Browsing by Subject "HEAT"

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  • Pour-Aboughadareh, Alireza; Poczai, Péter (2021)
    The dataset herein indicated the novelty of the article entitled “Dataset on the use of MGIDI in screening drought-tolerant wild wheat accessions at the early growth stage”. Data were gathered during 2018-2019 on a set of wild wheat germplasm under two control and water deficit stress conditions. One hundred and forty-six accessions belonging to Ae. tauschii, Ae. cylindrica, and Ae. crassa were assessed under optimal glasshouse conditions to screen the drought-tolerant samples at the early growth stage. Nine drought tolerance and susceptibility indices along with the multi-trait genotype-ideotype distance index (MGIDI) were used to visualize the dataset. The obtained data can highlight the potential of the MGIDI index in accelerating screening of a large number of plant materials using multiple traits or selection indices in crop breeding programs, especially at the early growth stage.
  • Kittler, Fanny; Eugster, Werner; Foken, Thomas; Heimann, Martin; Kolle, Olaf; Göckede, Mathias (2017)
    This study aimed at quantifying potential negative effects of instrument heating to improve eddy-covariance flux data quality in cold environments. Our overarching objective was to minimize heating-related bias in annual CO2 budgets from an Arctic permafrost system. We used continuous eddy-covariance measurements covering three full years within an Arctic permafrost ecosystem with parallel sonic anemometers operation with activated heating and without heating as well as parallel operation of open- and closed-path gas analyzers, the latter serving as a reference. Our results demonstrate that the sonic anemometer heating has a direct effect on temperature measurements while the turbulent wind field is not affected. As a consequence, fluxes of sensible heat are increased by an average 5 W m(-2) with activated heating, while no direct effect on other scalar fluxes was observed. However, the biased measurements in sensible heat fluxes can have an indirect effect on the CO2 fluxes in case they are used as input for a density-flux WPL correction of an open-path gas analyzer. Evaluating the self-heating effect of the open-path gas analyzer by comparing CO2 flux measurements between open- and closed-path gas analyzers, we found systematically higher CO2 uptake recorded with the open-path sensor, leading to a cumulative annual offset of 96 g Cm-2, which was not only the result of the cold winter season but also due to substantial self-heating effects during summer. With an inclined sensor mounting, only a fraction of the self-heating correction for vertically mounted instruments is required.
  • Kittler, Fanny; Burjack, Ina; Corradi, Chiara A. R.; Heimann, Martin; Kolle, Olaf; Merbold, Lutz; Zimov, Nikita; Zimov, Sergey; Gockede, Mathias (2016)
    Hydrologic conditions are a major controlling factor for carbon exchange processes in high-latitude ecosystems. The presence or absence of water-logged conditions can lead to significant shifts in ecosystem structure and carbon cycle processes. In this study, we compared growing season CO2 fluxes of a wet tussock tundra ecosystem from an area affected by decadal drainage to an undisturbed area on the Kolyma floodplain in northeastern Siberia. For this comparison we found the sink strength for CO2 in recent years (2013-2015) to be systematically reduced within the drained area, with a minor increase in photosynthetic uptake due to a higher abundance of shrubs outweighed by a more pronounced increase in respiration due to warmer near-surface soil layers. Still, in comparison to the strong reduction of fluxes immediately following the drainage disturbance in 2005, recent CO2 exchange with the atmosphere over this disturbed part of the tundra indicate a higher carbon turnover, and a seasonal amplitude that is comparable again to that within the control section. This indicates that the local permafrost ecosystem is capable of adapting to significantly different hydrologic conditions without losing its capacity to act as a net sink for CO2 over the growing season. The comparison of undisturbed CO2 flux rates from 2013-2015 to the period of 2002-2004 indicates that CO2 exchange with the atmosphere was intensified, with increased component fluxes (ecosystem respiration and gross primary production) over the past decade. Net changes in CO2 fluxes are dominated by a major increase in photosynthetic uptake, resulting in a stronger CO2 sink in 2013-2015. Application of a MODIS-based classification scheme to separate the growing season into four sub-seasons improved the interpretation of interannual variability by illustrating the systematic shifts in CO2 uptake patterns that have occurred in this ecosystem over the past 10 years and highlighting the important role of the late growing season for net CO2 flux budgets.
  • Pour-Aboughadareh, Alireza; Yousefian, Mohsen; Moradkhani, Hoda; Poczai, Péter; Siddique, Kadambot HM (2019)
    PREMISE: In crop breeding programs, breeders use yield performance in both optimal and stressful environments as a key indicator for screening the most tolerant genotypes. During the past four decades, several yield-based indices have been suggested for evaluating stress tolerance in crops. Despite the well-established use of these indices in agronomy and plant breeding, a user-friendly software that would provide access to these methods is still lacking. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Plant Abiotic Stress Index Calculator (iPASTIC) is an online program based on JavaScript and R that calculates common stress tolerance and susceptibility indices for various crop traits including the tolerance index (TOL), relative stress index (RSI), mean productivity (MP), harmonic mean (HM), yield stability index (YSI), geometric mean productivity (GMP), stress susceptibility index (SSI), stress tolerance index (STI), and yield index (YI). Along with these indices, this easily accessible tool can also calculate their ranking patterns, estimate the relative frequency for each index, and create heat maps based on Pearson's and Spearman's rank-order correlation analyses. In addition, it can also render three-dimensional plots based on both yield performances and each index to separate entry genotypes into Fernandez's groups (A, B, C, and D), and perform principal component analysis. The accuracy of the results calculated from our software was tested using two different data sets obtained from previous experiments testing the salinity and drought stress in wheat genotypes, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: iPASTIC can be widely used in agronomy and plant breeding programs as a user-friendly interface for agronomists and breeders dealing with large volumes of data. The software is available at https://mohsenyousefian.com/ipastic/.
  • Karjalainen, Olli; Luoto, Miska; Aalto, Juha; Hjort, Jan (2019)
    The thermal state of permafrost affects Earth surface systems and human activity in the Arctic and has implications for global climate. Improved understanding of the local-scale variability in the global ground thermal regime is required to account for its sensitivity to changing climatic and geoecological conditions. Here, we statistically related observations of mean annual ground temperature (MAGT) and active-layer thickness (ALT) to high-resolution (similar to 1 km(2)) geospatial data of climatic and local environmental conditions across the Northern Hemisphere. The aim was to characterize the relative importance of key environmental factors and the magnitude and shape of their effects on MAGT and ALT. The multivariate models fitted well to both response variables with average R-2 values being similar to 0.94 and 0.78. Corresponding predictive performances in terms of root-mean-square error were similar to 1.31 degrees C and 87 cm. Freezing (FDD) and thawing (TDD) degree days were key factors for MAGT inside and outside the permafrost domain with average effect sizes of 6.7 and 13.6 degrees C, respectively. Soil properties had marginal effects on MAGT (effect size = 0.4-0.7 degrees C). For ALT, rainfall (effect size = 181 cm) and solar radiation (161 cm) were most influential. Analysis of variable importance further underlined the dominance of climate for MAGT and highlighted the role of solar radiation for ALT. Most response shapes for MAGT
  • Mammarella, Ivan; Peltola, Olli; Nordbo, Annika; Järvi, Leena; Rannik, Üllar (2016)
    We have carried out an inter-comparison between EddyUH and EddyPro (R), two public software packages for post-field processing of eddy covariance data. Datasets including carbon dioxide, methane and water vapour fluxes measured over 2 months at a wetland in southern Finland and carbon dioxide and water vapour fluxes measured over 3 months at an urban site in Helsinki were processed and analysed. The purpose was to estimate the flux uncertainty due to the use of different software packages and to evaluate the most critical processing steps, determining the largest deviations in the calculated fluxes. Turbulent fluxes calculated with a reference combination of processing steps were in good agreement, the systematic difference between the two software packages being up to 2.0 and 6.7% for half-hour and cumulative sum values, respectively. The raw data preparation and processing steps were consistent between the software packages, and most of the deviations in the estimated fluxes were due to the flux corrections. Among the different calculation procedures analysed, the spectral correction had the biggest impact for closed-path latent heat fluxes, reaching a nocturnal median value of 15% at the wetland site. We found up to a 43% median value of deviation (with respect to the run with all corrections included) if the closed-path carbon dioxide flux is calculated without the dilution correction, while the methane fluxes were up to 10% lower without both dilution and spectroscopic corrections. The Webb-Pearman-Leuning (WPL) and spectroscopic corrections were the most critical steps for open-path systems. However, we found also large spectral correction factors for the open-path methane fluxes, due to the sensor separation effect.
  • Foken, Thomas; Babel, Wolfgang; Munger, J. William; Gronholm, Tiia; Vesala, Timo; Knohl, Alexander (2021)
    Extensive studies are available that analyse time series of carbon dioxide and water flux measurements of FLUXNET sites over many years and link these results to climate change such as changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, air temperature and growing season length and other factors. Many of the sites show trends to a larger carbon uptake. Here we analyse time series of net ecosystem exchange, gross primary production, respiration, and evapotranspiration of four forest sites with particularly long measurement periods of about 20 years. The regular trends shown are interrupted by periods with higher or lower increases of carbon uptake. These breakpoints can be of very different origin and include forest decline, increased vegetation period, drought effects, heat waves, and changes in site heterogeneity. The influence of such breakpoints should be included in long-term studies of land-atmosphere exchange processes.
  • Benenti, Giuliano; Casati, Giulio; Mejia-Monasterio, Carlos (2014)