Browsing by Subject "GROSS PRIMARY PRODUCTION"

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  • Makela, Jarmo; Susiluoto, Jouni; Markkanen, Tiina; Aurela, Mika; Järvinen, Heikki; Mammarella, Ivan; Hagemann, Stefan; Aalto, Tuula (2016)
    We examined parameter optimisation in the JSBACH (Kaminski et al., 2013; Knorr and Kattge, 2005; Reick et al., 2013) ecosystem model, applied to two boreal forest sites (Hyytiala and Sodankyla) in Finland. We identified and tested key parameters in soil hydrology and forest water and carbon-exchange-related formulations, and optimised them using the adaptive Metropolis (AM) algorithm for Hyytil with a 5-year calibration period (2000-2004) followed by a 4-year validation period (2005-2008). Sodankyla acted as an independent validation site, where optimisations were not made. The tuning provided estimates for full distribution of possible parameters, along with information about correlation, sensitivity and identifiability. Some parameters were correlated with each other due to a phenomenological connection between carbon uptake and water stress or other connections due to the set-up of the model formulations. The latter holds especially for vegetation phenology parameters. The least identifiable parameters include phenology parameters, parameters connecting relative humidity and soil dryness, and the field capacity of the skin reservoir. These soil parameters were masked by the large contribution from vegetation transpiration. In addition to leaf area index and the maximum carboxylation rate, the most effective parameters adjusting the gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET) fluxes in seasonal tuning were related to soil wilting point, drainage and moisture stress imposed on vegetation. For daily and half-hourly tunings the most important parameters were the ratio of leaf internal CO2 concentration to external CO2 and the parameter connecting relative humidity and soil dryness. Effectively the seasonal tuning transferred water from soil moisture into ET, and daily and half-hourly tunings reversed this process. The seasonal tuning improved the month-to-month development of GPP and ET, and produced the most stable estimates of water use efficiency. When compared to the seasonal tuning, the daily tuning is worse on the seasonal scale. However, daily parametrisation reproduced the observations for average diurnal cycle best, except for the GPP for Sodankyla validation period, where half-hourly tuned parameters were better. In general, the daily tuning provided the largest reduction in model-data mismatch. The models response to drought was unaffected by our parametrisations and further studies are needed into enhancing the dry response in JSBACH.
  • Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Makela, Annikki; Fronzek, Stefan; Minunno, Francesco; Peltoniemi, Mikko (2018)
    We are bound to large uncertainties when considering impacts of climate change on forest productivity. Studies formally acknowledging and determining the relative importance of different sources of this uncertainty are still scarce, although the choice of the climate scenario, and e.g. the assumption of the CO2 effects on tree water use can easily result in contradicting conclusions of future forest productivity. In a large scale, forest productivity is primarily driven by two large fluxes, gross primary production (GPP), which is the source for all carbon in forest ecosystems, and heterotrophic respiration. Here we show how uncertainty of GPP projections of Finnish boreal forests divides between input, mechanistic and parametric uncertainty. We used the simple semi-empirical stand GPP and water balance model PRELES with an ensemble of downscaled global circulation model (GCM) projections for the 21st century under different emissions and forcing scenarios (both RCP and SRES). We also evaluated the sensitivity of assumptions of the relationships between atmospheric CO2 concentration (C-a), photosynthesis and water use of trees. Even mean changes in climate projections of different meteorological variables for Finland were so high that it is likely that the primary productivity of forests will increase by the end of the century. The scale of productivity change largely depends on the long-term C-a fertilization effect on GPP and transpiration. However, GCM variability was the major source of uncertainty until 2060, after which emission scenario/pathway became the dominant factor. Large uncertainties with a wide range of projections can make it more difficult to draw ecologically meaningful conclusions especially on the local to regional scales, yet a thorough assessment of uncertainties is important for drawing robust conclusions.
  • Nichol, Caroline J.; Drolet, Guillaume; Porcar-Castell, Albert; Wade, Tom; Sabater, Neus; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; MacLellan, Chris; Levula, Janne; Mammarella, Ivan; Vesala, Timo; Atherton, Jon (2019)
    Solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence has been shown to be increasingly an useful proxy for the estimation of gross primary productivity (GPP), at a range of spatial scales. Here, we explore the seasonality in a continuous time series of canopy solar induced fluorescence (hereafter SiF) and its relation to canopy gross primary production (GPP), canopy light use efficiency (LUE), and direct estimates of leaf level photochemical efficiency in an evergreen canopy. SiF was calculated using infilling in two bands from the incoming and reflected radiance using a pair of Ocean Optics USB2000+ spectrometers operated in a dual field of view mode, sampling at a 30 min time step using custom written automated software, from early spring through until autumn in 2011. The optical system was mounted on a tower of 18 m height adjacent to an eddy covariance system, to observe a boreal forest ecosystem dominated by Scots pine. (Pinus sylvestris) A Walz MONITORING-PAM, multi fluorimeter system, was simultaneously mounted within the canopy adjacent to the footprint sampled by the optical system. Following correction of the SiF data for O-2 and structural effects, SiF, SiF yield, LUE, the photochemicsl reflectance index (PRI), and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) exhibited a seasonal pattern that followed GPP sampled by the eddy covariance system. Due to the complexities of solar azimuth and zenith angle (SZA) over the season on the SiF signal, correlations between SiF, SiF yield, GPP, and LUE were assessed on SZA <50 degrees and under strictly clear sky conditions. Correlations found, even under these screened scenarios, resulted around similar to r(2) = 0.3. The diurnal responses of SiF, SiF yield, PAM estimates of effective quantum yield (Delta F/Delta F-m(')), and meteorological parameters demonstrated some agreement over the diurnal cycle. The challenges inherent in SiF retrievals in boreal evergreen ecosystems are discussed.
  • Zhang, Chao; Atherton, Jon; Penuelas, Josep; Filella, Iolanda; Kolari, Pasi; Aalto, Juho; Ruhanen, Hanna; Back, Jaana; Porcar-Castell, Albert (2019)
    Chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF) is closely related to photosynthesis and can be measured remotely using multiple spectral features as solar-induced fluorescence (SIF). In boreal regions, SIF shows particular promise as an indicator of photosynthesis, in part because of the limited variation of seasonal light absorption in these ecosystems. Seasonal spectral changes in ChlF could yield new information on processes such as sustained nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ(S)) but also disrupt the relationship between SIF and photosynthesis. We followed ChlF and functional and biochemical properties of Pinus sylvestris needles during the photosynthetic spring recovery period to answer the following: (a) How ChlF spectra change over seasonal timescales? (b) How pigments, NPQ(S), and total photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorption drive changes of ChlF spectra? (c) Do all ChlF wavelengths track photosynthetic seasonality? We found seasonal ChlF variation in the red and far-red wavelengths, which was strongly correlated with NPQ(S), carotenoid content, and photosynthesis (enhanced in the red), but not with PAR absorption. Furthermore, a rapid decrease in red/far-red ChlF ratio occurred in response to a cold spell, potentially relating to the structural reorganization of the photosystems. We conclude that all current SIF retrieval features can track seasonal photosynthetic dynamics in boreal evergreens, but the full SIF spectra provides additional insight.
  • Holmberg, Maria; Aalto, Tuula; Akujarvi, Anu; Arslan, Ali Nadir; Bergstrom, Irina; Bottcher, Kristin; Lahtinen, Ismo; Makela, Annikki; Markkanen, Tiina; Minunno, Francesco; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Rankinen, Katri; Vihervaara, Petteri; Forsius, Martin (2019)
    Forests regulate climate, as carbon, water and nutrient fluxes are modified by physiological processes of vegetation and soil. Forests also provide renewable raw material, food, and recreational possibilities. Rapid climate warming projected for the boreal zone may change the provision of these ecosystem services. We demonstrate model based estimates of present and future ecosystem services related to carbon cycling of boreal forests. The services were derived from biophysical variables calculated by two dynamic models. Future changes in the biophysical variables were driven by climate change scenarios obtained as results of a sample of global climate models downscaled for Finland, assuming three future pathways of radiative forcing. We introduce continuous monitoring on phenology to be used in model parametrization through a webcam network with automated image processing features. In our analysis, climate change impacts on key boreal forest ecosystem services are both beneficial and detrimental. Our results indicate an increase in annual forest growth of about 60% and an increase in annual carbon sink of roughly 40% from the reference period (1981-2010) to the end of the century. The vegetation active period was projected to start about 3 weeks earlier and end ten days later by the end of the century compared to currently. We found a risk for increasing drought, and a decrease in the number of soil frost days. Our results show a considerable uncertainty in future provision of boreal forest ecosystem services.
  • Porcar-Castell, A.; Mac Arthur, A.; Rossini, M.; Eklundh, L.; Pacheco-Labrador, J.; Anderson, K.; Balzarolo, M.; Martin, M. P.; Jin, H.; Tomelleri, E.; Cerasoli, S.; Sakowska, K.; Hueni, A.; Julitta, T.; Nichol, C. J.; Vescovo, L. (2015)
    Resolving the spatial and temporal dynamics of gross primary productivity (GPP) of terrestrial ecosystems across different scales remains a challenge. Remote sensing is regarded as the solution to upscale point observations conducted at the ecosystem level, using the eddy covariance (EC) technique, to the landscape and global levels. In addition to traditional vegetation indices, the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) and the emission of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF), now measurable from space, provide a new range of opportunities to monitor the global carbon cycle using remote sensing. However, the scale mismatch between EC observations and the much coarser satellite-derived data complicate the integration of the two sources of data. The solution is to establish a network of in situ spectral measurements that can act as a bridge between EC measurements and remote-sensing data. In situ spectral measurements have already been conducted for many years at EC sites, but using variable instrumentation, setups, and measurement standards. In Europe in particular, in situ spectral measurements remain highly heterogeneous. The goal of EUROSPEC Cost Action ES0930 was to promote the development of common measuring protocols and new instruments towards establishing best practices and standardization of these measurements. In this review we describe the background and main tradeoffs of in situ spectral measurements, review the main results of EUROSPEC Cost Action, and discuss the future challenges and opportunities of in situ spectral measurements for improved estimation of local and global estimates of GPP over terrestrial ecosystems.
  • Tian, Xianglin; Minunno, Francesco; Cao, Tianjian; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Mäkelä, Annikki (2020)
    Abstract Applications of ecosystem flux models on large geographical scales are often limited by model complexity and data availability. Here, we calibrated and evaluated a semi-empirical ecosystem flux model, PRELES, for various forest types and climate conditions, based on eddy covariance data from 55 sites. A Bayesian approach was adopted for model calibration and uncertainty quantification. We applied the site-specific calibrations and multisite calibrations to nine plant functional types (PFTs) to obtain the site-specific and PFT specific parameter vectors for PRELES. A systematically designed cross-validation was implemented to evaluate calibration strategies and the risks in extrapolation. The combination of plant physiological traits and climate patterns generated significant variation in vegetation responses and model parameters across but not within PFTs, implying that applying the model without PFT-specific parameters is risky. But within PFT, the multisite calibrations performed as accurately as the site-specific calibrations in predicting gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET). Moreover, the variations among sites within one PFT could be effectively simulated by simply adjusting the parameter of potential light-use efficiency (LUE), implying significant convergence of simulated vegetation processes within PFT. The hierarchical modelling of PRELES provides a compromise between satellite-driven LUE and physiologically oriented approaches for extrapolating the geographical variation of ecosystem productivity. Although measurement errors of eddy covariance and remotely sensed data propagated a substantial proportion of uncertainty or potential biases, the results illustrated that PRELES could reliably capture daily variations of GPP and ET for contrasting forest types on large geographical scales if PFT-specific parameterizations were applied.
  • Musavi, Talie; Migliavacca, Mirco; van de Weg, Martine Janet; Kattge, Jens; Wohlfahrt, Georg; van Bodegom, Peter M.; Reichstein, Markus; Bahn, Michael; Carrara, Arnaud; Domingues, Tomas F.; Gavazzi, Michael; Gianelle, Damiano; Gimeno, Cristina; Granier, Andre; Gruening, Carsten; Havrankova, Katerina; Herbst, Mathias; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Kalhori, Aram; Kaminski, Thomas; Klumpp, Katja; Kolari, Pasi; Longdoz, Bernard; Minerbi, Stefano; Montagnani, Leonardo; Moors, Eddy; Oechel, Walter C.; Reich, Peter B.; Rohatyn, Shani; Rossi, Alessandra; Rotenberg, Eyal; Varlagin, Andrej; Wilkinson, Matthew; Wirth, Christian; Mahecha, Miguel D. (2016)
    The aim of this study was to systematically analyze the potential and limitations of using plant functional trait observations from global databases versus in situ data to improve our understanding of vegetation impacts on ecosystem functional properties (EFPs). Using ecosystem photosynthetic capacity as an example, we first provide an objective approach to derive robust EFP estimates from gross primary productivity (GPP) obtained from eddy covariance flux measurements. Second, we investigate the impact of synchronizing EFPs and plant functional traits in time and space to evaluate their relationships, and the extent to which we can benefit from global plant trait databases to explain the variability of ecosystem photosynthetic capacity. Finally, we identify a set of plant functional traits controlling ecosystem photosynthetic capacity at selected sites. Suitable estimates of the ecosystem photosynthetic capacity can be derived from light response curve of GPP responding to radiation (photosynthetically active radiation or absorbed photosynthetically active radiation). Although the effect of climate is minimized in these calculations, the estimates indicate substantial interannual variation of the photosynthetic capacity, even after removing site-years with confounding factors like disturbance such as fire events. The relationships between foliar nitrogen concentration and ecosystem photosynthetic capacity are tighter when both of the measurements are synchronized in space and time. When using multiple plant traits simultaneously as predictors for ecosystem photosynthetic capacity variation, the combination of leaf carbon to nitrogen ratio with leaf phosphorus content explains the variance of ecosystem photosynthetic capacity best (adjusted R-2 = 0.55). Overall, this study provides an objective approach to identify links between leaf level traits and canopy level processes and highlights the relevance of the dynamic nature of ecosystems. Synchronizing measurements of eddy covariance fluxes and plant traits in time and space is shown to be highly relevant to better understand the importance of intra-and interspecific trait variation on ecosystem functioning.
  • Hari, Pertti; Noe, Steffen; Dengel, Sigrid; Elbers, Jan; Gielen, Bert; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kruijt, Bart; Kulmala, Liisa; Lindroth, Anders; Mammarella, Ivan; Petaja, Tuukka; Schurgers, Guy; Vanhatalo, Anni; Kulmala, Markku; Back, Jaana (2018)
    Photosynthesis provides carbon for the synthesis of macromolecules to construct cells during growth. This is the basis for the key role of photosynthesis in the carbon dynamics of ecosystems and in the biogenic CO2 assimilation. The development of eddy-covariance (EC) measurements for ecosystem CO2 fluxes started a new era in the field studies of photosynthesis. However, the interpretation of the very variable CO2 fluxes in evergreen forests has been problematic especially in transition times such as the spring and autumn. We apply two theoretical needle-level equations that connect the variation in the light intensity, stomatal action and the annual metabolic cycle of photosynthesis. We then use these equations to predict the photosynthetic CO2 flux in five Scots pine stands located from the northern timberline to Central Europe. Our result has strong implications for our conceptual understanding of the effects of the global change on the processes in boreal forests, especially of the changes in the metabolic annual cycle of photosynthesis.
  • Zhang, Zhaoying; Zhang, Yongguang; Porcar-Castell, Albert; Joiner, Joanna; Guanter, Luis; Yang, Xi; Migliavacca, Mirco; Ju, Weimin; Sun, Zhigang; Chen, Shiping; Martini, David; Zhang, Qian; Li, Zhaohui; Cleverly, James; Wang, Hezhou; Goulas, Yves (2020)
    Quantifying global photosynthesis remains a challenge due to a lack of accurate remote sensing proxies. Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) has been shown to be a good indicator of photosynthetic activity across various spatial scales. However, a global and spatially challenging estimate of terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) based on satellite SIF remains unresolved due to the confounding effects of species-specific physical and physiological traits and external factors, such as canopy structure or photosynthetic pathway (C-3 or C-4). Here we analyze an ensemble of far-red SIF data from OCO-2 satellite and ground observations at multiple sites, using the spectral invariant theory to reduce the effects of canopy structure and to retrieve a structure-corrected total canopy SIF emission (SIFtotal). We find that the relationships between observed canopy-leaving SIF and ecosystem GPP vary significantly among biomes. In contrast, the relationships between SIFtotal and GPP converge around two unique models, one for C-3 and one for C-4 plants. We show that the two single empirical models can be used to globally scale satellite SIF observations to terrestrial GPP. We obtain an independent estimate of global terrestrial GPP of 129.56 +/- 6.54 PgC/year for the 2015-2017 period, which is consistent with the state-of-the-art data- and process-oriented models. The new GPP product shows improved sensitivity to previously undetected 'hotspots' of productivity, being able to resolve the double-peak in GPP due to rotational cropping systems. We suggest that the direct scheme to estimate GPP presented here, which is based on satellite SIF, may open up new possibilities to resolve the dynamics of global terrestrial GPP across space and time.
  • Whelan, Mary E.; Lennartz, Sinikka T.; Gimeno, Teresa E.; Wehr, Richard; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Wang, Yuting; Kooijmans, Linda M. J.; Hilton, Timothy W.; Belviso, Sauveur; Peylin, Philippe; Commane, Roisin; Sun, Wu; Chen, Huilin; Kuai, Le; Mammarella, Ivan; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Berkelhammer, Max; Li, King-Fai; Yakir, Dan; Zumkehr, Andrew; Katayama, Yoko; Ogee, Jerome; Spielmann, Felix M.; Kitz, Florian; Rastogi, Bharat; Kesselmeier, Juergen; Marshall, Julia; Erkkilä, Kukka-Maaria; Wingate, Lisa; Meredith, Laura K.; He, Wei; Bunk, Ruediger; Launois, Thomas; Vesala, Timo; Schmidt, Johan A.; Fichot, Cedric G.; Seibt, Ulli; Saleska, Scott; Saltzman, Eric S.; Montzka, Stephen A.; Berry, Joseph A.; Campbell, J. Elliott (2018)
    For the past decade, observations of carbonyl sulfide (OCS or COS) have been investigated as a proxy for carbon uptake by plants. OCS is destroyed by enzymes that interact with CO2 during photosynthesis, namely carbonic anhydrase (CA) and RuBisCO, where CA is the more important one. The majority of sources of OCS to the atmosphere are geographically separated from this large plant sink, whereas the sources and sinks of CO2 are co-located in ecosystems. The drawdown of OCS can therefore be related to the uptake of CO2 without the added complication of co-located emissions comparable in magnitude. Here we review the state of our understanding of the global OCS cycle and its applications to ecosystem carbon cycle science. OCS uptake is correlated well to plant carbon uptake, especially at the regional scale. OCS can be used in conjunction with other independent measures of ecosystem function, like solar-induced fluorescence and carbon and water isotope studies. More work needs to be done to generate global coverage for OCS observations and to link this powerful atmospheric tracer to systems where fundamental questions concerning the carbon and water cycle remain.
  • Liu, Weiwei; Atherton, Jon; Mõttus, Matti; Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean-Philippe; Malenovský, Zbyněk; Raumonen, Pasi; Åkerblom, Markku; Mäkipää, Raisa; Porcar-Castell, Albert (2019)
    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) has been shown to be a suitable remote sensing proxy of photosynthesis at multiple scales. However, the relationship between fluorescence and photosynthesis observed at the leaf level cannot be directly applied to the interpretation of retrieved SIF due to the impact of canopy structure. We carried out a SIF modelling study for a heterogeneous forest canopy considering the effect of canopy structure in the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model. A 3D forest simulation scene consisting of realistic trees and understory, including multi-scale clumping at branch and canopy level, was constructed from terrestrial laser scanning data using the combined model TreeQSM and FaNNI for woody structure and leaf insertion, respectively. Next, using empirical data and a realistic range of leaf-level biochemical and physiological parameters, we conducted a local sensitivity analysis to demonstrate the potential of the approach for assessing the impact of structural, biochemical and physiological factors on top of canopy (TOC) SIF. The analysis gave insight into the factors that drive the intensity and spectral properties of TOC SIF in heterogeneous boreal forest canopies. DART simulated red TOC fluorescence was found to be less affected by biochemical factors such as chlorophyll and dry matter contents or the senescent factor than far-red fluorescence. In contrast, canopy structural factors such as overstory leaf area index (LAI), leaf angle distribution and fractional cover had a substantial and comparable impact across all SIF wavelengths, with the exception of understory LAI that affected predominantly far-red fluorescence. Finally, variations in the fluorescence quantum efficiency (Fqe) of photosystem II affected all TOC SIF wavelengths. Our results also revealed that not only canopy structural factors but also understory fluorescence should be considered in the interpretation of tower, airborne and satellite SIF datasets, especially when acquired in the (near-) nadir viewing direction and for forests with open canopies. We suggest that the modelling strategy introduced in this study, coupled with the increasing availability of TLS and other 3D data sources, can be applied to resolve the interplay between physiological, biochemical and structural factors affecting SIF across ecosystems and independently of canopy complexity, paving the way for future SIF-based 3D photosynthesis models.
  • Xu, Shan; Atherton, Jon; Riikonen, Anu; Zhang, Chao; Oivukkamaki, Jaakko; MacArthur, Alasdair; Honkavaara, Eija; Hakala, Teemu; Koivumaki, Niko; Liu, Zhigang; Porcar-Castell, Albert (2021)
    Solar-induced Fluorescence (SIF) has an advantage over greenness-based Vegetation Indices in detecting drought. This advantage is the mechanistic coupling between SIF and Gross Primary Productivity (GPP). Under water stress, SIF tends to decrease with photosynthesis, due to an increase in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), resulting in rapid and/or sustained reductions in the fluorescence quantum efficiency (phi F). Water stress also affects vegetation structure via highly dynamic changes in leaf angular distributions (LAD) or slower changes in leaf area index (LAI). Critically, these responses are entangled in space and time and their relative contribution to SIF, or to the coupling between SIF and GPP, is unclear. In this study, we quantify the relative effect of structural and photosynthetic dynamics on the diurnal and spatial variation of canopy SIF in a potato crop in response to a replicated paired-plot water stress experiment. We measured SIF using two platforms: a hydraulic lift and an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) to capture temporal and spatial variation, respectively. LAD parameters were estimated from point clouds and photographic data and used to assess structural dynamics. Leaf phi F estimated from PAM fluorescence measurements were used to represent variations in photosynthetic regulation. We also measured foliar pigments, operating quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII), photosynthetic gas exchange, stomatal conductance and LAI. We used a radiative transfer model (SCOPE) to provide a means of decoupling structural and photosynthetic factors across the diurnal and spatial domains. The results demonstrate that diurnal variation in SIF is driven by photosynthetic and structural dynamics. The influence of phi F was prominent in the diurnal SIF response to water stress, with reduced fluorescence efficiencies in stressed plants. Structural factors dominated the spatial response of SIF to water stress over and above phi F. The results showed that the relationship between SIF and GPP is maintained in response to water stress where adjustments in NPQ and leaf angle co-operate to enhance the correlation between SIF and GPP. This study points to the complexity of interpreting and modelling the spatiotemporal connection between SIF and GPP which requires simultaneous knowledge of vegetation structural and photosynthetic dynamics.
  • Collalti, A.; Marconi, S.; Ibrom, A.; Trotta, C.; Anav, A.; D'Andrea, E.; Matteucci, G.; Montagnani, L.; Gielen, B.; Mammarella, I.; Gruenwald, T.; Knohl, A.; Berninger, F.; Zhao, Y.; Valentini, R.; Santini, M. (2016)
    This study evaluates the performances of the new version (v.5.1) of 3D-CMCC Forest Ecosystem Model (FEM) in simulating gross primary productivity (GPP), against eddy covariance GPP data for 10 FLUXNET forest sites across Europe. A new carbon allocation module, coupled with new both phenological and autotrophic respiration schemes, was implemented in this new daily version. Model ability in reproducing timing and magnitude of daily and monthly GPP fluctuations is validated at intra-annual and inter-annual scale, including extreme anomalous seasons. With the purpose to test the 3D-CMCC FEM applicability over Europe without a site-related calibration, the model has been deliberately parametrized with a single set of species-specific parametrizations for each forest ecosystem. The model consistently reproduces both in timing and in magnitude daily and monthly GPP variability across all sites, with the exception of the two Mediterranean sites. We find that 3D-CMCC FEM tends to better simulate the timing of inter-annual anomalies than their magnitude within measurements' uncertainty. In six of eight sites where data are available, the model well reproduces the 2003 summer drought event. Finally, for three sites we evaluate whether a more accurate representation of forest structural characteristics (i.e. cohorts, forest layers) and species composition can improve model results. In two of the three sites results reveal that model slightly increases its performances although, statistically speaking, not in a relevant way.