Browsing by Subject "Height"

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  • Bogl, Leonie H.; Jelenkovic, Aline; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Ahrenfeldt, Linda; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Stazi, Maria A.; Fagnani, Corrado; D'Ippolito, Cristina; Hur, Yoon-Mi; Jeong, Hoe-Uk; Silberg, Judy L.; Eaves, Lindon J.; Maes, Hermine H.; Bayasgalan, Gombojav; Narandalai, Danshiitsoodol; Cutler, Tessa L.; Kandler, Christian; Jang, Kerry L.; Christensen, Kaare; Skytthe, Axel; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Cozen, Wendy; Hwang, Amie E.; Mack, Thomas M.; Derom, Catherine A.; Vlietinck, Robert F.; Nelson, Tracy L.; Whitfield, Keith E.; Corley, Robin P.; Huibregtse, Brooke M.; McAdams, Tom A.; Eley, Thalia C.; Gregory, Alice M.; Krueger, Robert F.; Mcgue, Matt; Pahlen, Shandell; Willemsen, Gonneke; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, Toos C. E. M.; Pang, Zengchang; Tan, Qihua; Zhang, Dongfeng; Martin, Nicholas G.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hjelmborg, Jacob van B.; Rebato, Esther; Swan, Gary E.; Krasnow, Ruth; Busjahn, Andreas; Lichtenstein, Paul; Oncel, Sevgi Y.; Aliev, Fazil; Baker, Laura A.; Tuvblad, Catherine; Siribaddana, Sisira H.; Hotopf, Matthew; Sumathipala, Athula; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Aslan, Anna K. Dahl; Ordonana, Juan R.; Sanchez-Romera, Juan F.; Colodro-Conde, Lucia; Duncan, Glen E.; Buchwald, Dedra; Tarnoki, Adam D.; Tarnoki, David L.; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Hopper, John L.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Silventoinen, Karri; Kaprio, Jaakko (2017)
    Background: The comparison of traits in twins from opposite-sex (OS) and same-sex (SS) dizygotic twin pairs is considered a proxy measure of prenatal hormone exposure. To examine possible prenatal hormonal influences on anthropometric traits, we compared mean height, body mass index (BMI), and the prevalence of being overweight or obese between men and women from OS and SS dizygotic twin pairs. Methods: The data were derived from the COllaborative project of Development of Anthropometrical measures in Twins (CODATwins) database, and included 68,494 SS and 53,808 OS dizygotic twin individuals above the age of 20 years from 31 twin cohorts representing 19 countries. Zygosity was determined by questionnaires or DNA genotyping depending on the study. Multiple regression and logistic regression models adjusted for cohort, age, and birth year with the twin type as a predictor were carried out to compare height and BMI in twins from OS pairs with those from SS pairs and to calculate the adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for being overweight or obese. Results: OS females were, on average, 0.31 cm (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20, 0.41) taller than SS females. OS males were also, on average, taller than SS males, but this difference was only 0.14 cm (95% CI 0.02, 0.27). Mean BMI and the prevalence of overweight or obesity did not differ between males and females from SS and OS twin pairs. The statistically significant differences between OS and SS twins for height were small and appeared to reflect our large sample size rather than meaningful differences of public health relevance. Conclusions: We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that prenatal hormonal exposure or postnatal socialization (i.e., having grown up with a twin of the opposite sex) has a major impact on height and BMI in adulthood.
  • Bogl, Leonie H; Jelenkovic, Aline; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Ahrenfeldt, Linda; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Stazi, Maria A; Fagnani, Corrado; D’Ippolito, Cristina; Hur, Yoon-Mi; Jeong, Hoe-Uk; Silberg, Judy L; Eaves, Lindon J; Maes, Hermine H; Bayasgalan, Gombojav; Narandalai, Danshiitsoodol; Cutler, Tessa L; Kandler, Christian; Jang, Kerry L; Christensen, Kaare; Skytthe, Axel; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Cozen, Wendy; Hwang, Amie E; Mack, Thomas M; Derom, Catherine A; Vlietinck, Robert F; Nelson, Tracy L; Whitfield, Keith E; Corley, Robin P; Huibregtse, Brooke M; McAdams, Tom A; Eley, Thalia C; Gregory, Alice M; Krueger, Robert F; McGue, Matt; Pahlen, Shandell; Willemsen, Gonneke; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, Toos C E M; Pang, Zengchang; Tan, Qihua; Zhang, Dongfeng; Martin, Nicholas G; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Hjelmborg, Jacob v B; Rebato, Esther; Swan, Gary E; Krasnow, Ruth; Busjahn, Andreas; Lichtenstein, Paul; Öncel, Sevgi Y; Aliev, Fazil; Baker, Laura A; Tuvblad, Catherine; Siribaddana, Sisira H; Hotopf, Matthew; Sumathipala, Athula; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Aslan, Anna K D; Ordoñana, Juan R; Sánchez-Romera, Juan F; Colodro-Conde, Lucia; Duncan, Glen E; Buchwald, Dedra; Tarnoki, Adam D; Tarnoki, David L; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Hopper, John L; Loos, Ruth J F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Silventoinen, Karri; Kaprio, Jaakko (BioMed Central, 2017)
    Abstract Background The comparison of traits in twins from opposite-sex (OS) and same-sex (SS) dizygotic twin pairs is considered a proxy measure of prenatal hormone exposure. To examine possible prenatal hormonal influences on anthropometric traits, we compared mean height, body mass index (BMI), and the prevalence of being overweight or obese between men and women from OS and SS dizygotic twin pairs. Methods The data were derived from the COllaborative project of Development of Anthropometrical measures in Twins (CODATwins) database, and included 68,494 SS and 53,808 OS dizygotic twin individuals above the age of 20 years from 31 twin cohorts representing 19 countries. Zygosity was determined by questionnaires or DNA genotyping depending on the study. Multiple regression and logistic regression models adjusted for cohort, age, and birth year with the twin type as a predictor were carried out to compare height and BMI in twins from OS pairs with those from SS pairs and to calculate the adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for being overweight or obese. Results OS females were, on average, 0.31 cm (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20, 0.41) taller than SS females. OS males were also, on average, taller than SS males, but this difference was only 0.14 cm (95% CI 0.02, 0.27). Mean BMI and the prevalence of overweight or obesity did not differ between males and females from SS and OS twin pairs. The statistically significant differences between OS and SS twins for height were small and appeared to reflect our large sample size rather than meaningful differences of public health relevance. Conclusions We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that prenatal hormonal exposure or postnatal socialization (i.e., having grown up with a twin of the opposite sex) has a major impact on height and BMI in adulthood.
  • Ivanovski, Ivan; Djuric, Olivera; Broccoli, Serena; Caraffi, Stefano Giuseppe; Accorsi, Patrizia; Adam, Margaret P.; Avela, Kristiina; Badura-Stronka, Magdalena; Bayat, Allan; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Cocco, Isabella; Cordelli, Duccio Maria; Cuturilo, Goran; Di Pisa, Veronica; Garcia, Juliette Dupont; Gastaldi, Roberto; Giordano, Lucio; Guala, Andrea; Hoei-Hansen, Christina; Inaba, Mie; Iodice, Alessandro; Nielsen, Jens Erik Klint; Kuburovic, Vladimir; Lazalde-Medina, Brissia; Malbora, Baris; Mizuno, Seiji; Moldovan, Oana; Moller, Rikke S.; Muschke, Petra; Otelli, Valeria; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Piscopo, Carmelo; Poch-Olive, Maria Luisa; Prpic, Igor; Reina, Purificacion Marin; Raviglione, Federico; Ricci, Emilia; Scarano, Emanuela; Simonte, Graziella; Smigiel, Robert; Tanteles, George; Tarani, Luigi; Trimouille, Aurelien; Valera, Elvis Terci; Vergano, Samantha Schrier; Writzl, Karin; Callewaert, Bert; Savasta, Salvatore; Street, Maria Elisabeth; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Bernasconi, Sergio; Rossi, Paolo Giorgi; Garavelli, Livia (2020)
    Background Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS; OMIM #235730) is a genetic condition caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions of theZEB2gene. It is characterized by moderate-severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, Hirschsprung disease and multiple organ malformations of which congenital heart defects and urogenital anomalies are the most frequent ones. To date, a clear description of the physical development of MWS patients does not exist. The aim of this study is to provide up-to-date growth charts specific for infants and children with MWS. Charts for males and females aged from 0 to 16 years were generated using a total of 2865 measurements from 99 MWS patients of different ancestries. All data were collected through extensive collaborations with the Italian MWS association (AIMW) and the MWS Foundation. The GAMLSS package for the R statistical computing software was used to model the growth charts. Height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and head circumference were compared to those from standard international growth charts for healthy children. Results In newborns, weight and length were distributed as in the general population, while head circumference was slightly smaller, with an average below the 30th centile. Up to the age of 7 years, weight and height distribution was shifted to slightly lower values than in the general population; after that, the difference increased further, with 50% of the affected children below the 5th centile of the general population. BMI distribution was similar to that of non-affected children until the age of 7 years, at which point values in MWS children increased with a less steep slope, particularly in males. Microcephaly was sometimes present at birth, but in most cases it developed gradually during infancy; many children had a small head circumference, between the 3rd and the 10th centile, rather than being truly microcephalic (at least 2 SD below the mean). Most patients were of slender build. Conclusions These charts contribute to the understanding of the natural history of MWS and should assist pediatricians and other caregivers in providing optimal care to MWS individuals who show problems related to physical growth. This is the first study on growth in patients with MWS.
  • Laine, M. K.; Kautiainen, H.; Gissler, M.; Raina, M.; Aahos, I.; Jarvinen, K.; Eriksson, J. G. (2018)
    Objectives: Both short stature and adiposity are risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aim of this study was to simultaneously evaluate the importance of stature and degree of adiposity on development of GDM in primiparous women. Study design: Longitudinal cohort study. Methods: In the city of Vantaa, Finland, between 2009 and 2015, all together 7750 primiparous women without previously diagnosed diabetes mellitus gave birth. Of these, 5223 women were >= 18 years of age with information on height, weight, and complete data from a 75 g 2-h oral glucose tolerance test composing the study participants of this study. Results: A 155-cm tall woman with a body mass index (BMI) of 25.5 kg/m(2) had a similar risk for GDM as a 175-cm tall woman with a BMI of 27.1 kg/m(2). Women shorter than 159 cm had the highest prevalence of GDM, 28.7%, whereas women with height between 164 and 167 cm had the lowest prevalence of GDM, 19.9% (P <0.001). Height was inversely and significantly associated with both 1- and 2-h glucose values (both P <0.001). Conclusions: To avoid over diagnosis of GDM, an unbiased strategy is needed to determine and diagnose GDM in women with different stature and degree of adiposity. (c) 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.