Browsing by Subject "HYDROGEN-SULFIDE"

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  • Harrison, Jesse P.; Chronopoulou, Panagiota-Myrsini; Salonen, Iines S.; Jilbert, Tom; Koho, Karoliina A. (2021)
    Metabarcoding analyses of bacterial and eukaryotic communities have been proposed as efficient tools for environmental impact assessment. It has been unclear, however, to which extent these analyses can provide similar or differing information on the ecological status of the environment. Here, we used 16S and 18S rRNA gene metabarcoding to compare eutrophication-induced shifts in sediment bacterial and eukaryotic community structure in relation to a range of porewater, sediment and bottom-water geochemical variables, using data obtained from six stations near a former rainbow trout farm in the Archipelago Sea (Baltic Sea). Shifts in the structure of both community types were correlated with a shared set of variables, including porewater ammonium concentrations and the sediment depth-integrated oxygen consumption rate. Distance-based redundancy analyses showed that variables typically employed in impact assessments, such as bottom water nutrient concentrations, explained less of the variance in community structure than alternative variables (e.g., porewater NH4+ inventories and sediment depth-integrated O2 consumption rates) selected due to their low collinearity (up to 40 vs. 58% of the variance explained, respectively). In monitoring surveys where analyses of both bacterial and eukaryotic communities may be impossible, either 16S or 18S rRNA gene metabarcoding can serve as reliable indicators of wider ecological impacts of eutrophication.
  • Postila, Pekka A.; Róg, Tomasz (2020)
    Synaptic neurotransmission is generally considered as a function of membrane-embedded receptors and ion channels in response to the neurotransmitter (NT) release and binding. This perspective aims to widen the protein-centric view by including another vital component—the synaptic membrane—in the discussion. A vast set of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and biophysical experiments indicate that NTs are divided into membrane-binding and membrane-nonbinding categories. The binary choice takes place at the water-membrane interface and follows closely the positioning of the receptors’ binding sites in relation to the membrane. Accordingly, when a lipophilic NT is on route to a membrane-buried binding site, it adheres on the membrane and, then, travels along its plane towards the receptor. In contrast, lipophobic NTs, which are destined to bind into receptors with extracellular binding sites, prefer the water phase. This membrane-based sorting splits the neurotransmission into membrane-independent and membrane-dependent mechanisms and should make the NT binding into the receptors more efficient than random diffusion would allow. The potential implications and notable exceptions to the mechanisms are discussed here. Importantly, maintaining specific membrane lipid compositions (MLCs) at the synapses, especially regarding anionic lipids, affect the level of NT-membrane association. These effects provide a plausible link between the MLC imbalances and neurological diseases such as depression or Parkinson’s disease. Moreover, the membrane plays a vital role in other phases of the NT life cycle, including storage and release from the synaptic vesicles, transport from the synaptic cleft, as well as their synthesis and degradation.
  • Alshami, Abbas; Einav, Sharon; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Varon, Joseph (2020)
    Objective: Inhalation of noble and other gases after cardiac arrest (CA) might improve neurological and cardiac outcomes. This article discusses up-to-date information on this novel therapeutic intervention. Data sources: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, online published abstracts from conference proceedings, clinical trial registry clinicaltrials.gov, and reference lists of relevant papers were systematically searched from January 1960 till March 2019. Study selection: Preclinical and clinical studies, irrespective of their types or described outcomes, were included. Data extraction: Abstract screening, study selection, and data extraction were performed by two independent authors. Due to the paucity of human trials, risk of bias assessment was not performed DATA SYNTHESIS: After screening 281 interventional studies, we included an overall of 27. Only, xenon, helium, hydrogen, and nitric oxide have been or are being studied on humans. Xenon, nitric oxide, and hydrogen show both neuroprotective and cardiotonic features, while argon and hydrogen sulfide seem neuroprotective, but not cardiotonic. Most gases have elicited neurohistological protection in preclinical studies; however, only hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide appeared to preserve CA1 sector of hippocampus, the most vulnerable area in the brain for hypoxia. Conclusion: Inhalation of certain gases after CPR appears promising in mitigating neurological and cardiac damage and may become the next successful neuroprotective and cardiotonic interventions. (C) 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Jokinen, Sami A.; Koho, Karoliina; Virtasalo, Joonas J.; Jilbert, Tom (2020)
    Molybdenum (Mo) and uranium (U) contents in sedimentary archives are often used to reconstruct past changes in seafloor oxygenation. However, their sequestration processes are as yet poorly constrained in low-salinity coastal waters, which often suffer from anthropogenic eutrophication but only mild oxygen depletion. Due to the consequent lack of robust long-term paleo-redox reconstructions in such settings often characterized by a shallow front of dissolved sulfide accumulation within the sediment pore waters, inadequate understanding of the long-term drivers behind oxygen loss impedes cost-effective mitigation of this environmental problem. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of Mo and U sequestration in an oxic, low-salinity coastal setting in the northern Baltic Sea where anthropogenic eutrophication over the 20th century has resulted in formation of a shallow sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) in the sediment column of this brackish-water basin. Our results demonstrate remarkably similar patterns for authigenic Mo and U sequestration, whereby the depth and intensity of the SMTZ exerts a first-order control on their solid-phase uptake. Sequential extraction analysis suggests that a large part of the authigenic Mo pool is hosted by refractory Fe-S phases such as pyrite and nanoscale FeMoS4, implying that the Fe-sulfide pathway is the dominating process of authigenic Mo scavenging. However, we also observe a pool of extremely labile Mo deep within the SMTZ, which might record an intermediate phase in authigenic Mo sequestration and/or partial switch to the organic matter (OM) pathway at low dissolved Fe levels. Authigenic U resides in acid-extractable and refractory phases, likely reflecting uptake into poorly crystalline monomeric U(IV) and crystalline uraninite, respectively. Similarly to Mo, authigenic U uptake is active at two fronts within the SMTZ, paralleled by increases in dissolved sulfide levels, suggesting coupling between sulfide production and U reduction. Our results imply that both Mo and U could provide viable proxies for mild bottom water deoxygenation in these settings, through the indirect link between seafloor oxygen conditions and the depth of SMTZ. Of these, Mo appears to more robustly capture variations in seafloor oxygen levels due to the significantly higher share of the authigenic pool. However, temporal resolution of these proxies is limited by the vertical offset between seafloor and the zone of authigenic uptake, and the superimposed character of the signal at a given depth due to vertical migrations of the SMTZ. These results have important implications for the use of Mo and U as paleo-redox proxies in other low-salinity coastal settings exposed to eutrophication.
  • Murros, Kari E.; Huynh, Anh Vy; Takala, Timo M.; Saris, Per E. J. (2021)
    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most prevalent movement disorder known and predominantly affects the elderly. It is a progressive neurodegenerative disease wherein alpha-synuclein, a neuronal protein, aggregates to form toxic structures in nerve cells. The cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains unknown. Intestinal dysfunction and changes in the gut microbiota, common symptoms of PD, are evidently linked to the pathogenesis of PD. Although a multitude of studies have investigated microbial etiologies of PD, the microbial role in disease progression remains unclear. Here, we show that Gram-negative sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio may play a potential role in the development of PD. Conventional and quantitative real-time PCR analysis of feces from twenty PD patients and twenty healthy controls revealed that all PD patients harbored Desulfovibrio bacteria in their gut microbiota and these bacteria were present at higher levels in PD patients than in healthy controls. Additionally, the concentration of Desulfovibrio species correlated with the severity of PD. Desulfovibrio bacteria produce hydrogen sulfide and lipopolysaccharide, and several strains synthesize magnetite, all of which likely induce the oligomerization and aggregation of alpha-synuclein protein. The substances originating from Desulfovibrio bacteria likely take part in pathogenesis of PD. These findings may open new avenues for the treatment of PD and the identification of people at risk for developing PD.
  • Jilbert, Thomas Stephen; Asmala, Eero; Schröder, Christian; Tiihonen, Rosa Maria Elina; Myllykangas, Jukka-Pekka; Kotilainen, Aarno; Virtasalo, Joonas; Peltola, Pasi; Ekholm, Päivi Inkeri; Hietanen, Siru Susanna (2018)
    Iron (Fe) plays a key role in sedimentary diagenetic processes in coastal systems, participating in various redox reactions and influencing the burial of organic carbon. Large amounts of Fe enter the marine environment from boreal river catchments associated with dissolved organic matter (DOM) and as colloidal Fe oxyhydroxides, principally ferrihydrite. However, the fate of this Fe pool in estuarine sediments has not been extensively studied. Here we show that flocculation processes along a salinity gradient in an estuary of the northern Baltic Sea efficiently transfer Fe and OM from the dissolved phase into particulate material that accumulates in the sediments. Flocculation of Fe and OM is partially decoupled. This is likely due to the presence of discrete colloidal ferrihydrite in the freshwater Fe pool, which responds differently from DOM to estuarine mixing. Further decoupling of Fe from OM occurs during sedimentation. While we observe a clear decline with distance offshore in the proportion of terrestrial material in the sedimentary particulate organic matter (POM) pool, the distribution of flocculated Fe in sediments is modulated by focusing effects. Labile Fe phases are most abundant at a deep site in the inner basin of the estuary, consistent with input from flocculation and subsequent focusing. The majority of the labile Fe pool is present as Fe (II), including both acid-volatile sulfur (AVS)-bound Fe and unsulfidized phases. The ubiquitous presence of unsulfidized Fe (II) throughout the sediment column suggests Fe (II)-OM complexes derived from reduction of flocculated Fe (III)-OM, while other Fe (II) phases are likely derived from the reduction of flocculated ferrihydrite. Depth-integrated rates of Fe (II) accumulation (AVS-Fe + unsulfidized Fe (II) + pyrite) for the period 1970-2015 are greater in the inner basin of the estuary with respect to a site further offshore, confirming higher rates of Fe reduction in near-shore areas. Mossbauer Fe-57 spectroscopy shows that refractory Fe is composed largely of superparamagnetic Fe (III), high-spin Fe (II) in silicates, and, at one station, also oxide minerals derived from past industrial activities. Our results highlight that the cycling of Fe in boreal estuarine environments is complex, and that the partial decoupling of Fe from OM during flocculation and sedimentation is key to understanding the role of Fe in sedimentary diagenetic processes in coastal areas.
  • Myllykangas, Jukka-Pekka; Hietanen, Susanna; Jilbert, Tom (2019)
    Estuaries are important conduits between terrestrial and marine aquatic systems and function as hot spots in the aquatic methane cycle. Eutrophication and climate change may accelerate methane emissions from estuaries, causing positive feedbacks with global warming. Boreal regions will warm rapidly in the coming decades, increasing the need to understand methane cycling in these systems. In this 3-year study, we investigated seasonal and spatial variability of methane dynamics in a eutrophied boreal estuary, both in the water column and underlying sediments. The estuary and the connected archipelago were consistently a source of methane to the atmosphere, although the origin of emitted methane varied with distance offshore. In the estuary, the river was the primary source of atmospheric methane. In contrast, in the adjacent archipelago, sedimentary methanogenesis fueled by eutrophication over previous decades was the main source. Methane emissions to the atmosphere from the study area were highly variable and dependent on local hydrodynamics and environmental conditions. Despite evidence of highly active methanogenesis in the studied sediments, the vast majority of the upwards diffusive flux of methane was removed before it could escape to the atmosphere, indicating that oxidative filters are presently still functioning regardless of previous eutrophication and ongoing climate change.
  • Jokinen, Sami A.; Jilbert, Tom; Tiihonen-Filppula, Rosa; Koho, Karoliina (2020)
    Coastal sediments play a fundamental role in processing anthropogenic trace metal inputs. Previous studies have shown that terrestrial organic matter (OM) is a significant vector for trace metal transport across the land-to-sea continuum, but little is known about the fate of land-derived metal-OM complexes in coastal sediments. Here, we use a comprehensive set of sediment pore water and solid-phase analyses to investigate how variations in terrestrial OM delivery since the 1950s have influenced trace metal accumulation and diagenesis in a human-impacted boreal estuary in the northern Baltic Sea. A key feature of our dataset is a strong correlation between terrestrial OM deposition and accumulation of metal-OM complexes in the sediments. Based on this strong coupling, we infer that the riverine input of terrestrial metal-OM complexes from the hinterland, followed by flocculation-induced settling in the estuary, effectively modulates sedimentary trace metal sequestration. While part of the trace metal pool associated with these complexes is efficiently recycled in the surface sediments during diagenesis, a substantial fraction is permanently buried as refractory metal-OM complexes or through incorporation into insoluble sulfides, thereby escaping further biological processing. These findings suggest that terrestrial OM input could play a more pivotal role in trace metal processing in coastal environments than hitherto acknowledged. (c) 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.