Browsing by Subject "HIGH-THROUGHPUT"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-18 of 18
  • Clark, Christine; Palta, Priit; Joyce, Christopher J.; Scott, Carol; Grundberg, Elin; Deloukas, Panos; Palotie, Aarno; Coffey, Alison J. (2012)
  • Day-Williams, Aaron G.; McLay, Kirsten; Drury, Eleanor; Edkins, Sarah; Coffey, Alison J.; Palotie, Aarno; Zeggini, Eleftheria (2011)
  • Davis-Richardson, Austin G.; Ardissone, Alexandria N.; Dias, Raquel; Simell, Ville; Leonard, Michael T.; Kemppainen, Kaisa M.; Drew, Jennifer C.; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark A.; Kolaczkowski, Bryan; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Toppari, Jorma; Nurminen, Noora; Hyoty, Heikki; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Tuula; Mykkanen, Juha; Simell, Olli; Triplett, Eric W. (2014)
  • Williamson, Charles H. D.; Sahl, Jason W.; Smith, Theresa J.; Xie, Gary; Foley, Brian T.; Smith, Leonard A.; Fernandez, Rafael A.; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu; Keim, Paul; Foster, Jeffrey; Hill, Karen (2016)
    Background: Clostridium botulinum is a diverse group of bacteria characterized by the production of botulinum neurotoxin. Botulinum neurotoxins are classified into serotypes (BoNT/A-G), which are produced by six species/Groups of Clostridia, but the genetic background of the bacteria remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to use comparative genomics to provide insights into the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of bacteria that produce the potent botulinum neurotoxin. Results: Comparative genomic analyses of over 170 Clostridia genomes, including our draft genome assemblies for 59 newly sequenced Clostridia strains from six continents and publicly available genomic data, provided in-depth insights into the diversity and distribution of BoNT-producing bacteria. These newly sequenced strains included Group I and II strains that express BoNT/A,/B,/E, or/F as well as bivalent strains. BoNT-producing Clostridia and closely related Clostridia species were delineated with a variety of methods including 16S rRNA gene, concatenated marker genes, core genome and concatenated multi-locus sequencing typing (MLST) gene phylogenies that related whole genome sequenced strains to publicly available strains and sequence types. These analyses illustrated the phylogenetic diversity in each Group and the diversity of genomic backgrounds that express the same toxin type or subtype. Comparisons of the botulinum neurotoxin genes did not identify novel toxin types or variants. Conclusions: This study represents one of the most comprehensive analyses of whole genome sequence data for Group I and II BoNT-producing strains. Read data and draft genome assemblies generated for 59 isolates will be a resource to the research community. Core genome phylogenies proved to be a powerful tool for differentiating BoNT-producing strains and can provide a framework for the study of these bacteria. Comparative genomic analyses of Clostridia species illustrate the diversity of botulinum-neurotoxin-producing strains and the plasticity of the genomic backgrounds in which bont genes are found.
  • Ramo, Joel T.; Ripatti, Pietari; Tabassum, Rubina; Soderlund, Sanni; Matikainen, Niina; Gerl, Mathias J.; Klose, Christian; Surma, Michal A.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Pirinen, Matti; Salomaa, Veikko; Freimer, Nelson B.; Jauhiainen, Matti; Palotie, Aarno; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Simons, Kai; Ripatti, Samuli (2019)
    Background-We asked whether, after excluding familial hypercholesterolemia, individuals with high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) or triacylglyceride levels and a family history of the same hyperlipidemia have greater coronary artery disease risk or different lipidomic profiles compared with population-based hyperlipidemias. Methods and Results-We determined incident coronary artery disease risk for 755 members of 66 hyperlipidemic families (>2 first-degree relatives with similar hyperlipidemia) and 19 644 Finnish FINRISK population study participants. We quantified 151 circulating lipid species from 550 members of 73 hyperlipidemic families and 897 FINRISK participants using mass spectrometric shotgun lipidomics. Familial hypercholesterolemia was excluded using functional LDL receptor testing and genotyping. Hyperlipidemias (LDL-C or triacylglycerides >90th population percentile) associated with increased coronary artery disease risk in meta-analysis of the hyperlipidemic families and the population cohort (high LDL-C: hazard ratio, 1.74 [95% CI, 1.48-2.04]; high triacylglycerides: hazard ratio, 1.38 [95% CI 1.09-1.74]). Risk estimates were similar in the family and population cohorts also after adjusting for lipid-lowering medication. In lipidomic profiling, high LDL-C associated with 108 lipid species, and high triacylglycerides associated with 131 lipid species in either cohort (at 5% false discovery rate; P-value range 0.038-2.3x 10(-56)). Lipidomic profiles were highly similar for hyperlipidemic individuals in the families and the population (LDL-C: r=0.80; triacylglycerides: r=0.96; no lipid species deviated between the cohorts). Conclusions-Hyperlipidemias with family history conferred similar coronary artery disease risk as population-based hyperlipidemias. We identified distinct lipidomic profiles associated with high LDL-C and triacylglycerides. Lipidomic profiles were similar between hyperlipidemias with family history and population-ascertained hyperlipidemias, providing evidence of similar and overlapping underlying mechanisms.
  • Kiamehr, Mostafa; Heiskanen, Laura; Laufer, Thomas; Duesterloh, Aneta; Kahraman, Mustafa; Kakela, Reijo; Laaksonen, Reijo; Aalto-Setala, Katriina (2019)
    Aim: Primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) undergo dedifferentiation upon the two-dimensional (2D) culture, which particularly hinders their utility in long-term in vitro studies. Lipids, as a major class of biomolecules, play crucial roles in cellular energy storage, structure, and signaling. Here, for the first time, we mapped the alterations in the lipid profile of the dedifferentiating PHHs and studied the possible role of lipids in the loss of the phenotype of PHHs. Simultaneously, differentially expressed miRNAs associated with changes in the lipids and fatty acids (FAs) of the dedifferentiating PHHs were investigated. Methods: PHHs were cultured in monolayer and their phenotype was monitored morphologically, genetically, and biochemically for five days. The lipid and miRNA profile of the PHHs were analyzed by mass spectrometry and Agilent microarray, respectively. In addition, 24 key genes involved in the metabolism of lipids and FAs were investigated by qPCR. Results: The typical morphology of PHHs was lost from day 3 onward. Additionally, ALB and CYP genes were downregulated in the cultured PHHs. Lipidomics revealed a clear increase in the saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) containing lipids, but a decrease in the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) containing lipids during the dedifferentiation of PHHs. In line with this, FASN, SCD, ELOVL1, ELOVL3, and ELOVL7 were upregulated but ELOVL2 was downregulated in the dedifferentiated PHHs. Furthermore, differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, and the constantly upregulated miR-27a and miR-21, and downregulated miR-30 may have regulated the synthesis, accumulation and secretion of PHH lipids during the dedifferentiation. Conclusion: Our results showed major alterations in the molecular lipid species profiles, lipid-metabolizing enzyme expression as wells as miRNA profiles of the PHHs during their prolonged culture, which in concert could play important roles in the PHHs' loss of phenotype. These findings promote the understanding from the dedifferentiation process and could help in developing optimal culture conditions, which better meet the needs of the PHHs and support their original phenotype.
  • Sathyanarayanan, Gowtham; Haapala, Markus; Kiiski, Iiro; Sikanen, Tiina (2018)
    We report the development and characterization of digital microfluidic (DMF) immobilized enzyme reactors (IMERs) for studying cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated drug metabolism on droplet scale. The on-chip IMERs consist of porous polymer (thiol-ene) monolith plugs prepared in situ by photopolymerization and functionalized with recombinant CYP1A1 isoforms (an important detoxification route for many drugs and other xenobiotics). The DMF devices also incorporate inexpensive, inkjet-printed microheaters for on-demand regio-specific heating of the IMERs to physiological temperature, which is crucial for maintaining the activity of the temperature-sensitive CYP reaction. For on-chip monitoring of the CYP activity, the DMF devices were combined with a commercial well-plate reader, and a custom fluorescence quantification method was developed for detection of the chosen CYP1A1 model activity (ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation). The reproducibility of the developed assay was examined with the help of ten parallel CYP-IMERs. All CYP-IMERs provided statistically significant difference (in fluorescence response) compared to any of the negative controls (including room-temperature reactions). The average (n = 10) turnover rate was 20.3 +/- 9.0 fmol resorufin per minute. Via parallelization, the concept of the droplet-based CYP-IMER developed in this study provides a viable approach to rapid and low-cost prediction of the metabolic clearance of new chemical entities in vitro.
  • Oversti, Sanni; Onkamo, Paivi; Stoljarova, Monika; Budowle, Bruce; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U. (2017)
    In Europe, modern mitochondrial diversity is relatively homogeneous and suggests an ubiquitous rapid population growth since the Neolithic revolution. Similar patterns also have been observed in mitochondrial control region data in Finland, which contrasts with the distinctive autosomal and Y-chromosomal diversity among Finns. A different picture emerges from the 843 whole mitochondrial genomes from modern Finns analyzed here. Up to one third of the subhaplogroups can be considered as Finn-characteristic, i.e. rather common in Finland but virtually absent or rare elsewhere in Europe. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses suggest that most of these attributed Finnish lineages date back to around 3,000-5,000 years, coinciding with the arrival of Corded Ware culture and agriculture into Finland. Bayesian estimation of past effective population sizes reveals two differing demographic histories: 1) the 'local' Finnish mtDNA haplotypes yielding small and dwindling size estimates for most of the past; and 2) the 'immigrant' haplotypes showing growth typical of most European populations. The results based on the local diversity are more in line with that known about Finns from other studies, e.g., Y-chromosome analyses and archaeology findings. The mitochondrial gene pool thus may contain signals of local population history that cannot be readily deduced from the total diversity.
  • Ritari, Jarmo; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Lahti, Leo; de Vos, Willem M. (2015)
    Background: Current sequencing technology enables taxonomic profiling of microbial ecosystems at high resolution and depth by using the 16S rRNA gene as a phylogenetic marker. Taxonomic assignation of newly acquired data is based on sequence comparisons with comprehensive reference databases to find consensus taxonomy for representative sequences. Nevertheless, even with well-characterised ecosystems like the human intestinal microbiota it is challenging to assign genus and species level taxonomy to 16S rRNA amplicon reads. A part of the explanation may lie in the sheer size of the search space where competition from a multitude of highly similar sequences may not allow reliable assignation at low taxonomic levels. However, when studying a particular environment such as the human intestine, it can be argued that a reference database comprising only sequences that are native to the environment would be sufficient, effectively reducing the search space. Results: We constructed a 16S rRNA gene database based on high-quality sequences specific for human intestinal microbiota, resulting in curated data set consisting of 2473 unique prokaryotic species-like groups and their taxonomic lineages, and compared its performance against the Greengenes and Silva databases. The results showed that regardless of used assignment algorithm, our database improved taxonomic assignation of 16S rRNA sequencing data by enabling significantly higher species and genus level assignation rate while preserving taxonomic diversity and demanding less computational resources. Conclusion: The curated human intestinal 16S rRNA gene taxonomic database of about 2500 species-like groups described here provides a practical solution for significantly improved taxonomic assignment for phylogenetic studies of the human intestinal microbiota.
  • Alves, Ana Catarina; Magarkar, Aniket; Horta, Miguel; Lima, Jose L. F. C.; Bunker, Alex; Nunes, Claudia; Reis, Salette (2017)
    Despite doxorubicin being commonly used in chemotherapy there still remain significant holes in our knowledge regarding its delivery efficacy and an observed resistance mechanism that is postulated to involve the cell membrane. One possible mechanism is the efflux by protein P-gp, which is found predominantly in cholesterol enriched domains. Thereby, a hypothesis for the vulnerability of doxorubicin to efflux through P-gp is its enhanced affinity for the ordered cholesterol rich regions of the plasma membrane. Thus, we have studied doxorubicin's interaction with model membranes in a cholesterol rich, ordered environment and in liquid-disordered cholesterol poor environment. We have combined three separate experimental protocols: UV-Vis spectrophotometry, fluorescence quenching and steady-state anisotropy and computational molecular dynamics modeling. Our results show that the presence of cholesterol induces a change in membrane structure and doesn't impair doxorubicin's membrane partitioning, but reduces drug's influence on membrane fluidity without directly interacting with it. It is thus possible that the resistance mechanism that lowers the efficacy of doxorubicin, results from an increased density in membrane regions where the efflux proteins are present. This work represents a successful approach, combining experimental and computational studies of membrane based systems to unveil the behavior of drugs and candidate drug molecules.
  • Schillebeeckx, Maximiliaan; Schrade, Anja; Loebs, Ann-Kathrin; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Wilson, David B.; Mitra, Robi D. (2013)
  • Kiamehr, Mostafa; Viiri, Leena E.; Vihervaara, Terhi; Koistinen, Kaisa M.; Hilvo, Mika; Ekroos, Kim; Kakela, Reijo; Aalto-Setala, Katriina (2017)
    Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer an alternative model to primary human hepatocytes to study lipid aberrations. However, the detailed lipid profile of HLCs is yet unknown. In the current study, functional HLCs were differentiated from iPSCs generated from dermal fibroblasts of three individuals by a three-step protocol through the definitive endoderm (DE) stage. In parallel, detailed lipidomic analyses as well as gene expression profiling of a set of lipid-metabolism-related genes were performed during the entire differentiation process from iPSCs to HLCs. Additionally, fatty acid (FA) composition of the cell culture media at different stages was determined. Our results show that major alterations in the molecular species of lipids occurring during DE and early hepatic differentiation stages mainly mirror the quality and quantity of the FAs supplied in culture medium at each stage. Polyunsaturated phospholipids and sphingolipids with a very long FA were produced in the cells at a later stage of differentiation. This work uncovers the previously unknown lipid composition of iPSC-HLCs and its alterations during the differentiation in conjunction with the expression of key lipid-associated genes. Together with biochemical, functional and gene expression measurements, the lipidomic analyses allowed us to improve our understanding of the concerted influence of the exogenous metabolite supply and cellular biosynthesis essential for iPSC-HLC differentiation and function. Importantly, the study describes in detail a cell model that can be applied in exploring, for example, the lipid metabolism involved in the development of fatty liver disease or atherosclerosis.
  • Gerl, Mathias J.; Klose, Christian; Surma, Michal A.; Fernandez, Celine; Melander, Olle; Männistö, Satu; Borodulin, Katja; Havulinna, Aki S.; Salomaa, Veikko; Ikonen, Elina; Cannistraci, Carlo V.; Simons, Kai (2019)
    Obesity is associated with changes in plasma lipids, but while simple lipid quantification is routinely used, plasma lipids are rarely investigated at the level of individual molecules. A machine learning study based on lipidomes of a total of 1,311 individuals reveals improved associations of plasma lipids with total body fat and fat distribution compared to routine clinical laboratory variables.
  • Dickinson, Amy; Saraswat, Mayank; Joenväärä, Sakari; Agarwal, Rahul; Jyllikoski, Daniel; Wilkman, Tommy; Mäkitie, Antti; Silen, Suvi (2020)
    Lipid metabolic reprogramming is one hallmark of cancer. Lipid metabolism is regulated by numerous enzymes, many of which are targeted by several drugs on the market. We aimed to characterize the lipid alterations in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as a basis for understanding its lipid metabolism, thus identifying potential therapeutic targets. We compared lipid species, classes, and glycerophospholipid (GPL) fatty acid species between paired tumor tissue and healthy oral tongue mucosa samples from 10 OSCC patients using a QExactive mass spectrometer. After filtering the 1370 lipid species identified, we analyzed 349 species: 71 were significantly increased in OSCC. The GPL metabolism pathway was most represented by the lipids differing in OSCC (P = .005). Cholesterol and the GPLs phosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylethanolamines, and phosphatidylinositols were most significantly increased in OSCC tissue (FC 1.8, 2.0, 2.1, and 2.3 and, P = .003, P = .005, P = .002, P = .007). In conclusion, we have demonstrated a shift in the lipid metabolism in these OSCC samples by characterizing the detailed landscape. Predominantly, cholesterol and GPL metabolism were altered, suggesting that interactions with sterol regulatory binding proteins may be involved. The FA composition changes of the GPLs suggest increased de novo lipogenesis.
  • Culebro, Alejandra; Machado, Miguel P.; Carrico, Joao Andre; Rossi, Mirko (2018)
    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Additionally, C. jejuni is the most common bacterial etiological agent in the autoimmune Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS). Ganglioside mimicry by C. jejuni lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is the triggering factor of the disease. LOS-associated genes involved in the synthesis and transfer of sialic acid (glycosyltranferases belonging to family GT-42) are essential in C. jejuni to synthesize ganglioside-like LOS. Despite being isolated from GBS patients, scarce genetic evidence supports C. coli role in the disease. In this study, through data mining and bioinformatics analysis, C. coli is shown to possess a larger GT-42 glycosyltransferase repertoire than C. jejuni. Although GT-42 glycosyltransferases are widely distributed in C. coli population, only a fraction of C. coli strains (1%) are very likely able to express ganglioside mimics. Even though the activity of C. coli specific GT-42 enzymes and their role in shaping the bacterial population are yet to be explored, evidence presented herein suggest that loss of function of some LOS-associated genes occurred during agriculture niche adaptation.
  • Bozcal, Elif; Eldem, Vahap; Aydemir, Sohret; Skurnik, Mikael (2018)
    Background. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is an important bacterium and responsible for many bloodstream infections, including urinary tract infections and even fatal bacteremia. The aim of this research was to investigate whether ExPEC strains isolated from Turkish blood cultures have a relationship between 16S rRNA based phylogenetic clusters and antibiotic resistance profiles, virulence factors or clonal lineages. Methods. Phenotypically identified ExPEC blood culture isolates (n = 104) were included in this study. The 16S rRNA partial sequence analysis was performed for genotypic identification of ExPEC isolates. Antibiotic susceptibility and Extended Spectrum beta-Lactamase testing of isolates were performed. Phylogenetic classification (A, B1, B2 and D), Multi Locus Sequence Typing analysis and virulence-associated genes were investigated. Results. Based on 16S rRNA partial sequence analysis, 97 out of 104 (93.26%) ExPEC isolates were confirmed as E. coli. Ampicillin (74.22%) and cefuroxime axetil (65.97%) resistances had the highest frequencies among the ExPEC isolates. In terms of phylogenetic classification of ExPEC, D (38.14%, 37/97) was the most prevalent group after A (29.89%, 29/97), B2 (20.61%, 20/97), and B1 (11.34%, 11/97). The sequence types of the 20 ExPEC isolates belonging to the B2 phylogenetic group were analyzed by Multi Locus Sequence Typing. Ten isolates out of 20 (50.0%) were identified as ST131. The other STs were ST95 (n=1), ST14 (n=1), ST10 (n=1), ST69 (n=1), ST1722 (n=2), ST141 (n=1), ST88 (n=1), ST80 (n=1), and ST998 (n=1). Of the ST131 strains, six (60%, 6/10) represented serogroup O25. The most common virulence factor genes were serum resistance factor gene, traT (55.7%) aerobactin siderophore receptor and yersiniabactin encoding genes iutA (45.3%) and fyuA (50.5%), respectively. In addition, PAI (41.2%), iroN (23.7%), hlyA (15.4%), kpsII (13.4%), ompT (13.4%), papG (12.4%), iss (9.3%), cnf1 (7.2%), ibeA (2.06%), and sfaS (2.06%) genes were present in the ExPEC isolates. Conclusion. The 16S rRNA-based phylogenetic relationship tree analysis showed that a large cluster was present among 97 ExPEC isolates along with related reference strains. There were 21 main clusters with 32 closely related subclusters. Based on our findings, different clonal lineages of ExPEC can display different antibiotic susceptibilities and virulence properties. We also concluded that virulence factors were not distributed depending on phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D). The ExPEC isolates belonging to the same phylogenetic group and sequence type could display different resistance and virulence characteristics.
  • Feola, Sara; Chiaro, Jacopo; Martins, Beatriz; Cerullo, Vincenzo (2020)
    According to the latest available data, cancer is the second leading cause of death, highlighting the need for novel cancer therapeutic approaches. In this context, immunotherapy is emerging as a reliable first-line treatment for many cancers, particularly metastatic melanoma. Indeed, cancer immunotherapy has attracted great interest following the recent clinical approval of antibodies targeting immune checkpoint molecules, such as PD-1, PD-L1, and CTLA-4, that release the brakes of the immune system, thus reviving a field otherwise poorly explored. Cancer immunotherapy mainly relies on the generation and stimulation of cytotoxic CD8 T lymphocytes (CTLs) within the tumor microenvironment (TME), priming T cells and establishing efficient and durable anti-tumor immunity. Therefore, there is a clear need to define and identify immunogenic T cell epitopes to use in therapeutic cancer vaccines. Naturally presented antigens in the human leucocyte antigen-1 (HLA-I) complex on the tumor surface are the main protagonists in evocating a specific anti-tumor CD8+ T cell response. However, the methodologies for their identification have been a major bottleneck for their reliable characterization. Consequently, the field of antigen discovery has yet to improve. The current review is intended to define what are today known as tumor antigens, with a main focus on CTL antigenic peptides. We also review the techniques developed and employed to date for antigen discovery, exploring both the direct elution of HLA-I peptides and the in silico prediction of epitopes. Finally, the last part of the review analyses the future challenges and direction of the antigen discovery field.