Browsing by Subject "IDDM"

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  • Finnish Pediat Diabet Register; Turtinen, Maaret; Härkönen, Taina; Parkkola, Anna; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael (2019)
    Aims/hypothesis In previous studies, the risk of developing familial type 1 diabetes has been reported to be more than two times higher in the offspring of affected fathers than in those of affected mothers. We tested the hypothesis that index children with an affected father may have a more aggressive disease process at diagnosis than those with other affected first-degree relatives. Methods A cross-sectional, observational study was performed using the Finnish Pediatric Diabetes Register. Clinical and metabolic characteristics, beta cell autoantibodies and HLA class II genetics were analysed from index children in Finland diagnosed before the age of 15 years between January 2003 and December 2016. Information on the presence of type 1 diabetes in first-degree relatives was collected at diagnosis using a structured questionnaire. Results Out of 4993 newly diagnosed index children, 519 (10.4%) had familial type 1 diabetes. More than 5% (n = 253, 5.1%) had an affected father, 2.8% (n = 141) had an affected mother, 1.9% (n = 95) had an affected sibling and 0.6% (n = 30) had two or more affected family members. All clinical and metabolic variables were markedly poorer in children with sporadic vs familial diabetes. The index children with an affected father or mother were younger than those with an affected sibling (median age 7.59 vs 6.74 vs 10.73 years, respectively; p <0.001). After age- and sex-adjusted analyses, index children with an affected father presented more often with ketoacidosis (9.7% vs 3.6%; p = 0.033) and had greater weight loss before diagnosis (3.2% vs 0%; p = 0.006) than those with an affected mother. Children with familial disease tested negative for all autoantibodies more often (3.5% vs 2.1%; p = 0.041) and had insulin autoantibodies more frequently (49.8% vs 42.2%; p = 0.004) than those with sporadic disease. Both major HLA risk haplotypes (DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8) were more often lacking among children with sporadic vs familial disease (15.9% vs 11.2%; p = 0.006). The DR4-DQ8 haplotype was more frequent in the familial vs the sporadic group (75.7% vs 68.5%; p = 0.001) and especially among children with an affected father when compared with children with sporadic disease (77.5% vs 68.5%; p <0.05). When comparing index children with affected parents diagnosed before or after the birth of the index child, a clear male preponderance was seen among the affected parents diagnosed before the birth of the index child (fathers 66.2% vs mothers 33.8%; p = 0.006), whereas the proportion of fathers and mothers was similar if type 1 diabetes was diagnosed after the birth of the index child. Conclusions/interpretation The more severe metabolic derangement at diagnosis in children with sporadic type 1 diabetes compared with those with familial type 1 diabetes was confirmed. The higher frequency of diabetic ketoacidosis and increased weight loss at diagnosis in index children with an affected father compared with an affected mother support the hypothesis that paternal type 1 diabetes is associated with more severe disease in the offspring than maternal diabetes. The sex difference seen between affected parents diagnosed before and after the birth of the index child supports the hypothesis that maternal insulin treatment protects against type 1 diabetes.
  • Koskinen, Maarit K.; Lempainen, Johanna; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Helminen, Olli; Hekkala, Anne; Härkönen, Taina; Kiviniemi, Minna; Simell, Olli; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma; Toppari, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta (2018)
    Context: A declining first-phase insulin response (FPIR) is characteristic of the disease process leading to clinical type 1 diabetes. It is not known whether reduced FPIR depends on class II human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype, islet autoimmunity, or both. Objective: To dissect the role of class II HLA DR-DQ genotypes and biochemical islet autoantibodies in the compromised FPIR. Design, Setting, Participants: A total of 438 children with defined HLA DR-DQ genotype in the prospective Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study were analyzed for FPIR in a total of 1149 intravenous glucose tolerance tests and were categorized by their HLA DR-DQ genotype and the number of biochemical islet autoantibodies at the time of the first FPIR. Age-adjusted hierarchical linear mixed models were used to analyze repeated measurements of FPIR. Main Outcome Measure: The associations between class II HLA DR-DQ genotype, islet autoantibody status, and FPIR. Results: A strong association between the degree of risk conferred by HLA DR-DQ genotype and positivity for islet autoantibodies existed (P <0.0001). FPIR was inversely associated with the number of biochemical autoantibodies (P <0.0001) irrespective of HLA DR-DQ risk group. FPIR decreased over time in children with multiple autoantibodies and increased in children with no biochemical autoantibodies (P <0.0001 and P = 0.0013, respectively). Conclusions: The class II HLA DR-DQ genotype association with FPIR was secondary to the association between HLA and islet autoimmunity. Declining FPIR was associated with positivity for multiple islet autoantibodies irrespective of class II HLA DR-DQ genotype.