Browsing by Subject "INDEX"

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  • Poikane, Sandra; Birk, Sebastian; Boehmer, Juergen; Carvalho, Laurence; de Hoyos, Caridad; Gassner, Hubert; Hellsten, Seppo; Kelly, Martyn; Solheim, Anne Lyche; Olin, Mikko; Pall, Karin; Phillips, Geoff; Portielje, Rob; Ritterbusch, David; Sandin, Leonard; Schartau, Ann-Kristin; Solimini, Angelo G.; van den Berg, Marcel; Wolfram, Georg; van de Bund, Wouter (2015)
    The Water Framework Directive is the first international legislation to require European countries to establish comparable ecological assessment schemes for their freshwaters. A key element in harmonising quality classification within and between Europe's river basins is an "Intercalibration" exercise, stipulated by the WFD, to ensure that the good status boundaries in all of the biological assessment methods correspond to similar levels of anthropogenic pressure. In this article, we provide a comprehensive overview of this international comparison, focusing on the assessment schemes developed for freshwater lakes. Out of 82 lake ecological assessment methods reported for the comparison, 62 were successfully intercalibrated and included in the EC Decision on intercalibration, with a high proportion of phytoplankton (18), macrophyte (17) and benthic fauna (13) assessment methods. All the lake assessment methods are reviewed in this article, including the results of intercalibration. Furthermore, the current gaps and way forward to reach consistent management objectives for European lakes are discussed. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  • Jokelainen, Jarno; Mustonen, Harri; Kylänpää, Leena; Udd, Marianne; Lindström, Outi; Pöyhiä, Reino (2018)
    Background and aims: There is no consensus on how to assess the depth of sedation for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). This study was carried out in order to evaluate different methods of assessment of depth of sedation: bispectral index (BiS), modified Richmond Agitation/Sedation Scale (mRASS), modified Ramsay Sedation Scale (mRSS) and modified Observer Assessment of Alertness and Sedation (mOAAS) and their applicability to clinical practice.Methods: Two hundred patients were recruited. Sedation was given by standard clinical practice using propofol sedation or patient controlled sedation. Sedation was assessed on all patients using the above-mentioned methods. BiS was considered the reference point for sedation scales. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to determine the consistency of different scales in respect to each other and prediction probability and Spearman's correlation coefficients of sedation scales were calculated to show the relationship between sedation scales and BiS.Results: All scales showed high reliability with overall Cronbach's alpha 0.943. Dropping scales suggested better consistency between mOAAS, mRSS and mRASS than with BiS. Spearman's correlation and prediction probability showed similar results with all tested scales: mOAAS (0.695, 0.739), mRSS (0.673, 0.735), mRASS (0.683, 0.738), p
  • Männistö, Satu; Harald, Kennet; Härkänen, Tommi; Maukonen, Mirkka; Eriksson, Johan G.; Heikkinen, Sanna; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kaartinen, Niina E.; Kanerva, Noora; Knekt, Paul; Koskinen, Seppo; Laaksonen, Maarit A.; Malila, Nea; Rissanen, Harri; Pitkäniemi, Janne (2021)
    There is limited evidence for any dietary factor, except alcohol, in breast cancer (BC) risk. Therefore, studies on a whole diet, using diet quality indices, can broaden our insight. We examined associations of the Nordic Diet (mNDI), Mediterranean diet (mMEDI) and Alternative Healthy Eating Index (mAHEI) with postmenopausal BC risk. Five Finnish cohorts were combined including 6374 postmenopausal women with dietary information. In all, 8-9 dietary components were aggregated in each index, higher total score indicating higher adherence to a healthy diet. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the combined hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for BC risk. During an average 10-year follow-up period, 274 incident postmenopausal BC cases were diagnosed. In multivariable models, the HR for highest vs. lowest quintile of index was 0.67 (95 %CI 0.48-1.01) for mNDI, 0.88 (0.59-1.30) for mMEDI and 0.89 (0.60-1.32) for mAHEI. In this combined dataset, a borderline preventive finding of high adherence to mNDI on postmenopausal BC risk was found. Of the indices, mNDI was more based on the local food culture than the others. Although a healthy diet has beneficially been related to several chronic diseases, the link with the etiology of postmenopausal BC does not seem to be that obvious.
  • Henriksson, P; Sandborg, J; Soderstrom, E; Leppanen, MH; Snekkenes, V; Blomberg, M; Ortega, FB; Lof, M (2021)
  • Korhonen, Päivi E.; Mikkola, Tuija; Kautiainen, Hannu; Eriksson, Johan G. (2021)
    High body mass index (BMI) is known to be associated with elevated blood pressure (BP). The present study aims to determine the relative importance of the two components of BMI, fat mass and lean body mass index, on BP levels. We assessed body composition with bioimpedance and performed 24 hour ambulatory BP measurements in 534 individuals (mean age 61 +/- 3 years) who had no cardiovascular medication. Fat mass index and lean mass index were calculated analogously to BMI as fat mass or lean body mass (kg) divided by the square of height (m2). Both fat mass index and lean mass index showed a positive, small to moderate relationship with all 24 hour BP components independently of age, sex, smoking, and leisure-time physical activity. There were no interaction effects between fat mass index and lean mass index on the mean BP levels. Adult lean body mass is a significant determinant of BP levels with an equal, albeit small to moderate magnitude as fat mass. Relatively high amount of muscle mass may not be beneficial to cardiovascular health.
  • Bradbury, Kathryn E.; Appleby, Paul N.; Tipper, Sarah J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Allen, Naomi E.; Kvaskoff, Marina; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Halkjaer, Jytte; Cervenka, Iris; Mahamat-Saleh, Yahya; Bonnet, Fabrice; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renee T.; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Stratigos, Alexander J.; Palli, Domenico; Grioni, Sara; Matullo, Giuseppe; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Ghiasvand, Reza; Veierod, Marit B.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Bonet, Catalina; Molina, Elena; Huerta, Jose M.; Larranaga, Nerea; Barricarte, Aurelio; Merino, Susana; Isaksson, Karolin; Stocks, Tanja; Ljuslinder, Ingrid; Hemmingsson, Oskar; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc J.; Rinaldi, Sabina; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Aune, Dagfinn; Riboli, Elio; Key, Timothy J. (2019)
    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis, and is thought to play a role in tumour development. Previous prospective studies have shown that higher circulating concentrations of IGF-I are associated with a higher risk of cancers at specific sites, including breast and prostate. No prospective study has examined the association between circulating IGF-I concentrations and melanoma risk. A nested case-control study of 1,221 melanoma cases and 1,221 controls was performed in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, a prospective cohort of 520,000 participants recruited from 10 European countries. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for incident melanoma in relation to circulating IGF-I concentrations, measured by immunoassay. Analyses were conditioned on the matching factors and further adjusted for age at blood collection, education, height, BMI, smoking status, alcohol intake, marital status, physical activity and in women only, use of menopausal hormone therapy. There was no significant association between circulating IGF-I concentration and melanoma risk (OR for highest vs lowest fifth = 0.93 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.71 to 1.22]). There was no significant heterogeneity in the association between IGF-I concentrations and melanoma risk when subdivided by gender, age at blood collection, BMI, height, age at diagnosis, time between blood collection and diagnosis, or by anatomical site or histological subtype of the tumour (Pheterogeneity >= 0.078). We found no evidence for an association between circulating concentrations of IGF-I measured in adulthood and the risk of melanoma.
  • Vesterinen, Tiina; Mononen, Sanna; Salmenkivi, Kaisa; Mustonen, Harri; Ilonen, Ilkka; Knuuttila, Aija; Haglund, Caj; Arola, Johanna (2018)
    Background: Pulmonary carcinoids (PC) are rare malignant neoplasms that cover approximately 1% of all lung cancers. PCs are classified by histological criteria as either typical (TC) or atypical (AC). Histological subtype is the most studied prognostic factor. The aim of this study was to evaluate if other tissue or clinical features are associated with patient outcomes.Material and methods: We retrospectively reviewed clinical records of 133PC patients who underwent operation in the Helsinki University Hospital between 1990 and 2013. Tissue specimens were re-evaluated, processed into tissue microarray format and stained immunohistochemically with serotonin, calcitonin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) and Ki-67. Survival and risk analyses were performed.Results: Based on histology, 75% (n=100) of the tumors were TCs and 25% (n=33) ACs. TCs had higher 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rate than ACs (99% (95% CI, 93-100%) for TCs vs. 82% (95% CI, 61-92%) for ACs). Hormonally active tumors expressing serotonin, calcitonin or ACTH were noted in 53% of the specimens but hormonal expression was not associated with DSS. TTF-1 was positive in 78% of the specimens but was not associated with DSS. Ki-67 index varied between
  • Laakso, Sini M.; Myllynen, Chris; Strbian, Daniel; Atula, Sari (2021)
    Background: The effect of comorbidities on the prognosis of myasthenia gravis (MG) remains unclear. In particular, the role of other autoimmune diseases (AD) is controversial. Methods: In this retrospective single-center cohort study, we investigated 154 consecutive generalized thymectomized MG patients, with a mean follow-up time of 8.6 (+/- 5.0) years post-thymectomy. Comorbidities diagnosed at any timepoint were retrieved from medical records and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) scores were calculated. Patients were categorized into subgroups MG alone (n = 45) and MG with any comorbidity (n = 109); the latter was further categorized into MG with other ADs (n = 33) and MG with non-AD comorbidities (n = 76). The endpoints analyzed were complete stable remission (CSR), minimal need for medications, and need for inhospital treatments. Results: CSR was more frequent in MG alone than in MG with any comorbidity group (26.7% vs 8.3%, p = 0.004). Minimal need for medication was reached more often in the MG alone than in the MG with non-AD comorbidities group (p = 0.047). Need for in-hospital treatments was lower in the MG alone group than in MG patients with any comorbidity (p = 0.046). Logistic regression analysis revealed that lower CCI scores increased the likelihood of CSR (p = 0.033). Lower CCI scores were more prevalent both in patients with minimal need for medication and in patients who did not need in-hospital treatments (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Patients with generalized MG and comorbidities have a poorer prognosis than patients with MG alone during almost 9 years follow-up after thymectomy. AD comorbidities appeared not to translate into a higher risk compared to other comorbidities.
  • Ahvenainen, Patrik; Kontro, Inkeri; Svedström, Kirsi (2016)
    Cellulose crystallinity assessment is important for optimizing the yield of cellulose products, such as bioethanol. X-ray diffraction is often used for this purpose for its perceived robustness and availability. In this work, the five most common analysis methods (the Segal peak height method and those based on peak fitting and/or amorphous standards) are critically reviewed and compared to two-dimensional Rietveld refinement. A larger () and more varied collection of samples than previous studies have presented is used. In particular, samples () with low crystallinity and small crystallite sizes are included. A good linear correlation () between the five most common methods suggests that they agree on large-scale crystallinity differences between samples. For small crystallinity differences, however, correlation was not seen for samples that were from distinct sample sets. The least-squares fitting using an amorphous standard shows the smallest crystallite size dependence and this method combined with perpendicular transmission geometry also yielded values closest to independently obtained cellulose crystallinity values. On the other hand, these values are too low according to the Rietveld refinement. All analysis methods have weaknesses that should be considered when assessing differences in sample crystallinity.
  • Friedmacher, Florian; Pakarinen, Mikko P.; Rintala, Risto J. (2018)
    Despite a growing interest to clinicians and scientists, there is no comprehensive study that examines the global research activity on congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). A search strategy for the Web of Science (TM) database was designed to identify scientific CDH publications. Research output of countries, institutions, individual authors, and collaborative networks was analyzed. Semi-qualitative research measures including citation rate and h-index were assessed. Choropleth mapping and network diagrams were employed to visualize results. A total of 3669 publications were found, originating from 76 countries. The largest number was published by the USA (n = 1250), the UK (n = 279), and Canada (n = 215). The USA combined the highest number of cooperation articles (n = 152), followed by Belgium (n = 115) and the Netherlands (n = 93). The most productive collaborative networks were established between UK/Belgium (n = 53), Belgium/Spain (n = 47), and UK/Spain (n = 34). Canadian publications received the highest average citation rate (22.8), whereas the USA had the highest country-specific h-index (72). Eighty-five (2.3%) articles were published by international multicenter consortiums and national research networks. The most productive institutions and authors were based in North America and Europe. Over the past decades, CDH research has increasingly become multidisciplinary and numerous innovative therapeutic strategies were introduced. CDH-related research has constantly been progressing, involving today many disciplines with main research endeavors concentrating in a few high-income countries. Recent advances in prenatal interventions and regenerative medicine therapy hold the promise of improving CDH outcome in the 21st century. International collaborations and translational research should be strengthened to allow further evolution in this field.
  • Pirneskoski, Jussi; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Jeskanen, Petri; Linnamurto, Lari; Saikko, Simo; Nurmi, Jouni Onni Olavi (2013)
  • Uutela, Toini I.; Kautiainen, Hannu J.; Häkkinen, Arja H. (2018)
    Objectives Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation has a detrimental effect on muscle strength. Our objective was to analyse the association between muscle performance and different disease activity levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Method A total of 199 consecutive outpatients were subject to cross-sectional assessment. Measurements of grip strength, endurance of the upper and lower limbs and trunk strength were combined as a muscle performance composite score (MPCS), using a standardised method. The disease activity for 28 joints (DAS28), radiographs of small joints (Larsen score), rheumatoid factor, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities and anti-rheumatic drugs were verified. Patients questionnaires included sociodemographic information, pain level, global disease activity, the Beck Depression Inventory, the mental and physical component scores of Short Form-36 and physical activity level. Results Of the 199 patients, 36%, 17% and 47% patients had remission, low/moderate and high DAS28, respectively. The patients in remission had significantly shorter disease duration, better parameters in terms of pain, physicians assessment, Larsen, Beck or physical component score of Short Form-36, and they were more physically active than other patients. After adjustments for age, sex, RA duration, radiographs and BMI, the decreasing MPCS associated linearly with the increasing DAS28 activity levels (linearity, P Conclusion Poorer MPCS is clearly associated with higher disease activity in patients with RA. Muscle performance is a modifiable risk factor. The findings suggest evaluating muscle performance in clinical practice as a part of patient care.
  • CENTER-TBI High Resolution HR ICU; Zeiler, Frederick A.; Ercole, Ari; Cabeleira, Manuel; Raj, Rahul (2020)
    Background To date, the cerebral physiologic consequences of persistently elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) have been based on either low-resolution physiologic data or retrospective high-frequency data from single centers. The goal of this study was to provide a descriptive multi-center analysis of the cerebral physiologic consequences of ICP, comparing those with normal ICP to those with elevated ICP. Methods The Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) High-Resolution Intensive Care Unit (HR-ICU) sub-study cohort was utilized. The first 3 days of physiologic recording were analyzed, evaluating and comparing those patients with mean ICP <15 mmHg versus those with mean ICP > 20 mmHg. Various cerebral physiologic parameters were derived and evaluated, including ICP, brain tissue oxygen (PbtO(2)), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), pulse amplitude of ICP (AMP), cerebrovascular reactivity, and cerebral compensatory reserve. The percentage time and dose above/below thresholds were also assessed. Basic descriptive statistics were employed in comparing the two cohorts. Results 185 patients were included, with 157 displaying a mean ICP below 15 mmHg and 28 having a mean ICP above 20 mmHg. For admission demographics, only admission Marshall and Rotterdam CT scores were statistically different between groups (p = 0.017 andp = 0.030, respectively). The high ICP group displayed statistically worse CPP, PbtO(2), cerebrovascular reactivity, and compensatory reserve. The high ICP group displayed worse 6-month mortality (p <0.0001) and poor outcome (p = 0.014), based on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Score. Conclusions Low versus high ICP during the first 72 h after moderate/severe TBI is associated with significant disparities in CPP, AMP, cerebrovascular reactivity, cerebral compensatory reserve, and brain tissue oxygenation metrics. Such ICP extremes appear to be strongly related to 6-month patient outcomes, in keeping with previous literature. This work provides multi-center validation for previously described single-center retrospective results.
  • Lassas, Matti; Saksala, Teemu (2019)
    Let (N, g) be a Riemannian manifold with the distance function d(x, y) and an open subset M subset of N. For x is an element of M we denote by D-x the distance difference function D-x:F x F -> R, given by D-x(z(1), z(2)) = d(x, z(1)) - d(x, z(2)), z(1), z(2) is an element of F = N \ M. We consider the inverse problem of determining the topological and the differentiable structure of the manifold M and the metric g vertical bar M on it when we are given the distance difference data, that is, the set F, the metric g vertical bar F, and the collection D(M) = {D-x; x is an element of M}. Moreover, we consider the embedded image D(M) of the manifold M, in the vector space C(F x F), as a representation of manifold M. The inverse problem of determining (M, g) from D(M) arises e.g. in the study of the wave equation on R x N when we observe in F the waves produced by spontaneous point sources at unknown points (t, x) is an element of R x M. Then D-x (z(1), z(2)) is the difference of the times when one observes at points z(1) and z(2) the wave produced by a point source at x that goes off at an unknown time. The problem has applications in hybrid inverse problems and in geophysical imaging.
  • Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Kadesjo, Nils; Shi, Xie-Qi; Wolff, Jan (2015)
  • Juusola, L.; Andreeova, K.; Amm, O.; Kauristie, K.; Milan, S. E.; Palmroth, M.; Partamies, N. (2010)
  • Karppinen, Toni; Ylianttila, Lasse; Kautiainen, Hannu; Reunala, Timo; Snellman, Erna (2015)
    Empowering heliotherapy aims at clinical healing and improved coping with psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, but evidence of long-term effects is scarce. We studied the effect of 2-week empowering heliotherapy in the Canary Islands on clinical outcome and quality of life in 22 psoriasis and 13 atopic dermatitis patients. Empowerment consisted of meeting peers, sharing experiences and performing physical and mental practices. Using the self-administered PASI (SAPASI) psoriasis was alleviated statistically significantly during heliotherapy (p <0.001), and the treatment effect was still detectable 3 months later (p <0.001). Atopic dermatitis was improved (p <0.001) when assessed with the patient-oriented SCORAD (PO-SCORAD), and the effect was still obvious 3 months later (p = 0.002). During heliotherapy the dermatology life quality index (DLQI) improved in both groups (p <0.001), persisting in atopic patients for up to 3 months (p = 0.002), but not in psoriasis patients. In conclusion, a 2-week empowered heliotherapy showed a long-lasting improvement in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis disease activity, and also in the quality of life of atopic patients.
  • Karppinen, Toni; Laine, Juha-Pekka; Kautiainen, Hannu; Pasternack, Rafael; Reunala, Timo; Snellman, Erna (2017)
  • Riihimäki, Henri; Luoto, Miska; Heiskanen, Janne (2019)
    Fractional cover of green vegetation (FCover) is a key variable when observing Arctic vegetation under a changing climate. Vegetation changes over large areas are traditionally monitored by linking plot-scale measurements to satellite data. However, integrating field and satellite data is not straightforward. Typically, the satellite data are at a much coarser scale in comparison to field measurements. Here, we studied how Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) can be used to bridge this gap. We covered three 250 m x 250 m sites in Fennoscandian tundra with varying productivity ana FCover, ranging from barren vegetation to shrub tundra. The UAS sites were then used to train satellite data-based FCover models. First, we created a binary vegetation classification (absent, present) by using UAS-derived RGB-orthomosaics and logistic regression. Secondly, we used the classification to calculate FCover to Planet CubeSat (3 m), Sentinel-2A MSI (10 m, 20 m), and Landsat 8 OLI (30 m) grids, and examined how well FCover is explained by various spectral vegetation indices (VI) derived from satellite data. The overall classification accuracies for the UAS sites were >= 90%. The UAS-FCover were strongly related to the tested VIs (D-2 89% at best). The explained deviance was generally higher for coarser resolution data, indicating that the effect of data resolution should be taken into account when comparing results from different sensors. VIs based on red-edge (at 740 nm, 783 nm), or near-infrared and shortwave infrared (SWIR) had the highest performance. We recommend wider inspection of red-edge and SWIR bands for future Arctic vegetation research. Our results demonstrate that UASs can be used for observing FCover at multiple scales. Individual UAS sites can serve as focus areas, which provide information at the finest resolution (e.g. individual plants), whereas a sample of several UAS sites can be used to train satellite data and examine vegetation over larger extents.
  • O'Toole, J. M.; Boylan, G. B.; Vanhatalo, S.; Stevenson, N. J. (2016)
    Objective: To develop an automated estimate of EEG maturational age (EMA) for preterm neonates. Methods: The EMA estimator was based on the analysis of hourly epochs of EEG from 49 neonates with gestational age (GA) ranging from 23 to 32 weeks. Neonates had appropriate EEG for GA based on visual interpretation of the EEG. The EMA estimator used a linear combination (support vector regression) of a subset of 41 features based on amplitude, temporal and spatial characteristics of EEG segments. Estimator performance was measured with the mean square error (MSE), standard deviation of the estimate (SD) and the percentage error (SE) between the known GA and estimated EMA. Results: The EMA estimator provided an unbiased estimate of EMA with a MSE of 82 days (SD = 9.1 days; SE = 4.8%) which was significantly lower than a nominal reading (the mean GA in the dataset; MSE of 267 days, SD of 16.3 days, SE = 8.4%: p <0.001). The EMA estimator with the lowest MSE used amplitude, spatial and temporal EEG characteristics. Conclusions: The proposed automated EMA estimator provides an accurate estimate of EMA in early preterm neonates. Significance: Automated analysis of the EEG provides a widely accessible, noninvasive and continuous assessment of functional brain maturity. (C) 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.