Browsing by Subject "GLIOMA-CELLS"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-3 of 3
  • Väyrynen, Otto; Piippo, Markku; Jämsä, Hannaleena; Väisänen, Tuomas; de Almeida, Carlos E. B.; Salo, Tuula; Missailidis, Sotiris; Risteli, Maija (2018)
    Chemoradiation is an established approach in the treatment of advanced oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC), but therapy may cause severe side-effects due to signal interchanges between carcinoma and the tumour microenvironment (TME). In this study, we examined the potential use of our human 3D myoma disc and Myogel models in in vitro chemoradiation studies by analysing the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) and the combined effect of heparanase 1 (HPSE1) inhibitors and IR on OTSCC cell proliferation, invasion and MMP-2 and - 9 production. Finally, we analysed the long-term effects of IR by studying clones of previously irradiated and invaded HSC-3 cells. We found that in both human uterine leiomyoma-based extracellular matrix models IR inhibited the invasion of HSC-3 cells, but blocking HPSE1 activity combined with IR induced their invasion. Low doses of IR increased MMP expression and initiated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cells cultured on myoma discs. We conclude that myoma models offer consistent methods for testing human carcinoma cell invasion and phenotypic changes during chemoradiation treatment. In addition, we showed that IR had long-term effects on MMP-2 and - 9, which might elicit different HSC-3 invasion responses when cells were under the challenge of HPSE1 inhibitors and IR.
  • Gerasymchuk, Dmytro; Hubiernatorova, Anastasiia; Domanskyi, Andrii (2020)
    The cytoskeleton is one of the most mobile and complex cell structures. It is involved in cellular transport, cell division, cell shape formation and adaptation in response to extra- and intracellular stimuli, endo- and exocytosis, migration, and invasion. These processes are crucial for normal cellular physiology and are affected in several pathological processes, including neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Some proteins, participating in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), play an important role in actin cytoskeleton reorganization, and formation of invadopodia in cancer cells and are also deregulated in neurodegenerative disorders. However, there is still limited information about the factors contributing to the regulation of their expression. MicroRNAs are potent negative regulators of gene expression mediating crosstalk between different cellular pathways in cellular homeostasis and stress responses. These molecules regulate numerous genes involved in neuronal differentiation, plasticity, and degeneration. Growing evidence suggests the role of microRNAs in the regulation of endocytosis, cell motility, and invasiveness. By modulating the levels of such microRNAs, it may be possible to interfere with CME or other processes to normalize their function. In malignancy, the role of microRNAs is undoubtful, and therefore changing their levels can attenuate the carcinogenic process. Here we review the current advances in our understanding of microRNAs regulating actin cytoskeleton dynamics, CME and cell motility with a special focus on neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. We investigate whether current literature provides an evidence that microRNA-mediated regulation of essential cellular processes, such as CME and cell motility, is conserved in neurons, and cancer cells. We argue that more research effort should be addressed to study the neuron-specific functions on microRNAs. Disease-associated microRNAs affecting essential cellular processes deserve special attention both from the view of fundamental science and as future neurorestorative or anti-cancer therapies.
  • Li, Li; Hu, Yizhou; Ylivinkka, Irene; Li, Huini; Chen, Ping; Keski-Oja, Jorma; Hyytiäinen, Marko (2013)