Browsing by Subject "Gut bacteria"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-4 of 4
  • Vari, Heli; Roslund, Marja; Oikarinen, Sami; Nurminen, Noora; Puhakka, Riikka; Parajuli, Anirudra; Grönroos, Mira; Siter, Nathan; Laitinen, Olli; Hyöty, Heikki; Rajaniemi, Juho; Rantalainen, Anna-Lea; Sinkkonen, Aki; The ADELE Research Group (2021)
    There is evidence that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and human gut microbiota are associated with the modulation of endocrine signaling pathways. Independently, studies have found associations between air pollution, land cover and commensal microbiota. We are the first to estimate the interaction between land cover categories associated with air pollution or purification, PAH levels and endocrine signaling predicted from gut metagenome among urban and rural populations. The study participants were elderly people (65-79 years); 30 lived in rural and 32 in urban areas. Semi-Permeable Membrane devices were utilized to measure air PAH concentrations as they simulate the process of bioconcentration in the fatty tissues. Land cover categories were estimated using CORINE database and geographic information system. Functional orthologues for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) pathway in endocrine system were analyzed from gut bacterial metagenome with Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes. High coverage of broad-leaved and mixed forests around the homes were associated with decreased PAH levels in ambient air, while gut functional orthologues for PPAR pathway increased along with these forest types. The difference between urban and rural PAH concentrations was not notable. However, some rural measurements were higher than the urban average, which was due to the use of heavy equipment on active farms. The provision of air purification by forests might be an important determining factor in the context of endocrine disruption potential of PAHs. Particularly broad-leaved forests around homes may reduce PAH levels in ambient air and balance pollution-induced disturbances within commensal gut microbiota. (C) 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  • Swann, J. R.; Rajilic-Stojanovic, M.; Salonen, A.; Sakwinska, O.; Gill, C.; Meynier, A.; Fanca-Berthon, P.; Schelkle, B.; Segata, N.; Shortt, C.; Tuohy, K.; Hasselwander, O. (2020)
    With the growing appreciation for the influence of the intestinal microbiota on human health, there is increasing motivation to design and refine interventions to promote favorable shifts in the microbiota and their interactions with the host. Technological advances have improved our understanding and ability to measure this indigenous population and the impact of such interventions. However, the rapid growth and evolution of the field, as well as the diversity of methods used, parameters measured and populations studied, make it difficult to interpret the significance of the findings and translate their outcomes to the wider population. This can prevent comparisons across studies and hinder the drawing of appropriate conclusions. This review outlines considerations to facilitate the design, implementation and interpretation of human gut microbiota intervention studies relating to foods based upon our current understanding of the intestinal microbiota, its functionality and interactions with the human host. This includes parameters associated with study design, eligibility criteria, statistical considerations, characterization of products and the measurement of compliance. Methodologies and markers to assess compositional and functional changes in the microbiota, following interventions are discussed in addition to approaches to assess changes in microbiota-host interactions and host responses. Last, EU legislative aspects in relation to foods and health claims are presented. While it is appreciated that the field of gastrointestinal microbiology is rapidly evolving, such guidance will assist in the design and interpretation of human gut microbiota interventional studies relating to foods.
  • van der Ark, Kees C. H.; Nugroho, Avis Dwi Wahyu; Berton-Carabin, Claire; Wang, Che; Belzer, Clara; de Vos, Willem M.; Schroen, Karin (2017)
    There is considerable attention for developing Akkermansia muciniphila as a new therapeutic microbe since it has shown to prevent diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes in mice. However, A. muciniphila is sensitive to gastric conditions such as low pH and oxygen. Therefore, we explored the possibility of encapsulating A. muciniphila in a water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) double emulsion, to allow for protection during gastric passage and subsequent release in the small intestine. The bacteria were efficiently encapsulated in the inner emulsion droplets and remained entrapped during in vitro gastric digestion. The cells were then released in the simulated intestinal phase of the in vitro system. The viability of encapsulated cells was found to be higher when compared to cells dispersed in buffer, that had been subjected to similar mechanical process as the one conducted to prepare the emulsion systems. Surprisingly, the viability of the processed cells was even higher than that of the cells dispersed in buffer without processing, likely due to shear-induced stress tolerance. To conclude, encapsulation in a double emulsion seems to be a. promising strategy to protect A. muciniphila during gastric passage in oral formulations.
  • Geerlings, Sharon Y.; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P.; Koehorst, Jasper J.; Ritari, Jarmo; Aalvink, Steven; Stecher, Bärbel; Schaap, Peter J.; Paulin, Lars; de Vos, Willem M.; Belzer, Clara (2021)
    Background Akkermansia muciniphila is a member of the human gut microbiota where it resides in the mucus layer and uses mucin as the sole carbon, nitrogen and energy source. A. muciniphila is the only representative of the Verrucomicrobia phylum in the human gut. However, A. muciniphila 16S rRNA gene sequences have also been found in the intestines of many vertebrates. Results We detected A. muciniphila-like bacteria in the intestines of animals belonging to 15 out of 16 mammalian orders. In addition, other species belonging to the Verrucomicrobia phylum were detected in fecal samples. We isolated 10 new A. muciniphila strains from the feces of chimpanzee, siamang, mouse, pig, reindeer, horse and elephant. The physiology and genome of these strains were highly similar in comparison to the type strain A. muciniphila Muc(T). Overall, the genomes of the new strains showed high average nucleotide identity (93.9 to 99.7%). In these genomes, we detected considerable conservation of at least 75 of the 78 mucin degradation genes that were previously detected in the genome of the type strain Muc(T). Conclusions The low genomic divergence observed in the new strains may indicate that A. muciniphila favors mucosal colonization independent of the differences in hosts. In addition, the conserved mucus degradation capability points towards a similar beneficial role of the new strains in regulating host metabolic health.