Browsing by Subject "HERITAGE"

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  • Kletter, Raz (2015)
    This paper reviews the forgotten history of the museum of the Israel Department of Antiquities and Museums (hereafter IDAM) in Jerusalem, which until 1965 was the central archaeological museum of the State of Israel. From its humble beginnings with a small temporary exhibition in 1949, the creators of this museum gathered together a large and important collection of antiquities. These founders hoped to create the cornerstone for the future new central museum of Israel. However, the State entrusted the general manager of the Prime Minister’s office, Tedi Kollek with the establishment of this new museum. In 1962, Avraham Biran, who worked closely with Kollek, was appointed director of IDAM. Biran eventually transferred the treasures of the IDAM to the new Bronfman Museum, the archaeological section of the Israel Museum.
  • Laužikas, Rimvydas; Dallas, Costis; Thomas, Suzie; Kelpšienė, Ingrida; Huvila, Isto; Luengo, Pedro; Nobre, Helena; Toumpouri, Marina; Vaitkevičius, Vykintas (2018)
    Archaeology and material cultural heritage enjoys a particular status as a form of heritage that, capturing the public imagination, has become the locus for the expression and negotiation of regional, national, and intra-national cultural identities. One important question is: why and how do contemporary people engage with archaeological heritage objects, artefacts, information or knowledge outside the realm of an professional, academically-based archaeology? This question is investigated here from the perspective of theoretical considerations based on Yuri Lotman's semiosphere theory, which helps to describe the connections between the centre and peripheries of professional archaeology as sign structures. The centre may be defined according to prevalent scientific paradigms, while periphery in the space of creolisation in which, through interactions with other culturally more distant sign structures, archaeology-related non-professional communities emerge. On the basis of these considerations, we use collocation analysis on representative English language corpora to outline the structure of the field of archaeology-related non-professional communities, identify salient creolised peripheral spaces and archaeology-related practices, and develop a framework for further investigation of archaeological knowledge production and reuse in the context of global archaeology.
  • Botez, Andrei; Hietanen, Joel; Tikkanen, Henrikki (2020)
    In this study, we critically examine the ongoing adoption of various posthumanist influences into the fields of marketing and consumer research from a theological perspective. By conducting a theological-historical assessment, we propose that it is not posthuman notions of human/technology relations, nor their broader context in the emerging non-representational paradigms, that mark radically new disruptions in the continuing restructuring of the disciplines of marketing and consumer research. Instead, we argue that what is taking place is an implicit adherence to a contemporary form of age-old Christian dogma. As a radical conjecture, we thus propose that an identification of certain similarities between Christian dogma and the grounds for various posthumanist frameworks suggest that posthuman thought may well herald the global dissemination of a far more elusive, authoritarian, and hegemonic system than that which posthumanists typically claim to have abandoned. Consequently, we elaborate on implications to developments in marketing thought.
  • Rautio, Suvi (2021)
    Ethnic minority villages across Southwest China have recently experienced a dramatic increase in cultural heritage projects. Following new policies of rural development and the growth of tourism, villages are being converted into heritage sites to preserve the aesthetics of rurality and ethnicity. This article describes how architect scholars plan to create a ‘Chinese Traditional Village’ in a Dong autonomous district of Guizhou province, focusing in particular on the constraints of those plans and the negotiations. Rather than looking at plans as the end product, this article sheds light on the social dynamics of planning to reconsider the capacity for compromise between the interests and perspectives of planners, officials, and local inhabitants. Lasting compromises appear specifically in the materiality of buildings, pathways, and public space.