Browsing by Subject "IMPAIRED GLUCOSE-TOLERANCE"

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  • Acosta, Tania; Barengo, Noel C.; Arrieta, Astrid; Ricaurte, Carlos; Tuomilehto, Jaakko O. (2018)
    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) imposes a heavy public health burden in both developed and developing countries. It is necessary to understand the effect of T2D in different settings and population groups. This report aimed to present baseline characteristics of study participants in the demonstration area for the Type 2 Diabetes Prevention in Barranquilla and Juan Mina (DEMOJUAN) project after randomization and to compare their fasting and 2-hour glucose levels according to lifestyle and T2D risk factor levels. The DEMOJUAN project is a randomized controlled field trial. Study participants were recruited from study sites using population-wide screening using the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) questionnaire. All volunteers with FINDRISC of >= 13 points were invited to undergo an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Participant inclusion criteria for the upcoming field trial were either FINDRISC of >= 13 points and 2-hour post-challenge glucose level of 7.0 to 11.0mmol/L or FINDRISC of >= 13 points and fasting plasma glucose level of 6.1 to 6.9mmol/L. Lifestyle habits and risk factors for T2D were assessed by trained interviewers using a validated questionnaire. Among the 14,193 participants who completed the FINDRISC questionnaire, 35% (n=4915) had a FINDRISC score of >= 13 points and 47% (n=2306) agreed to undergo the OGTT. Approximately, 33% (n=772) of participants underwent the OGTT and met the entry criteria; these participants were randomized into 3 groups. There were no statistically significant differences found in anthropometric or lifestyle risk factors, distribution of the glucose metabolism categories, or other diabetes risk factors between the 3 groups (P>.05). Women with a past history of hyperglycaemia had significantly higher fasting glucose levels than those without previous hyperglycaemia (103 vs 99mg/dL; P Lifestyle habits and risk factors were evenly distributed among the 3 study groups. No differences were found in fasting or 2-hour glucose levels among different lifestyle or risk factor categories with the exception of body mass index, past history of hyperglycaemia, and age of 64 years in women.
  • Laine, Merja K.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Kujala, Urho M.; Wasenius, Niko S.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Backmand, Heli M.; Peltonen, Markku; Mertsalmi, Tuomas H.; Sarna, Seppo (2014)
  • Wehkalampi, Karoliina; Muurinen, Mari; Wirta, Sara Bruce; Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Hovi, Petteri; Järvenpää, Anna-Liisa; Eriksson, Johan G.; Andersson, Sture; Kere, Juha; Kajantie, Eero (2013)
  • Siitonen, Niina; Pulkkinen, Leena; Lindström, Jaana; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Eriksson, Johan G.; Venojarvi, Mika; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti (2011)
  • Jolle, Anne; Asvold, Bjorn Olav; Holmen, Jostein; Carlsen, Sven Magnus; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Bjorngaard, Johan Hakon; Midthjell, Kristian (2018)
    Objective Among individuals at high risk for diabetes identified through a population survey, we performed an intervention study with basic lifestyle advice aiming to prevent diabetes. Research design and methods Among 50 806 participants in the HUNT3 Survey (2006-2008), 5297 individuals with Finnish Diabetes Risc Score (FINDRISC >= 15 were invited to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and an education session with lifestyle advice, and 2634 (49.7%) attended. Among them, 2380 people without diabetes were included in the prevention study with repeated examinations and education sessions after 6, 12, and 24 months. We examined participation, diabetes incidence, glycemia, and adiposity during follow-up. Results Of 2380 participants, 1212 (50.9%) participated in >= 3 of the four examinations. Diabetes was detected in 3.5%, 3.1%, and 4.0% of individuals at the 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month examinations, respectively, indicating a 10.3% 2-year diabetes incidence. Mean (95% CI) increases from baseline to 2-year follow-up were 0.30 (0.29 to 0.32) percentage points (3.3 (3.2 to 3.5) mmol/mol) for Hemoglobin A 1c, 0.13 (0.10 to 0.16) mmol/L for fasting serum-glucose, 0.46 (0.36 to 0.56) mmol/L for 2-hour OGTT s-glucose, 0.30 (0.19 to 0.40) kg/m(2) forbody mass index (BMI) (all p<0.001) and -0.5 (-0.9 to -0.2) cm for waist circumference (p= 0.004), with broadly similar estimates by baseline age, sex, education, depressive symptoms, BMI, physical activity, and family history of diabetes. Only 206 (8.7%) participants had evidence of > 5% weight loss during follow-up; their fasting and 2-hour s-glucose did not increase, and HbA 1c increased less than in other participants. Conclusion Basic lifestyle advice given to high-risk individuals during three group sessions with 6-month intervals was not effective in reducing 2-year diabetes risk.
  • Masalin, Senja; Rönö, Kristiina; Kautiainen, Hannu; Gissler, Mika; Eriksson, Johan G.; Laine, Merja K. (2019)
    AimsTo assess the relationship between body surface area (BSA) at birth and future risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).MethodsThis is an observational cohort study from Vantaa, Finland. The cohort included 1548 Finnish primiparous women, aged 15-28 years, without pre-existing diabetes, who gave birth 2009-2015. All women were born full-term and had complete information about their birth weight and length, from the Finnish Medical Birth Register. Additional data for the study were provided by individual patient health records and Statistics Finland. Study participants were divided into five levels (I-V) according to BSA at birth, based on normal distribution.ResultsThere was an inverse association between BSA at birth and risk for GDM (p=0.015 for linearity, after adjustments for age, educational attainment, pre-pregnancy BMI and smoking). The odds ratio (OR) for GDM in level V, with the largest BSA at birth, compared with level I, with the smallest BSA at birth, was 0.43 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.83]; adjusted for age, educational attainment, pre-pregnancy body mass index and smoking. The OR for GDM was 0.8 (95% CI 0.68-0.95, p=0.009) for each one standard deviation increase in BSA at birth, adjusted for the same confounders. BSA at birth correlated with adult anthropometry: correlation coefficients were r=0.16 (95% CI 0.11-0.21) for weight, r=0.31 (95% CI 0.26-0.35) for height, and r=0.06 (95% CI 0.01-0.11) for BMI.ConclusionsBody surface area at birth is inversely associated with future risk for GDM in primiparous women.
  • Laine, M. K.; Kujala, R.; Eriksson, J. G.; Kautiainen, H.; Sarna, S.; Kujala, U. M. (2017)
    Aims Regular physical activity plays a major role, in both prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. Less is known whether vigorous physical activity during young adulthood is associated with costs of diabetes medication in later life. The aim of this study is to evaluate this question. Methods The study population consisted of 1314 former elite-class athletes and 860 matched controls. The former athletes were divided into three groups based on their active career sport: endurance, mixed and power sports. Information on purchases of diabetes medication between 1995 and 2009 was obtained from the drug purchase register of the Finnish Social Insurance Institution. Results The total cost of diabetes medication per person year was significantly lower among the former endurance (mean 81 theta [95% CI 33-151 theta ]) and mixed group athletes (mean 272 theta [95% CI 181- 388 theta]) compared with the controls (mean 376 theta [95% CI 284- 485 theta]), (p <0.001 and p = 0.045, respectively). Of the former endurance athletes, 0.4% used insulin, while 5.2% of the controls used insulin (p = 0.018). Conclusions A career as former endurance, sprint, jumper or team game athlete seems to reduce the costs of diabetes medication in later life.
  • Eriksson, Johan G. (2019)
    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a major, rapidly increasing global public health challenge. The major risk factors for T2D include overweight and obesity, lifestyle-related factors and genetic factors. Early life exposures shape the developmental trajectories and alter susceptibility to T2D. Based on epidemiological studies it has been suggested that fetal undernutrition plays a role in the etiology of T2D. A low birth weight has been considered a proxy for fetal undernutrition. A meta-analysis reported that a 1 kg increase in birth weight is associated with a roughly 20% lower risk of T2D. Although fetal life is of major importance for future health, the period spanning the first 1000 days of life, is characterized by great plasticity and largely influencing later health. Different growth trajectories during this time period have also been associated with an increased risk of T2D. Studies assessing the association between age at BMI rebound in childhood and later risk for T2D have reported a fivefold difference in T2D according to age at BMI rebound. Developmental and epidemiological cohort studies focusing on T2D have major public health implications supporting a paradigm shift; a shift from focusing upon risk factor modification in adult life to adopting a life course perspective when studying T2D. This paradigm shift will not only help us in getting a better understanding of the pathophysiology underlying T2D, but it will also open new possibilities and opportunities in the prevention of T2D and related disorders.
  • Lehtisalo, Jenni; Lindstrom, Jaana; Ngandu, Tiia; Kivipelto, Miia; Ahtiluoto, Satu; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Eriksson, Johan G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Luchsinger, Jose A.; Finnish Diabet Prevention Study DP (2016)
    BackgroundType 2 diabetes is linked with cognitive dysfunction and dementia in epidemiological studies, but these observations are limited by lack of data on the exact timing of diabetes onset. We investigated diabetes, dysglycaemia, and cognition in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, in which the timing and duration of diabetes are well documented. MethodsThe Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study comprised middle-aged, overweight participants with impaired glucose tolerance but no diabetes at baseline (n=522), randomized to lifestyle intervention or a control group. After an intervention period (mean duration 4years) and follow-up (additional 9years), cognitive assessment with the CERAD test battery and Trail Making Test A (TMT) was executed twice within a 2-year interval. Of the 364 (70%) participants with cognitive assessments, 171 (47%) had developed diabetes. ResultsCognitive function did not differ between those who developed diabetes and those who did not. Lower mean 2-h glucose at an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and HbA(1C) during the intervention period predicted better performance in the TMT (p=0.012 and 0.024, respectively). Those without diabetes or with short duration of diabetes improved in CERAD total score between the two assessments (p=0.001) whereas those with long duration of diabetes did not (p=0.844). ConclusionsBetter glycemic control among persons with baseline impaired glucose tolerance predicted better cognitive performance 9years later in this secondary analysis of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study population. In addition, learning effects in cognitive testing were not evident in people with long diabetes duration. Copyright (c) 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • Bahijri, Suhad; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa; Ajabnoor, Ghada; Jambi, Hanan; Al Ahmadi, Jawaher; Borai, Anwar; Barengo, Noël C; Tuomilehto, Jaakko (2020)
    Abstract Aims/Introduction To develop a non-invasive risk score to identify Saudis having prediabetes or undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. Methods Adult Saudis without diabetes were recruited randomly using a stratified two-stage cluster sampling method. Demographic, dietary, lifestyle variables, personal and family medical history were collected using a questionnaire. Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were taken. Body mass index was calculated. The 1-h oral glucose tolerance test was carried out. Glycated hemoglobin, fasting and 1-h plasma glucose were measured, and obtained values were used to define prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (dysglycemia). Logistic regression models were used for assessing the association between various factors and dysglycemia, and Hosmer?Lemeshow summary statistics were used to assess the goodness-of-fit. Results A total of 791 men and 612 women were included, of whom 69 were found to have diabetes, and 259 had prediabetes. The prevalence of dysglycemia was 23%, increasing with age, reaching 71% in adults aged ≥65 years. In univariate analysis age, body mass index, waist circumference, use of antihypertensive medication, history of hyperglycemia, low physical activity, short sleep and family history of diabetes were statistically significant. The final model for the Saudi Diabetes Risk Score constituted sex, age, waist circumference, history of hyperglycemia and family history of diabetes, with the score ranging from 0 to 15. Its fit based on assessment using the receiver operating characteristic curve was good, with an area under the curve of 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.73?0.79). The proposed cut-point for dysglycemia is 5 or 6, with sensitivity and specificity being approximately 0.7. Conclusion The Saudi Diabetes Risk Score is a simple tool that can effectively distinguish Saudis at high risk of dysglycemia.
  • Langenberg, Claudia; Sharp, Stephen J.; Franks, Paul W.; Scott, Robert A.; Deloukas, Panos; Forouhi, Nita G.; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C.; Hansen, Torben; Palla, Luigi; Pedersen, Oluf; Schulze, Matthias B.; Tormo, Maria-Jose; Wheeler, Eleanor; Agnoli, Claudia; Arriola, Larraitz; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Clarke, Geraldine M.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Duell, Eric J.; Fagherazzi, Guy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kerrison, Nicola D.; Key, Timothy J.; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kroeger, Janine; Lajous, Martin; Morris, Andrew P.; Navarro, Carmen; Nilsson, Peter M.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quiros, J. Ramon; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Slimani, Nadia; Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Barroso, Ines; McCarthy, Mark I.; Riboli, Elio; Wareham, Nicholas J. (2014)
  • Charvat, Hadrien; Goto, Atsushi; Goto, Maki; Inoue, Machiko; Heianza, Yoriko; Arase, Yasuji; Sone, Hirohito; Nakagami, Tomoko; Song, Xin; Qiao, Qing; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Inoue, Manami (2015)
    Aims/IntroductionTo provide age- and sex-specific trends, age-standardized trends, and projections of diabetes prevalence through the year 2030 in the Japanese adult population. Materials and MethodsIn the present meta-regression analysis, we included 161,087 adults from six studies and nine national health surveys carried out between 1988 and 2011 in Japan. We assessed the prevalence of diabetes using a recorded history of diabetes or, for the population of individuals without known diabetes, either a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.5% (48mmol/mol) or the 1999 World Health Organization criteria (i.e., a fasting plasma glucose level of 126mg/dL and/or 2-h glucose level of 200mg/dL in the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test). ResultsFor both sexes, prevalence appeared to remain unchanged over the years in all age categories except for men aged 70years or older, in whom a significant increase in prevalence with time was observed. Age-standardized diabetes prevalence estimates based on the Japanese population of the corresponding year showed marked increasing trends: diabetes prevalence was 6.1% among women (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.5-6.7), 9.9% (95% CI 9.2-10.6) among men, and 7.9% (95% CI 7.5-8.4) among the total population in 2010, and was expected to rise by 2030 to 6.7% (95% CI 5.2-9.2), 13.1% (95% CI 10.9-16.7) and 9.8% (95% CI 8.5-12.0), respectively. In contrast, the age-standardized diabetes prevalence using a fixed population appeared to remain unchanged. ConclusionsThis large-scale meta-regression analysis shows that a substantial increase in diabetes prevalence is expected in Japan during the next few decades, mainly as a result of the aging of the adult population.
  • Penn, Linda; White, Martin; Lindstrom, Jaana; den Boer, Annemieke Th.; Blaak, Ellen; Eriksson, Johan G.; Feskens, Edith; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Walker, Mark; Mathers, John C.; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko (2013)
  • de Mello, Vanessa D.; Paananen, Jussi; Lindstrom, Jaana; Lankinen, Maria A.; Shi, Lin; Kuusisto, Johanna; Pihlajamaki, Jussi; Auriola, Seppo; Lehtonen, Marko; Rolandsson, Olov; Bergdahl, Ingvar A.; Nordin, Elise; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Landberg, Rikard; Eriksson, Johan G.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hanhineva, Kati; Uusitupa, Matti (2017)
    Wide-scale profiling technologies including metabolomics broaden the possibility of novel discoveries related to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). By applying non-targeted metabolomics approach, we investigated here whether serum metabolite profile predicts T2D in a well-characterized study population with impaired glucose tolerance by examining two groups of individuals who took part in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS); those who either early developed T2D (n = 96) or did not convert to T2D within the 15-year follow-up (n = 104). Several novel metabolites were associated with lower likelihood of developing T2D, including indole and lipid related metabolites. Higher indolepropionic acid was associated with reduced likelihood of T2D in the DPS. Interestingly, in those who remained free of T2D, indolepropionic acid and various lipid species were associated with better insulin secretion and sensitivity, respectively. Furthermore, these metabolites were negatively correlated with low-grade inflammation. We replicated the association between indolepropionic acid and T2D risk in one Finnish and one Swedish population. We suggest that indolepropionic acid, a gut microbiota-produced metabolite, is a potential biomarker for the development of T2D that may mediate its protective effect by preservation of alpha-cell function. Novel lipid metabolites associated with T2D may exert their effects partly through enhancing insulin sensitivity.
  • Hovatta, Iiris; de Mello, Vanessa D. F.; Kananen, Laura; Lindstrom, Jaana; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Peltonen, Markku; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti (2012)
  • Suvitaival, Tommi; Bondia-Pons, Isabel; Yetukuri, Laxman; Pöhö, Päivi; Nolan, John J.; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Kuusisto, Johanna; Oresic, Matej (2018)
    Background. There is a need for early markers to track and predict the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from the state of normal glucose tolerance through prediabetes. In this study we tested whether the plasma molecular lipidome has biomarker potential to predicting the onset of T2DM. Methods. We applied global lipidomic profiling on plasma samples from well-phenotyped men (107 cases, 216 controls) participating in the longitudinal METSIM study at baseline and at five-year follow-up. To validate the lipid markers, an additional study with a representative sample of adult male population (n = 631) was also conducted. A total of 277 plasma lipids were analyzed using the lipidomics platform based on ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Lipids with the highest predictive power for the development of T2DM were computationally selected, validated and compared to standard risk models without lipids. Results. A persistent lipid signature with higher levels of triacylglycerols and diacyl-phospholipids as well as lowerlevels of alkylacyl phosphatidylcholines was observed in progressors to T2DM. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyl C18:2 (LysoPC(18:2)), phosphatidylcholines PC(32:1), PC(34:2e) and PC(36:1), and triacylglycerol TG(17:1/18:1/18:2) were selected to the full model that included metabolic risk factors and FINDRISC variables. When further adjusting for BM and age, these lipids had respective odds ratios of 0.32, 2.4, 0.50, 2.2 and 0.31 (all p <0.05) for progression to T2DM. The independently-validated predictive power improved in all pairwise comparisons between the lipid model and the respective standard risk model without the lipids (integrated discrimination improvement IDI > 0; p <0.05). Notably, the lipid models remained predictive of the development of T2DM in the fasting plasma glucose-matched subset of the validation study. Conclusion. This study indicates that a lipid signature characteristic of T2DM is present years before the diagnosis and improves prediction of progression to T2DM. Molecular lipid biomarkers were shown to have predictive power also in a high-risk group, where standard risk factors are not helpful at distinguishing progressors from non-progressors. (C) 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Rintamäki, Reeta; Rautio, Nina; Peltonen, Markku; Jokelainen, Jari; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Oksa, Heikki; Saaristo, Timo; Puolijoki, Hannu; Saltevo, Juha; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; Moilanen, Leena (2021)
    Aims: The Finnish National Diabetes Prevention Program (FIN-D2D) was the first large-scale diabetes prevention program in a primary health care setting in the world. The risk reduction of type 2 diabetes was 69% after one-year intervention in high-risk individuals who were able to lose 5% of their weight. We investigated long-term effects of one-year weight change on the incidence of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular events, and all-cause mortality. Methods: A total of 10,149 high-risk individuals for type 2 diabetes were identified in primary health care centers and they were offered lifestyle intervention to prevent diabetes. Of these individuals who participated in the baseline screening, 8353 had an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Complete followup data during one-year intervention were available for 2730 individuals and those were included in the follow-up analysis. The long-term outcome events were collected from national health registers after the median follow-up of 7.4 years. Results: Among individuals who lost weight 2.5 & minus;4.9% and 5% or more during the first year, the hazard ratio for the incidence of drug-treated diabetes was 0.63 (95% CI 0.49 & minus;0.81, p = 0.0001), and 0.71 (95% CI 0.56 & minus;0.90, p = 0.004), respectively, compared with those with stable weight. There were no significant differences in cardiovascular events or all-cause mortality among study participants according to oneyear weight changes. Conclusions: High-risk individuals for type 2 diabetes who achieved a moderate weight loss by one-year lifestyle counseling in primary health care had a long-term reduction in the incidence of drug-treated type 2 diabetes. The observed moderate weight loss was not associated with a reduction in cardiovascular events. (c) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Primary Care Diabetes Europe. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/bync-nd/4.0/).
  • Matinolli, Hanna-Maria; Hovi, Petteri; Levälahti, Esko; Kaseva, Nina; Silveira, Patricia P.; Hemiö, Katri; Järvenpää, Anna-Liisa; Eriksson, Johan G.; Andersson, Sture; Lindström, Jaana; Männistö, Satu; Kajantie, Eero (2017)
    Epidemiological studies and animal models suggest that early postnatal nutrition and growth can influence adult health. However, few human studies have objective recordings of early nutrient intake. We studied whether nutrient intake and growth during the first 9 weeks after preterm birth with very low birth weight (VLBW,
  • Cederberg, Henna; Gylling, Helena; Miettinen, Tatu A.; Paananen, Jussi; Vangipurapu, Jagadish; Pihlajamaki, Jussi; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Stancakova, Alena; Smith, Ulf; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku (2013)
  • Feel4Diabetes Res Grp; Kivelä, Jemina; Wikström, Katja; Virtanen, Eeva; Georgoulis, Michael; Lindström, Jaana (2020)
    Background Feel4Diabetes was a school and community based intervention aiming to promote healthy lifestyle and tackle obesity for the prevention of type 2 diabetes among families in 6 European countries. We conducted this literature review in order to guide the development of evidence-based implementation of the Feel4Diabetes intervention. We focused on type 2 diabetes prevention strategies, including all the phases from risk identification to implementation and maintenance. Special focus was given to prevention among vulnerable groups and people under 45 years. Methods Scientific and grey literature published between January 2000 and January 2015 was searched for relevant studies using electronic databases. To present the literature review findings in a systematic way, we used the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. A complementary literature search from February 2015 to December 2018 was also conducted. Results The initial review included 27 studies with a follow-up >= 12 months and 9 studies with a follow-up >= 6 months and with a participant mean age <45 years. We found out that interventions should be targeted at people at risk to improve recruiting and intervention effectiveness. Screening questionnaires (primarily Finnish Diabetes Risk Score FINDRISC) and blood glucose measurement can both be used for screening; the method does not appear to affect intervention effectiveness. Screening and recruitment is time-consuming, especially when targeting lower socioeconomic status and age under 45 years. The intervention intensity is more important for effectiveness than the mode of delivery. Moderate changes in several lifestyle habits lead to good intervention results. A minimum of 3-year follow-up seemed to be required to show a reduction in diabetes risk in high-risk individuals. In participants <45 years, the achieved results in outcomes were less pronounced. The complementary review included 12 studies, with similar results regarding intervention targets and delivery modes, as well as clinical significance. Conclusion This narrative review highlighted several important aspects that subsequently guided the development of the Feel4Diabetes high-risk intervention. Research on diabetes prevention interventions targeted at younger adults or vulnerable population groups is still relatively scarce. Feel4Diabetes is a good example of a project aiming to fill this research gap.