Browsing by Subject "Hospital care"

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  • Virtanen, Eunice; Nurmi, Tapio; Soder, Per-Osten; Airila-Mansson, Stella; Soder, Birgitta; Meurman, Jukka H. (2017)
    Background: Periodontal disease associates with systemic diseases but corresponding links regarding apical periodontitis (AP) are not so clear. Hence our aim was to study association between AP and the prevalence of systemic diseases in a study population from Sweden. Methods: The subjects were 150 patients from a randomly selected epidemiological sample of 1676 individuals. 120 accepted to participate and their basic and clinical examination data were available for these secondary analyses where dental radiographs were used to record signs for endodontic treatments and AP. Periapical Index and modified Total Dental Index scores were calculated from the x-rays to classify the severity of AP and dental infection burden, respectively. Demographic and hospital record data were collected from the Swedish National Statistics Center. T-test, chi-square and univariate analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and regressions analyses were used for statistics. Results: Of the 120 patients 41% had AP and 61% had received endodontic treatments of which 52% were radiographically unsatisfactory. AP patients were older and half of them were smokers. AP and periodontitis often appeared in the same patient (32.5%). From all hospital diagnoses, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) were most common, showing 20.4% prevalence in AP patients. Regression analyses, controlled for age, gender, income, smoking and periodontitis, showed AP to associate with CVD with odds ratio 3.83 (95% confidence interval 1.18-12.40; p = 0.025). Conclusions: The results confirmed our hypothesis by showing that AP statistically associated with cardiovascular diseases. The finding that subjects with AP also often had periodontitis indicates an increased oral inflammatory burden.
  • Virtanen, Eunice; Nurmi, Tapio; Söder, Per-Östen; Airila-Månsson, Stella; Söder, Birgitta; Meurman, Jukka H. (BioMed Central, 2017)
    Abstract Background Periodontal disease associates with systemic diseases but corresponding links regarding apical periodontitis (AP) are not so clear. Hence our aim was to study association between AP and the prevalence of systemic diseases in a study population from Sweden. Methods The subjects were 150 patients from a randomly selected epidemiological sample of 1676 individuals. 120 accepted to participate and their basic and clinical examination data were available for these secondary analyses where dental radiographs were used to record signs for endodontic treatments and AP. Periapical Index and modified Total Dental Index scores were calculated from the x-rays to classify the severity of AP and dental infection burden, respectively. Demographic and hospital record data were collected from the Swedish National Statistics Center. T-test, chi-square and univariate analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and regressions analyses were used for statistics. Results Of the 120 patients 41% had AP and 61% had received endodontic treatments of which 52% were radiographically unsatisfactory. AP patients were older and half of them were smokers. AP and periodontitis often appeared in the same patient (32.5%). From all hospital diagnoses, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) were most common, showing 20.4% prevalence in AP patients. Regression analyses, controlled for age, gender, income, smoking and periodontitis, showed AP to associate with CVD with odds ratio 3.83 (95% confidence interval 1.18–12.40; p = 0.025). Conclusions The results confirmed our hypothesis by showing that AP statistically associated with cardiovascular diseases. The finding that subjects with AP also often had periodontitis indicates an increased oral inflammatory burden.
  • Raitio, Arimatias; Syvänen, Johanna; Tauriainen, Asta; Hyvärinen, Anna; Sankilampi, Ulla; Gissler, Mika; Helenius, Ilkka (2021)
    Congenital abdominal wall defects, namely, gastroschisis and omphalocele, are rare congenital malformations with significant morbidity. The long-term burden of these anomalies to families and health care providers has not previously been assessed. We aimed to determine the need for hospital admissions and the requirement for surgery after initial admission at birth. For our analyses, we identified all infants with either gastroschisis (n=178) or omphalocele (n=150) born between Jan 1, 1998, and Dec 31, 2014, in the Register of Congenital Malformations. The data on all hospital admissions and operations performed were acquired from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register between Jan 1, 1998, and Dec 31, 2015, and compared to data on the whole Finnish pediatric population (0.9 million) live born 1993-2008. Patients with gastroschisis and particularly those with omphalocele required hospital admissions 1.8 to 5.7 times more than the general pediatric population (p Conclusion: Patients with gastroschisis and especially those with omphalocele, are significantly more likely than the general pediatric population to require hospital care. Nevertheless, almost half of the patients can be treated without further surgery, and redo abdominal surgery is only required in a third of these children. What is Known: Gastroschisis and omphalocele are congenital malformations with significant morbidity There are no reports on the long-term need for hospital admissions and surgery in these children What is New: Patients with abdominal wall defects are significantly more likely than the general pediatric population to require hospital care Almost half of the patients can be treated without further surgery, and abdominal redo operations are only required in a third of these children