Browsing by Subject "INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES"

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  • Räisänen, Ismo T.; Heikkinen, Anna Maria; Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Tervahartiala, Taina; Pajukanta, Riitta; Silbereisen, Angelika; Bostanci, Nagihan; Sorsa, Timo (2019)
    Background This cross-sectional study aims to investigate if a point-of-care (PoC) test of active matrix metalloproteinase-8 (aMMP-8) predicts levels of inflammation amplifier triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) and its putative ligand the neutrophil peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 (PGLYRP1) in saliva. Methods Forty-seven adolescents, aged 15 to 17 years, were tested with aMMP-8 PoC test, which was followed by a full-mouth clinical examination of the assessment of periodontal, mucosal, and oral health. TREM-1 and PGLYRP1 levels were analyzed by ELISA. The immunofluorometric assay (IFMA) specific for aMMP-8 was used as the reference method. Results Fourteen saliva samples out of a total of 47 showed positivity for aMMP-8 PoC test. Both the TREM-1 and the aMMP-8 (IFMA) levels were significantly elevated among the aMMP-8 PoC test positives compared with the PoC test negatives (P <0.05). Moreover, aMMP-8 levels assessed by IFMA showed a strong positive correlation with TREM-1 levels in saliva (r = 0.777, P <0.001). The number of sites with a probing depth of >= 4 mm was significantly lower among the adolescents that had a negative aMMP-8 PoC test result, and TREM-1 levels <75 pg/mL (P <0.05). In contrast, adolescents with a positive aMMP-8 PoC test result (i.e., elevated aMMP-8 levels) together with elevated TREM-1 levels had a significantly higher number of periodontal pockets with >= 4 mm (P <0.001). Conclusion The present study validated usability of aMMP-8 PoC test for predicting "proinflammatory" salivary profile and periodontal health status in adolescents.
  • Choo, Xin Yi; Liddell, Jeffrey R.; Huuskonen, Mikko T.; Grubman, Alexandra; Moujalled, Diane; Roberts, Jessica; Kysenius, Kai; Patten, Lauren; Quek, Hazel; Oikari, Lotta E.; Duncan, Clare; James, Simon A.; McInnes, Lachlan E.; Hayne, David J.; Donnelly, Paul S.; Pollari, Eveliina; Vähätalo, Suvi; Lejavova, Katarina; Kettunen, Mikko; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari; White, Anthony R.; Kanninen, Katja M. (2018)
    Background: Neuroinflammation and biometal dyshomeostasis are key pathological features of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Inflammation and biometals are linked at the molecular level through regulation of metal buffering proteins such as the metallothioneins. Even though the molecular connections between metals and inflammation have been demonstrated, little information exists on the effect of copper modulation on brain inflammation. Methods: We demonstrate the immunomodulatory potential of the copper bis(thiosemicarbazone) complex Cu-II(atsm) in an neuroinflammatory model in vivo and describe its anti-inflammatory effects on microglia and astrocytes in vitro. Results: By using a sophisticated in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach, we report the efficacy of Cu-II(atsm) in reducing acute cerebrovascular inflammation caused by peripheral administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cu-II(atsm) also induced anti-inflammatory outcomes in primary microglia [significant reductions in nitric oxide (NO), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)] and astrocytes [significantly reduced NO, MCP-1, and interleukin 6 (IL-6)] in vitro. These anti-inflammatory actions were associated with increased cellular copper levels and increased the neuroprotective protein metallothionein-1 (MT1) in microglia and astrocytes. Conclusion: The beneficial effects of Cu-II(atsm) on the neuroimmune system suggest copper complexes are potential therapeutics for the treatment of neuroinflammatory conditions.
  • Kibble, Milla; Khan, Suleiman A.; Saarinen, Niina; Iorio, Francesco; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Makela, Sari; Aittokallio, Tero (2016)
    Drug discovery is moving away from the single target-based approach towards harnessing the potential of polypharmacological agents that modulate the activity of multiple nodes in the complex networks of deregulations underlying disease phenotypes. Computational network pharmacology methods that use systems-level drug-response phenotypes, such as those originating from genome-wide transcriptomic profiles, have proved particularly effective for elucidating the mechanisms of action of multitargeted compounds. Here, we show, via the case study of the natural product pinosylvin, how the combination of two complementary network-based methods can provide novel, unexpected mechanistic insights. This case study also illustrates that elucidating the mechanism of action of multitargeted natural products through transcriptional response-based approaches is a challenging endeavor, often requiring multiple computational-experimental iterations.