Browsing by Subject "Growth and yield"

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  • Saarinen, Ninni; Kankare, Ville; Yrttimaa, Tuomas; Viljanen, Niko; Honkavaara, Eija; Holopainen, Markus; Hyyppä, Juha; Huuskonen, Saija; Hynynen, Jari; Vastaranta, Mikko (2020)
    Forest management alters the growing conditions and thus further development of trees. However, quantitative assessment of forest management on tree growth has been demanding as methodologies for capturing changes comprehensively in space and time have been lacking. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has shown to be capable of providing three-dimensional (3D) tree stem reconstructions required for revealing differences between stem shapes and sizes. In this study, we used 3D reconstructions of tree stems from TLS and an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to investigate how varying thinning treatments and the following growth effects affected stem shape and size of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees. The results showed that intensive thinning resulted in more stem volume and therefore total biomass allocation and carbon uptake compared to the moderate thinning.Relationship between tree height and diameter at breast height (i.e. slenderness) varied between both thinning intensity and type (i.e. from below and above) indicating differing response to thinning and allocation of stem growth of Scots pine trees. Furthermore, intensive thinning, especially from below, produced less variation in relative stem attributes characterizing stem shape and size. Thus, it can be concluded that thinning intensity,type, and the following growth effects have an impact on post-thinning stem shape and size of Scots pine trees.Our study presented detailed measurements on post-thinning stem growth of Scots pines that have been laborious or impracticable before the emergence of detailed 3D technologies. Moreover, the stem reconstructions from TLS and UAV provided variety of attributes characterizing stem shape and size that have not traditionally been feasible to obtain. The study demonstrated that detailed 3D technologies, such as TLS and UAV, provide information that can be used to generate new knowledge for supporting forest management and silviculture as well as improving ecological understanding of boreal forests.1
  • Tian, Xianglin; Sun, Shuaichao; Mola-Yudego, Blas; Cao, Tianjian (2020)
    Key message We propose a methodology to develop a preliminary version of a growth model when tree-level growth data are unavailable. This modelling approach predicts individual tree growth using only one-time observations from temporary plots. A virtual dataset was generated by linking the whole stand and diameter distribution models. The individual tree model was parameterized using Bayesian calibration and a likelihood of diameter distributions. Context A key component of tree-level growth and yield prediction is the diameter increment model that requires at least two different points in time with individual tree measurements. In some cases, however, sufficient inventory data from remeasured permanent or semitemporary plots are unavailable or difficult to access. Aims The purpose of this study was to propose a three-stage approach for modelling individual tree diameter growth based on temporary plots. Methods The first stage is to predict stand dynamics at 5-year intervals based on stand-level resource inventory data. The second stage is to simulate diameter distribution at 5-year intervals using a Weibull function based on tree-level research inventory data. The final stage is to improve the reliability of individual tree diameter estimates by updating parameters with Bayesian calibration based on a likelihood of diameter distributions. Results The virtual-data-based diameter increment model provided logical patterns and reliable performances in both tree- and stand-level predictions. Although it underestimated the growth of suppressed trees compared with tree cores and remeasurements, this bias was negligible when aggregating tree-level simulations into stand-level growth predictions. Conclusion Our virtual-data-based modelling approach only requires one-time observations from temporary plots, but provide reliable predictions of stand- and tree-level growth when validated with tree cores and whole-stand models. This preliminary model can be updated in a Bayesian framework when growth data from tree cores or remeasurements were obtained.