, Michiel L.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Buring, Julie E.; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Conen, David; Correa, Adolfo; Smith, George Davey; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrieres, Jean; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Franks, Paul W.; Franks, Stephen; Frossard, Philippe; Gambaro, Giovanni; Gaunt, Tom R.; Groop, Leif; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Hennig, Branwen J.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Ingelsson, Erik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kee, Frank; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Launer, Lenore J.; Lind, Lars; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Majumder, Abdulla Al Shafi; Laakso, Markku; McCarthy, Mark; Melander, Olle; Mohlke, Karen L.; Murray, Alison D.; Nordestgaard, Borge Gronne; Orho-Melander, Marju; Packard, Chris J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmas, Walter; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David J.; Prentice, Andrew M.; Province, Michael A.; Relton, Caroline L.; Rice, Kenneth; Ridker, Paul M.; Rolandsson, Olov; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Rotter, Jerome; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sattar, Naveed; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Smith, Blair H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Starr, John M.; Sebert, Sylvain; Taylor, Kent D.; Lakka, Timo A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Meer, Peter; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Verweij, Niek; Virtamo, Jarmo; Volker, Uwe; Weir, David R.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Charchar, Fadi J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Butterworth, Adam S.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Danesh, John; Edwards, Todd L.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Adriana M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Liu, Chunyu; Manning, Alisa K.; Morris, Andrew P.; Morrison, Alanna C.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Saleheen, Danish; Stefansson, Kari; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chasman, Daniel; Levy, Daniel; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Munroe, Patricia B.; Howson, Joanna M. M. (2020)
    Genetic studies of blood pressure (BP) to date have mainly analyzed common variants (minor allele frequency > 0.05). In a meta-analysis of up to similar to 1.3 million participants, we discovered 106 new BP-associated genomic regions and 87 rare (minor allele frequency
  • Heliö, Krista; Kangas-Kontio, Tiia; Weckström, Sini; Vanninen, Sari U. M.; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Myllykangas, Samuel; Heliö, Tiina M.; Koskenvuo, Juha W. (2020)
    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a condition characterized by dilatation and systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle in the absence of severe coronary artery disease or abnormal loading conditions. Mutations in the titin (TTN) and lamin A/C (LMNA) genes are the two most significant contributors in familial DCM. Previously mutations in the desmoplakin (DSP) gene have been associated with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and more recently with DCM. Methods We describe the cardiac phenotype related to a DSP mutation which was identified in ten unrelated Finnish index patients using next-generation sequencing. Sanger sequencing was used to verify the presence of this DSP variant in the probands' relatives. Medical records were obtained, and clinical evaluation was performed. Results We identified DSP c.6310delA, p.(Thr2104Glnfs*12) variant in 17 individuals of which 11 (65%) fulfilled the DCM diagnostic criteria. This pathogenic variant presented with left ventricular dilatation, dysfunction and major ventricular arrhythmias. Two patients showed late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and myocardial edema on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may suggest inflammatory process at myocardium. Conclusions The patients diagnosed with DCM showed an arrhythmogenic phenotype as well as SCD at young age supporting the recently proposed concept of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. This study also demonstrates relatively low penetrance of truncating DSP variant in the probands' family members by the age of 40. Further studies are needed to elucidate the possible relations between myocardial inflammation and pathogenic DSP variants.