Browsing by Subject "IDENTIFICATION"

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  • Salonen, Iines S.; Chronopoulou, Panagiota-Myrsini; Nomaki, Hidetaka; Langlet, Dewi; Tsuchiya, Masashi; Koho, Karoliina A. (2021)
    Foraminifera are unicellular eukaryotes that are an integral part of benthic fauna in many marine ecosystems, including the deep sea, with direct impacts on benthic biogeochemical cycles. In these systems, different foraminiferal species are known to have a distinct vertical distribution, i.e., microhabitat preference, which is tightly linked to the physico-chemical zonation of the sediment. Hence, foraminifera are well-adapted to thrive in various conditions, even under anoxia. However, despite the ecological and biogeochemical significance of foraminifera, their ecology remains poorly understood. This is especially true in terms of the composition and diversity of their microbiome, although foraminifera are known to harbor diverse endobionts, which may have a significant meaning to each species' survival strategy. In this study, we used 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding to investigate the microbiomes of five different deep-sea benthic foraminiferal species representing differing microhabitat preferences. The microbiomes of these species were compared intra- and inter-specifically, as well as with the surrounding sediment bacterial community. Our analysis indicated that each species was characterized with a distinct, statistically different microbiome that also differed from the surrounding sediment community in terms of diversity and dominant bacterial groups. We were also able to distinguish specific bacterial groups that seemed to be strongly associated with particular foraminiferal species, such as the family Marinilabiliaceae for Chilostomella ovoidea and the family Hyphomicrobiaceae for Bulimina subornata and Bulimina striata. The presence of bacterial groups that are tightly associated to a certain foraminiferal species implies that there may exist unique, potentially symbiotic relationships between foraminifera and bacteria that have been previously overlooked. Furthermore, the foraminifera contained chloroplast reads originating from different sources, likely reflecting trophic preferences and ecological characteristics of the different species. This study demonstrates the potential of 16S rRNA gene metabarcoding in resolving the microbiome composition and diversity of eukaryotic unicellular organisms, providing unique in situ insights into enigmatic deep-sea ecosystems.
  • Villaseñor-Altamirano, Ana B.; Watson, John D.; Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Yao, Cindy Q.; Boutros, Paul C.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Valdés-Flores, Jesús; Elizondo, Guillermo (2019)
    Alternative splicing is a co-transcriptional mechanism that generates protein diversity by including or excluding exons in different combinations, thereby expanding the diversity of protein isoforms of a single gene. Abnormalities in this process can result in deleterious effects to human health, and several xenobiotics are known to interfere with splicing regulation through multiple mechanisms. These changes could lead to human diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders, autoimmune diseases, and developmental disorders. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant generated as a byproduct of various industrial activities. Exposure to this dioxin has been linked to a wide range of pathologies through the alteration of multiple cellular processes. However, the effects of TCDD exposure on alternative splicing have not yet been studied. Here, we investigated whether a single po. dose of 5 μg/kg or 500 μg/kg TCDD influence hepatic alternative splicing in adult male C57BL/6Kou mouse. We identified several genes whose alternative splicing of precursor messenger RNAs was modified following TCDD exposure. In particular, we demonstrated that alternative splicing of Cyp1a1, Ahrr, and Actn1 was significantly altered after TCDD treatment. These findings show that the exposure to TCDD has an impact on alternative-splicing, and suggest a new avenue for understanding TCDD-mediated toxicity and pathogenesis.
  • Domanska, Ausra; Flatt, Justin Wayne; Jukonen, Joonas; Geraets, James; Butcher, Sarah Jane (2019)
    Human parechovirus 3 (HPeV3) infection is associated with sepsis characterized by significant immune activation and subsequent tissue damage in neonates. Strategies to limit infection have been unsuccessful due to inadequate molecular diagnostic tools for early detection and the lack of a vaccine or specific antiviral therapy. Toward the latter, we present a 2.8-angstrom-resolution structure of HPeV3 in complex with fragments from a neutralizing human monoclonal antibody, AT12-015, using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and image reconstruction. Modeling revealed that the epitope extends across neighboring asymmetric units with contributions from capsid proteins VP0, VP1, and VP3. Antibody decoration was found to block binding of HPeV3 to cultured cells. Additionally, at high resolution, it was possible to model a stretch of RNA inside the virion and, from this, identify the key features that drive and stabilize protein-RNA association during assembly. IMPORTANCE Human parechovirus 3 (HPeV3) is receiving increasing attention as a prevalent cause of sepsis-like symptoms in neonates, for which, despite the severity of disease, there are no effective treatments available. Structural and molecular insights into virus neutralization are urgently needed, especially as clinical cases are on the rise. Toward this goal, we present the first structure of HPeV3 in complex with fragments from a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. At high resolution, it was possible to precisely define the epitope that, when targeted, prevents virions from binding to cells. Such an atomic-level description is useful for understanding host-pathogen interactions and viral pathogenesis mechanisms and for finding potential cures for infection and disease.
  • Rantala, Juha K.; Makela, Rami; Aaltola, Anna-Riina; Laasola, Petra; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Nees, Matthias; Saviranta, Petri; Kallioniemi, Olli (2011)
  • DREAM SMC-Het Participants; Salcedo, Adriana; Mustonen, Ville (2020)
    Methods for reconstructing tumor evolution are benchmarked in the DREAM Somatic Mutation Calling Tumour Heterogeneity Challenge. Tumor DNA sequencing data can be interpreted by computational methods that analyze genomic heterogeneity to infer evolutionary dynamics. A growing number of studies have used these approaches to link cancer evolution with clinical progression and response to therapy. Although the inference of tumor phylogenies is rapidly becoming standard practice in cancer genome analyses, standards for evaluating them are lacking. To address this need, we systematically assess methods for reconstructing tumor subclonality. First, we elucidate the main algorithmic problems in subclonal reconstruction and develop quantitative metrics for evaluating them. Then we simulate realistic tumor genomes that harbor all known clonal and subclonal mutation types and processes. Finally, we benchmark 580 tumor reconstructions, varying tumor read depth, tumor type and somatic variant detection. Our analysis provides a baseline for the establishment of gold-standard methods to analyze tumor heterogeneity.
  • Clark, Christine; Palta, Priit; Joyce, Christopher J.; Scott, Carol; Grundberg, Elin; Deloukas, Panos; Palotie, Aarno; Coffey, Alison J. (2012)
  • Horesh, Gal; Blackwell, Grace A.; Tonkin-Hill, Gerry; Corander, Jukka; Heinz, Eva; Thomson, Nicholas R. (2021)
    Escherichia coli is a highly diverse organism that includes a range of commensal and pathogenic variants found across a range of niches and worldwide. In addition to causing severe intestinal and extraintestinal disease, E. coli is considered a priority pathogen due to high levels of observed drug resistance. The diversity in the E. coli population is driven by high genome plasticity and a very large gene pool. All these have made E. coli one of the most well- studied organisms, as well as a commonly used laboratory strain. Today, there are thousands of sequenced E. coli genomes stored in public databases. While data is widely available, accessing the information in order to perform analyses can still be a challenge. Collecting relevant available data requires accessing different sources, where data may be stored in a range of formats, and often requires further manipulation and processing to apply various analyses and extract useful information. In this study, we collated and intensely curated a collection of over 10 000 E. coli and Shigella genomes to provide a single, uniform, high- quality dataset. Shigella were included as they are considered specialized pathovars of E. coli. We provide these data in a number of easily accessible formats that can be used as the foundation for future studies addressing the biological differences between E. coli lineages and the distribution and flow of genes in the E. coli population at a high resolution. The analysis we present emphasizes our lack of understanding of the true diversity of the E. coli species, and the biased nature of our current understanding of the genetic diversity of such a key pathogen.
  • Spirin, Viacheslav; Malysheva, Vera; Roberts, Peter; Trichies, Gérard; Savchenko, Anton; Larsson, Karl-Henrik (2019)
    Morphological and DNA data show that effused representatives of the Auriculariales (Basidiomycota) with sphaeropedunculate basidia belong to eleven genera of which seven are dealt with in this study. Among them, Myxarium is the largest genus containing 21 accepted species of which nine are reintroduced below and five are described as new. Protodontia is limited to three species only, P. subgelatinosa (the generic type) and two newly described species from Africa. Protoacia is a new monotypic genus for P. delicata, sp. nov., widely distributed on coniferous hosts in Eurasia. Myxariellum is erected for two new species with smooth hymenophore from northwestern North America while Gelacantha is introduced for G. pura, a new species with hydnoid hymenophore from Caucasus. Our data do not confirm the present synonymy of Sebacina sphaerospora with Tremella glaira, and these species are placed in two separate genera - Hydrophana, gen. nov., and Ofella, gen. nov., respectively. A key to European Myxarium and similar-looking species is included.
  • Okutachi, Sunday; Manoharan, Ganesh Babu; Kiriazis, Alexandros; Laurini, Christina; Catillon, Marie; McCormick, Frank; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Abankwa, Daniel (2021)
    Recently, the highly mutated oncoprotein K-Ras4B (hereafter K-Ras) was shown to drive cancer cell stemness in conjunction with calmodulin (CaM). We previously showed that the covalent CaM inhibitor ophiobolin A (OphA) can potently inhibit K-Ras stemness activity. However, OphA, a fungus-derived natural product, exhibits an unspecific, broad toxicity across all phyla. Here we identified a less toxic, functional analog of OphA that can efficiently inactivate CaM by covalent inhibition. We analyzed a small series of benzazulenones, which bear some structural similarity to OphA and can be synthesized in only six steps. We identified the formyl aminobenzazulenone 1, here named Calmirasone1, as a novel and potent covalent CaM inhibitor. Calmirasone1 has a 4-fold increased affinity for CaM as compared to OphA and was active against K-Ras in cells within minutes, as compared to hours required by OphA. Calmirasone1 displayed a 2.5-4.5-fold higher selectivity for KRAS over BRAF mutant 3D spheroid growth than OphA, suggesting improved relative on-target activity. Importantly, Calmirasone1 has a 40-260-fold lower unspecific toxic effect on HRAS mutant cells, while it reaches almost 50% of the activity of novel K-RasG12C specific inhibitors in 3D spheroid assays. Our results suggest that Calmirasone1 can serve as a new tool compound to further investigate the cancer cell biology of the K-Ras and CaM associated stemness activities.
  • Novakovic, Bojan; Tsirvoulis, Georgios; Granvik, Mikael; Todovic, Ana (2017)
    We report the discovery of a new asteroid family among the dark asteroids residing in the Phocaea region the Tamara family. We make use of available physical data to separate asteroids in the region according to their surface reflectance properties, and establish the membership of the family. We determine the slope of the cumulative magnitude distribution of the family, and find it to be significantly steeper than the corresponding slope of all the asteroids in the Phocaea region. This implies that subkilometer dark Phocaeas are comparable in number to bright S-type objects, shedding light on an entirely new aspect of the composition of small Phocaea asteroids. We then use the Yarkovsky V-shape based method and estimate the age of the family to be 264 +/- 43Myr. Finally, we carry out numerical simulations of the dynamical evolution of the Tamara family. The results suggest that up to 50 Tamara members with absolute magnitude H <19.4 may currently be found in the near-Earth region. Despite their relatively small number in the near-Earth space, the rate of Earth impacts by small, dark Phocaeas is non-negligible.
  • Crespo, L.C.; Domenech, M; Enguídanos, A.; Malumbres-Olarte, Jagoba; Cardoso, Pedro; Moya-Larano, J; Frias-Lopez, Cristina; Macias Hernandez, Nuria Esther; de Mas, Eva; Mazzuca, Paola; Mora, E.; Opatova, Vera; Planas, Enric; Ribera, Carles; Roca-Cusachs, M.; Ruiz, D.; Sousa, Pedro; Tonzo, V.; Arnedo, M.A. (2018)
    Background A large scale semi-quantitative biodiversity assessment was conducted in white oak woodlands in areas included in the Spanish Network of National Parks, as part of a project aimed at revealing biogeographic patterns and identify biodiversity drivers. The semi-quantitative COBRA sampling protocol was conducted in sixteen 1-ha plots across six national parks using a nested design. All adult specimens were identified to species level based on morphology. Uncertain delimitations and identifications due to either limited information of diagnostic characters or conflicting taxonomy were further investigated using DNA barcode information. New information We identified 376 species belonging to 190 genera in 39 families, from the 8,521 adults found amongst the 20,539 collected specimens. Faunistic results include the discovery of 7 new species to the Iberian Peninsula, 3 new species to Spain and 11 putative new species to science. As largely expected by environmental features, the southern parks showed a higher proportion of Iberian and Mediterranean species than the northern parks, where the Palearctic elements were largely dominant. The analysis of approximately 3,200 DNA barcodes generated in the present study, corroborated and provided finer resolution to the morphologically based delimitation and identification of specimens in some taxonomically challenging families. Specifically, molecular data confirmed putative new species with diagnosable morphology, identified overlooked lineages that may constitute new species, confirmed assignment of specimens of unknown sexes to species and identified cases of misidentifications and phenotypic polymorphisms.
  • Gatta, Viviana; Tomašič, Tihomir; Ilaš, Janez; Zidar, Nace; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija; Barančoková, Michaela; Frlan, Rok; Anderluh, Marko; Kikelj, Danijel; Tammela, Päivi (2020)
    Quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial communication strategy, has been recognized as one of the control mechanisms of virulence in bacteria. Thus, targeting QS offers an interesting opportunity to impair bacterial pathogenicity and develop antivirulence agents. Aiming to enhance the discovery of QS inhibitors, we developed a bioreporter Escherichia coli JW5505 pET-Plsrlux and set up a cell-based assay for identifying inhibitors of autoinducer-2 (AI-2)-mediated QS. A comparative study on the performance of target- versus cell-based assays was performed, and 91 compounds selected with the potential to target the ATP binding pocket of LsrK, a key enzyme in AI-2 processing, were tested in an LsrK inhibition assay, providing 36 hits. The same set of compounds was tested by the AI-2-mediated QS interference assay, resulting in 24 active compounds. Among those, six were also found to be active against LsrK, whereas 18 might target other components of the pathway. Thus, this AI-2-mediated QS interference cell-based assay is an effective tool for complementing target-based assays, yet also stands as an independent assay for primary screening.
  • Gupta, Abhishekh; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero (2020)
    Accurate quantification of drug effects is crucial for identifying pharmaceutically actionable cancer vulnerabilities. Current cell viability-based measurements often lead to biased response estimates due to varying growth rates and experimental artifacts that explain part of the inconsistency in high-throughput screening results. We developed an improved drug scoring model, normalized drug response (NDR), which makes use of both positive and negative control conditions to account for differences in cell growth rates, and experimental noise to better characterize drug-induced effects. We demonstrate an improved consistency and accuracy of NDR compared to existing metrics in assessing drug responses of cancer cells in various culture models and experimental setups. Notably, NDR reliably captures both toxicity and viability responses, and differentiates a wider spectrum of drug behavior, including lethal, growth-inhibitory and growth-stimulatory modes, based on a single viability readout. The method will therefore substantially reduce the time and resources required in cell-based drug sensitivity screening. Abhishekh Gupta et al. present a normalized drug response (NDR) metric for accurate quantification of drug sensitivity in cell-based high-throughput assays. They show that NDR captures both toxicity and viability responses to improve drug effect classification over existing methods.
  • Hytönen, Marjo Kristiina; Arumilli, Meharji; Lappalainen, Anu K.; Kallio, Heli; Snellman, Marjatta; Sainio, Kirsi; Lohi, Hannes (2012)
  • Salo, Tuula; Sutinen, Meeri; Apu, Ehsanul Hoque; Sundquist, Elias; Cervigne, Nilva K.; de Oliveira, Carine Ervolino; Akram, Saad Ullah; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Suomi, Fumi; Eklund, Lauri; Juusela, Pirjo; Astrom, Pirjo; Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante; Santala, Markku; Savolainen, Kalle; Korvala, Johanna; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Coletta, Ricardo D. (2015)
    Background: The composition of the matrix molecules is important in in vitro cell culture experiments of e.g. human cancer invasion and vessel formation. Currently, the mouse Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) sarcoma -derived products, such as Matrigel (R), are the most commonly used tumor microenvironment (TME) mimicking matrices for experimental studies. However, since Matrigel (R) is non-human in origin, its molecular composition does not accurately simulate human TME. We have previously described a solid 3D organotypic myoma disc invasion assay, which is derived from human uterus benign leiomyoma tumor. Here, we describe the preparation and analyses of a processed, gelatinous leiomyoma matrix, named Myogel. Methods: A total protein extract, Myogel, was formulated from myoma. The protein contents of Myogel were characterized and its composition and properties compared with a commercial mouse Matrigel (R). Myogel was tested and compared to Matrigel (R) in human cell adhesion, migration, invasion, colony formation, spheroid culture and vessel formation experiments, as well as in a 3D hanging drop video image analysis. Results: We demonstrated that only 34 % of Myogel's molecular content was similar to Matrigel (R). All test results showed that Myogel was comparable with Matrigel (R), and when mixed with low-melting agarose (Myogel-LMA) it was superior to Matrigel (R) in in vitro Transwell (R) invasion and capillary formation assays. Conclusions: In conclusion, we have developed a novel Myogel TME matrix, which is recommended for in vitro human cell culture experiments since it closely mimics the human tumor microenvironment of solid cancers.
  • Wondimu, Zenebech; Omrani, Shahin; Ishikawa, Taichi; Javed, Fawad; Oikawa, Yuko; Virtanen, Ismo; Juronen, Erkki; Ingerpuu, Sulev; Patarroyo, Manuel (2013)
  • Kortesoja, Maarit; Trofin, Raluca Elena; Hanski, Leena (2020)
    The obligate intracellular bacterium, Chlamydia pneumoniae, has been identified as a risk factor for several chronic inflammatory diseases in addition to respiratory tract infections. The dissemination of C. pneumoniae from respiratory tract to secondary sites of infection occurs via infected monocyte / macrophage line cells, in which C. pneumoniae can persist as an antibiotic-refractory phenotype. To allow more detailed studies on the epithelium-monocyte/macrophage transition of the infection, new in vitro bioassays are needed. To this end, a coculture system with human continuous cell lines was established. Respiratory epithelial HL cells were infected with C. pneumoniae and THP-1 monocytes were added into the cultures at 67 h post infection. After a 5 h coculture, THP-1 cells were collected with a biotinylated HLA antibody and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads and C. pneumoniae genome copy numbers in THP-1 determined by quantitative PCR. The assay was optimized for cell densities, incubation time, THP-1 separation technique and buffer composition, and its robustness was demonstrated by a Z' value of 0.6. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors: SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) and FR180204 (ERK inhibitor) suppressed the transfer of C. pneumoniae from HL to THP-1 cells, making them suitable positive controls for the assay. Based on analysis of separate steps of the process, the MAPK inhibitors suppress the bacterial entry to THP-1 cells. The transfer of C. pneumoniae from epithelium to phagocytes represents a crucial step in the establishment of persistent infections by this pathogen, and the presented methods enables future studies to block this process by therapeutic means.
  • Räisänen, Ismo T.; Heikkinen, Anna Maria; Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Tervahartiala, Taina; Pajukanta, Riitta; Silbereisen, Angelika; Bostanci, Nagihan; Sorsa, Timo (2019)
    Background This cross-sectional study aims to investigate if a point-of-care (PoC) test of active matrix metalloproteinase-8 (aMMP-8) predicts levels of inflammation amplifier triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) and its putative ligand the neutrophil peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 (PGLYRP1) in saliva. Methods Forty-seven adolescents, aged 15 to 17 years, were tested with aMMP-8 PoC test, which was followed by a full-mouth clinical examination of the assessment of periodontal, mucosal, and oral health. TREM-1 and PGLYRP1 levels were analyzed by ELISA. The immunofluorometric assay (IFMA) specific for aMMP-8 was used as the reference method. Results Fourteen saliva samples out of a total of 47 showed positivity for aMMP-8 PoC test. Both the TREM-1 and the aMMP-8 (IFMA) levels were significantly elevated among the aMMP-8 PoC test positives compared with the PoC test negatives (P <0.05). Moreover, aMMP-8 levels assessed by IFMA showed a strong positive correlation with TREM-1 levels in saliva (r = 0.777, P <0.001). The number of sites with a probing depth of >= 4 mm was significantly lower among the adolescents that had a negative aMMP-8 PoC test result, and TREM-1 levels <75 pg/mL (P <0.05). In contrast, adolescents with a positive aMMP-8 PoC test result (i.e., elevated aMMP-8 levels) together with elevated TREM-1 levels had a significantly higher number of periodontal pockets with >= 4 mm (P <0.001). Conclusion The present study validated usability of aMMP-8 PoC test for predicting "proinflammatory" salivary profile and periodontal health status in adolescents.
  • Webb, Anne; Cottage, Amanda; Wood, Thomas; Khamassi, Khalil; Hobbs, Douglas; Gostkiewicz, Krystyna; White, Mark; Khazaei, Hamid; Ali, Mohamed; Street, Daniel; Duc, Gerard; Stoddard, Fred L.; Maalouf, Fouad; Ogbonnaya, Francis C.; Link, Wolfgang; Thomas, Jane; O'Sullivan, Donal M. (2016)
    Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is a globally important nitrogen-fixing legume, which is widely grown in a diverse range of environments. In this work, we mine and validate a set of 845 SNPs from the aligned transcriptomes of two contrasting inbred lines. Each V. faba SNP is assigned by BLAST analysis to a single Medicago orthologue. This set of syntenically anchored polymorphisms were then validated as individual KASP assays, classified according to their informativeness and performance on a panel of 37 inbred lines, and the best performing 757 markers used to genotype six mapping populations. The six resulting linkage maps were merged into a single consensus map on which 687 SNPs were placed on six linkage groups, each presumed to correspond to one of the six V. faba chromosomes. This sequence-based consensus map was used to explore synteny with the most closely related crop species, lentil and the most closely related fully sequenced genome, Medicago. Large tracts of uninterrupted colinearity were found between faba bean and Medicago, making it relatively straightforward to predict gene content and order in mapped genetic interval. As a demonstration of this, we mapped a flower colour gene to a 2-cM interval of Vf chromosome 2 which was highly colinear with Mt3. The obvious candidate gene from 78 gene models in the collinear Medicago chromosome segment was the previously characterized MtWD40-1 gene controlling anthocyanin production in Medicago and resequencing of the Vf orthologue showed a putative causative deletion of the entire 50 end of the gene.
  • Pitkänen, H. H.; Kärki, M.; Niinikoski, H.; Tanner, L.; Näntö-Salonen, K.; Pikta, M.; Kopatz, W. F.; Zuurveld, M.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Brinkman, H. J. M.; Lassila, R. (2018)
    Introduction: Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI), a rare autosomal recessive transport disorder of cationic amino acids lysine, arginine and ornithine, affects intestines, lungs, liver and kidneys. LPI patients may display potentially life-threatening bleeding events, which are poorly understood. Aims: To characterize alterations in haemostatic and fibrinolytic variables associated with LPI. Methods: We enrolled 15 adult patients (8 female) and assessed the clinical ISTH/ SSC-BAT bleeding score (BS). A variety of metabolic and coagulation assays, including fibrin generation test derivatives, clotting time (CT) and clot lysis time (CLT), thromboelastometry (ROTEM), and PFA-100 and Calibrated Automated Thrombogram (CAT), were used. Results: All patients had mild-to-moderate renal insufficiency, and moderate bleeding tendency (BS 4) without spontaneous bleeds. Mild anaemia and thrombocytopenia occurred. Traditional clotting times were normal, but in contrast, CT in fibrin generation test, and especially ROTEM FIBTEM was abnormal. The patients showed impaired primary haemostasis in PFA, irrespective of normal von Willebrand factor activity, but together with lowered fibrinogen and FXIII. Thrombin generation (TG) was reduced in vitro, according to CAT-derived endogenous thrombin potential, but in vivo TG was enhanced in the form of circulating prothrombin fragment 1 and 2 values. Very high D-dimer and plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin (PAP) complex levels coincided with shortened CLT in vitro. Conclusions: Defective primary haemostasis, coagulopathy, fibrin abnormality (FIBTEM, CT and CLT), low TG in vitro and clearly augmented fibrinolysis (PAP and D-dimer) in vivo were all detected in LPI. Altered fibrin generation and hyperfibrinolysis were associated with the metabolic and renal defect, suggesting a pathogenetic link in LPI.