Browsing by Subject "INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA"

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  • Ottman, Noora; Geerlings, Sharon Y.; Aalvink, Steven; de Vos, Willem M.; Belzer, Clara (2017)
    The discovery of Akkermansia muciniphila has opened new avenues for the use of this abundant intestinal symbiont in next generation therapeutic products, as well as targeting microbiota dynamics. A. muciniphila is known to colonize the mucosal layer of the human intestine where it triggers both host metabolic and immune responses. A. muciniphila is particularly effective in increasing mucus thickness and increasing gut barrier function. As a result host metabolic markers ameliorate. The mechanism of host regulation is thought to involve the outer membrane composition, including the type IV pili of A. muciniphila, that directly signal to host immune receptors. At the same time the metabolic activity of A. muciniphila leads to the production of short chain fatty acids that are beneficial to the host and microbiota members. This contributes to host-microbiota and microbe-microbe syntrophy The mucolytic activity and metabolite production make A. muciniphila a key species in the mucus layer, stimulating beneficial mucosal microbial networks. This well studied member of the microbiota has been studied in three aspects that will be further described in this review: i) A. muciniphila characteristics and mucin adaptation, ii) its role as key species in the mucosal microbiome, and iii) its role in host health. (C) 2017 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  • Derrien, Muriel; Belzer, Clara; de Vos, Willem M. (2017)
    Akkermansia muciniphila is an intestinal bacterium that was isolated a decade ago from a human fecal sample. Its specialization in mucin degradation makes it a key organism at the mucosal interface between the lumen and host cells. Although it was isolated quite recently, it has rapidly raised significant interest as A. muciniphila is the only cultivated intestinal representative of the Verrucomicrobia, one of the few phyla in the human gut that can be easily detected in phylogenetic and metagenome analyses. There has also been a growing interest in A. muciniphila, due to its association with health in animals and humans. Notably, reduced levels of A. muciniphila have been observed in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (mainly ulcerative colitis) and metabolic disorders, which suggests it may have potential anti-inflammatory properties. The aims of this review are to summarize the existing data on the intestinal distribution of A. muciniphila in health and disease, to provide insight into its ecology and its role in founding microbial networks at the mucosal interface, as well as to discuss recent research on its role in regulating host functions that are disturbed in various diseases, with a specific focus on metabolic disorders in both animals and humans. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Hänninen, Arno; Toivonen, Raine; Pöysti, Sakari; Belzer, Clara; Plovier, Hubert; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P.; Emani, Rohini; Cani, Patrice D.; De Vos, Willem M. (2018)
    Objective Intestinal microbiota is implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune type 1 diabetes in humans and in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, but evidence on its causality and on the role of individual microbiota members is limited. We investigated if different diabetes incidence in two NOD colonies was due to microbiota differences and aimed to identify individual microbiota members with potential significance. Design We profiled intestinal microbiota between two NOD mouse colonies showing high or low diabetes incidence by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and colonised the high-incidence colony with the microbiota of the low-incidence colony. Based on unaltered incidence, we identified a few taxa which were not effectively transferred and thereafter, transferred experimentally one of these to test its potential significance. Results Although the high-incidence colony adopted most microbial taxa present in the low-incidence colony, diabetes incidence remained unaltered. Among the few taxa which were not transferred, Akkermansia muciniphila was identified. As A. muciniphila abundancy is inversely correlated to the risk of developing type 1 diabetes-related autoantibodies, we transferred A. muciniphila experimentally to the high-incidence colony. A. muciniphila transfer promoted mucus production and increased expression of antimicrobial peptide Reg3., outcompeted Ruminococcus torques from the microbiota, lowered serum endotoxin levels and islet toll-like receptor expression, promoted regulatory immunity and delayed diabetes development. Conclusion Transfer of the whole microbiota may not reduce diabetes incidence despite a major change in gut microbiota, but single symbionts such as A. muciniphila with beneficial metabolic and immune signalling effects may reduce diabetes incidence when administered as a probiotic.
  • Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Elzinga, Janneke; Ottman, Noora; Klievink, Jay T.; Blijenberg, Bernadet; Aalvink, Steven; Boeren, Sjef; Mank, Marko; Knol, Jan; de Vos, Willem M.; Belzer, Clara (2020)
    Akkermansia muciniphila is a well-studied anaerobic bacterium specialized in mucus degradation and associated with human health. Because of the structural resemblance of mucus glycans and free human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs), we studied the ability of A. muciniphila to utilize human milk oligosaccharides. We found that A. muciniphila was able to grow on human milk and degrade HMOs. Analyses of the proteome of A. muciniphila indicated that key-glycan degrading enzymes were expressed when the bacterium was grown on human milk. Our results display the functionality of the key-glycan degrading enzymes (alpha -l-fucosidases, beta -galactosidases, exo-alpha -sialidases and beta -acetylhexosaminidases) to degrade the HMO-structures 2 ' -FL, LNT, lactose, and LNT2. The hydrolysation of the host-derived glycan structures allows A. muciniphila to promote syntrophy with other beneficial bacteria, contributing in that way to a microbial ecological network in the gut. Thus, the capacity of A. muciniphila to utilize human milk will enable its survival in the early life intestine and colonization of the mucosal layer in early life, warranting later life mucosal and metabolic health.
  • Holster, Savanne; Hooiveld, Guido J.; Repsilber, Dirk; de Vos, Willem M.; Brummer, Robert J.; König, Julia (2019)
    Faecal microbiota transfer (FMT) consists of the introduction of new microbial communities into the intestine of a patient, with the aim of restoring a disturbed gut microbiota. Even though it is used as a potential treatment for various diseases, it is unknown how the host mucosa responds to FMT. This study aims to investigate the colonic mucosa gene expression response to allogenic (from a donor) or autologous (own) FMT in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In a recently conducted randomised, double-blinded, controlled clinical study, 17 IBS patients were treated with FMT by colonoscopy. RNA was isolated from colonic biopsies collected by sigmoidoscopy at baseline, as well as two weeks and eight weeks after FMT. In patients treated with allogenic FMT, predominantly immune response-related gene sets were induced, with the strongest response two weeks after the FMT. In patients treated with autologous FMT, predominantly metabolism-related gene sets were affected. Furthermore, several microbiota genera showed correlations with immune-related gene sets, with different correlations found after allogenic compared to autologous FMT. This study shows that the microbe-host response is influenced by FMT on the mucosal gene expression level, and that there are clear differences in response to allogenic compared to autologous FMT.
  • Schwarz, Emanuel; Maukonen, Johanna; Hyytiäinen, Tiina; Kieseppä, Tuula; Oresic, Matej; Sabunciyan, Sarven; Mantere, Outi; Saarela, Maria; Yolken, Robert; Suvisaari, Jaana (2018)
    The effects of gut microbiota on the central nervous system, along its possible role in mental disorders, have received increasing attention. Here we investigated differences in fecal microbiota between 28 patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and 16 healthy matched controls and explored whether such differences were associated with response after up to 12 months of treatment. Numbers of Lactobacillus group bacteria were elevated in FEP-patients and significantly correlated with severity along different symptom domains. A subgroup of FEP patients with the strongest microbiota differences also showed poorer response after up to 12 months of treatment. The present findings support the involvement of microbiota alterations in psychotic illness and may provide the basis for exploring the benefit of their modulation on treatment response and remission. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Lankelma, Jacqueline M.; Belzer, Clara; Hoogendijk, Arie J.; de Vos, Alex F.; de Vos, Willem M.; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, W. Joost (2016)
    OBJECTIVES: Broad-spectrum antibiotics disrupt the intestinal microbiota. The microbiota is essential for physiological processes, such as the development of the gut immune system. Recent murine data suggest that the intestinal microbiota also modulates systemic innate immune responses; however, evidence in humans is lacking. METHODS: Twelve healthy young men were given oral broad-spectrum antibiotics (ciprofloxacin 500 mg bid, vancomycin 500 mg tid and metronidazole 500 mg tid) for 7 days. At baseline, 1 day, and 6 weeks after antibiotics, blood and feces were sampled. Whole blood and isolated mononuclear cells were stimulated with selected Toll-like receptor agonists and heat-killed bacteria. Microbiota diversity and composition was determined using bacterial 16S rDNA sequencing. RESULTS: One day after the antibiotic course, microbial diversity was significantly lower compared with baseline. After antibiotic therapy, systemic mononuclear cells produced lower levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha after ex vivo stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This diminished capacity to produce TNF-alpha was restored 6 weeks after cessation of antibiotic therapy. In whole blood, a reduced capacity to release interleukin (IL)-1 beta and IL-6 was observed after LPS stimulation. Antibiotic treatment did not impact on differential leukocyte counts, phagocytosis, and cell surface markers of neutrophils and monocytes. CONCLUSIONS: In this proof-of-principle study of healthy subjects, microbiota disruption by broad-spectrum antibiotics is reversibly associated with decreased systemic cellular responsiveness towards LPS. The implications of these findings in a clinical setting remain to be determined.
  • Korpela, Katri; Salonen, Anne; Saxen, Harri; Nikkonen, Anne; Peltola, Ville; Jaakkola, Tytti; de Vos, Willem; Kolho, Kaija-Leena (2020)
    BACKGROUND The effects of antibiotics on infant gut microbiota are unclear. We hypothesized that the use of common antibiotics results in long-term aberration in gut microbiota. METHODS Antibiotic-naive infants were prospectively recruited when hospitalized because of a respiratory syncytial virus infection. Composition of fecal microbiota was compared between those receiving antibiotics during follow-up (prescribed at clinicians' discretion because of complications such as otitis media) and those with no antibiotic exposure. Fecal sampling started on day 1, then continued at 2-day intervals during the hospital stay, and at 1, 3 and 6 months at home. RESULTS One hundred and sixty-three fecal samples from 40 patients (median age 2.3 months at baseline; 22 exposed to antibiotics) were available for microbiota analyses. A single course of amoxicillin or macrolide resulted in aberration of infant microbiota characterized by variation in the abundance of bifidobacteria, enterobacteria and clostridia, lasting for several months. Recovery from the antibiotics was associated with an increase in clostridia. Occasionally, antibiotic use resulted in microbiota profiles associated with inflammatory conditions. CONCLUSIONS Antibiotic use in infants modifies especially bifidobacterial levels. Further studies are warranted whether administration of bifidobacteria will provide health benefits by normalizing the microbiota in infants receiving antibiotics.
  • PASTURE EFRAIM Study Grp; Metzler, Stefanie; Frei, Remo; Schmausser-Hechfellner, Elisabeth; Pekkanen, Juha; Karvonen, Anne M.; Kirjavainen, Pirkka V.; Roduit, Caroline (2019)
    Background: Allergies are a serious public health issue, and prevalences are rising worldwide. The role of antibiotics in the development of allergies has repeatedly been discussed, as results remain inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between pre-and post-natal antibiotic exposure and subsequent development of allergies (atopic dermatitis, food allergy, asthma, atopic sensitization and allergic rhinitis). Methods: A total of 1080 children who participated in a European birth cohort study (PASTURE) were included in this analysis. Data on antibiotic exposure during pregnancy and/or first year of life and allergic diseases were collected by questionnaires from pregnancy up to 6 years of age and analysed by performing logistic regressions. To take into account reverse causation, we included models, where children with diagnosis or symptoms of the respective disease in the first year of life were excluded. Results: Antibiotic exposure in utero was significantly and positively associated with atopic dermatitis and food allergy. The strongest effect was on diseases with onset within the first year of life (for atopic dermatitis: aOR 1.66, 95% CI 1.11-2.48 and for food allergy: aOR 3.01, 95% CI 1.22-7.47). Antibiotics in the first year of life were positively associated with atopic dermatitis up to 4 years (aOR 2.73, 95% CI 1.66-4.49) and also suggested a dose-response relationship. A tendency was observed with asthma between 3 and 6 years (aOR 1.65, 95% CI 0.95-2.86). Conclusions: Our findings show positive associations between exposure to antibiotics and allergies, mainly atopic dermatitis and food allergy within the first year of life, after prenatal exposure, and atopic dermatitis and asthma after post-natal exposure to antibiotics in children born in rural settings.
  • Malinen, Erja; Krogius-Kurikka, Lotta Kaisa; Lyra, Anna; Nikkila, Janne; Jaaskelainen, Anne; Rinttila, Teemu; Vilpponen-Salmela, Terttu; von Wright, Atte Johannes; Palva, Airi (2010)
  • Giaretta, Paula R.; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Jergens, Albert E.; Steiner, Jorg M.; Lidbury, Jonathan A.; Cook, Audrey K.; Hanifeh, Mohsen; Spillmann, Thomas; Kilpinen, Susanne; Syrja, Pernilla; Rech, Raquel R. (2020)
    The intestinal microbiota is believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease in humans and chronic inflammatory enteropathy (CIE) in dogs. While most previous studies have described the gut microbiota using sequencing methods, it is fundamental to assess the spatial distribution of the bacteria for a better understanding of their relationship with the host. The microbiota in the colonic mucosa of 22 dogs with CIE and 11 control dogs was investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a universal eubacterial probe (EUB338) and specific probes for select bacterial groups. The number of total bacteria labeled with EUB338 probe was lower within the colonic crypts of dogs with CIE compared to controls. Helicobacter spp. and Akkermansia spp. were decreased on the colonic surface and in the crypts of dogs with CIE. Dogs with CIE had increased number of Escherichia coli/Shigella spp. on the colonic surface and within the crypts compared to control dogs. In conclusion, the bacterial microbiota in the colonic mucosa differed between dogs with and without CIE, with depletion of the crypt bacteria in dogs with CIE. The crypt bacterial species that was intimately associated with the host mucosa in control dogs was composed mainly of Helicobacter spp.
  • Moles, Laura; Gomez, Marta; Heilig, Hans; Bustos, Gerardo; Fuentes, Susana; de Vos, Willem; Fernandez, Leonides; Rodriguez, Juan M.; Jimenez, Esther (2013)
  • Gomez, Marta; Moles, Laura; Espinosa-Martos, Irene; Bustos, Gerardo; de Vos, Willem M.; Fernandez, Leonides; Rodriguez, Juan M.; Fuentes, Susana; Jimenez, Esther (2017)
    An abnormal colonization pattern of the preterm gut may affect immune maturation and exert a long-term influence on the intestinal bacterial composition and host health. However, follow-up studies assessing the evolution of the fecal microbiota of infants that were born preterm are very scarce. In this work, the bacterial compositions of fecal samples, obtained from sixteen 2-year-old infants were evaluated using a phylogenetic microarray; subsequently, the results were compared with those obtained in a previous study from samples of meconium and feces collected from the same infants while they stayed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In parallel, the concentration of a wide range of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and immunoglobulins were determined in meconium and fecal samples. Globally, a higher bacterial diversity and a lower interindividual variability were observed in 2-year-olds' feces, when compared to the samples obtained during their first days of life. Hospital-associated fecal bacteria, that were dominant during the NICU stay, seemed to be replaced, two years later, by genera, which are usually predominant in the healthy adult microbiome. The immune profile of the meconium and fecal samples differed, depending on the sampling time, showing different immune maturation statuses of the gut.
  • Pereira, Pedro; Aho, Velma; Arola, Johanna; Boyd, Sonja; Jokelainen, Kalle; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Farkkila, Martti (2017)
    Objective The etiopathogenesis and risk for development of biliary neoplasia in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are largely unknown. Microbes or their metabolites have been suggested to play a role. To explore this potential microbial involvement, we evaluated the differences in biliary microbiota in PSC patients at an early disease stage without previous endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) examinations, advanced disease stage, and with biliary dysplasia or cholangiocarcinoma. Design Bile samples from the common bile duct were collected from 46 controls and 80 patients with PSC during ERC (37 with early disease, 32 with advanced disease, and 11 with biliary dysplasia). DNA isolation, amplification, and Illumina MiSeq sequencing were performed for the V1-V3 regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Results The most common phyla found were Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Fusobacteria, and Actinobacteria. The most common families were Prevotellaceae, Streptococcaceae, Veillonellaceae, Fusobacteriaceae, and Pasteurellaceae, and the most common genera were Prevotella, Streptococcus, Veillonella, Fusobacterium, and Haemophilus. The bacterial communities of non-PSC subjects and early stage PSC patients were similar. Alpha diversity was lower in patients with biliary dysplasia/cholangiocarcinoma than in other groups. An increase in Streptococcus abundance was positively correlated with the number of ERC examinations. Streptococcus abundance was also positively correlated with an increase in disease severity, even after controlling for the number of ERC examinations. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the aetiology of PSC is not associated with changes in bile microbial communities, but the genus Streptococcus may play a pathogenic role in the progression of the disease.
  • Eshriqui, Ilana; Viljakainen, Heli T.; Ferreira, Sandra; Raju, Sajan C.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Figueiredo, Rejane A. O. (2020)
    Background Breastfeeding contributes to gastrointestinal microbiota colonization in early life, but its long-term impact is inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate whether the type of feeding during the first six months of life was associated with oral microbiota in adolescence. Methods This is a cross-sectional sub-study using baseline information of 423 adolescents from the Finnish Health in Teens (Fin-HIT) cohort. Type of feeding was recalled by parents and dichotomized as (i) No infant formula; (ii) Infant formula (breastmilk + formula or only formula). Saliva microbiota was analysed using 16S rRNA (V3-V4) sequencing. Alpha diversity and beta diversity were compared between feeding type groups using ANCOVA and PERMANOVA, respectively. Differential bacteria abundance was tested using appropriate general linear models. Results Mean age and body mass index were 11.7 years and 18.0 kg/m(2), respectively. The No formula group contained 41% of the participants. Firmicutes (51.0%), Bacteroidetes (19.1%), and Proteobacteria (16.3%) were the most abundant phyla among all participants. Alpha and beta diversity indices did not differ between the two feeding groups. Three Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) belonging to Eubacteria and Veillonella genera (phylum Firmicutes) were more abundant in the No formula than in the Infant formula group (log2fold changes/ p - values - 0.920/ <0.001, - 0.328/ 0.001, - 0.577/ 0.004). Conclusion Differences exist in abundances of some OTUs in adolescence according to feeding type during the first six months of life, but our findings do not support diversity and overall oral microbiota composition in adolescents being affected by early feeding type.
  • Biesiekierski, Jessica R.; Jalanka, Jonna; Staudacher, Heidi M. (2019)
    Dietary intervention is a challenge in clinical practice because of inter-individual variability in clinical response. Gut microbiota is mechanistically relevant for a number of disease states and consequently has been incorporated as a key variable in personalised nutrition models within the research context. This paper aims to review the evidence related to the predictive capacity of baseline microbiota for clinical response to dietary intervention in two specific health conditions, namely, obesity and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Clinical trials and larger predictive modelling studies were identified and critically evaluated. The findings reveal inconsistent evidence to support baseline microbiota as an accurate predictor of weight loss or glycaemic response in obesity, or as a predictor of symptom improvement in irritable bowel syndrome, in dietary intervention trials. Despite advancement in quantification methodologies, research in this area remains challenging and larger scale studies are needed until personalised nutrition is realistically achievable and can be translated to clinical practice.
  • Korpela, K.; Zijlmans, M. A. C.; Kuitunen, M.; Kukkonen, K.; Savilahti, E.; Salonen, Anne; de Weerth, C.; de Vos, W. M. (2017)
    Background: Children with high body mass index (BMI) at preschool age are at risk of developing obesity. Early identification of factors that increase the risk of excessive weight gain could help direct preventive actions. The intestinal microbiota and antibiotic use have been identified as potential modulators of early metabolic programming and weight development. To test if the early microbiota composition is associated with later BMI, and if antibiotic use modifies this association, we analysed the faecal microbiota composition at 3 months and the BMI at 5-6 years in two cohorts of healthy children born vaginally at term in the Netherlands (N = 87) and Finland (N = 75). We obtained lifetime antibiotic use records and measured weight and height of all children. Results: The relative abundance of streptococci was positively and the relative abundance of bifidobacteria negatively associated with the BMI outcome. The association was especially strong among children with a history of antibiotic use. Bacteroides relative abundance was associated with BMI only in the children with minimal lifetime antibiotic exposure. Conclusions: The intestinal microbiota of infants are predictive of later BMI and may serve as an early indicator of obesity risk. Bifidobacteria and streptococci, which are indicators of microbiota maturation in infants, are likely candidates for metabolic programming of infants, and their influence on BMI appears to depend on later a\ntibiotic use.
  • Holster, S.; Repsilber, D.; Geng, D.; Hyotylainen, T.; Salonen, A.; Lindqvist, C. M.; Rajan, S. K.; de Vos, W. M.; Brummer, R. J.; König, J. (2021)
    Faecal microbiota transfer (FMT) consists of the infusion of donor faecal material into the intestine of a patient with the aim to restore a disturbed gut microbiota. In this study, it was investigated whether FMT has an effect on faecal microbial composition, its functional capacity, faecal metabolite profiles and their interactions in 16 irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Faecal samples from eight different time points before and until six months after allogenic FMT (faecal material from a healthy donor) as well as autologous FMT (own faecal material) were analysed by 16S RNA gene amplicon sequencing and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GS-MS). The results showed that the allogenic FMT resulted in alterations in the microbial composition that were detectable up to six months, whereas after autologous FMT this was not the case. Similar results were found for the functional profiles, which were predicted from the phylogenetic sequencing data. While both allogenic FMT as well as autologous FMT did not have an effect on the faecal metabolites measured in this study, correlations between the microbial composition and the metabolites showed that the microbe-metabolite interactions seemed to be disrupted after allogenic FMT compared to autologous FMT. This shows that FMT can lead to altered interactions between the gut microbiota and its metabolites in IBS patients. Further research should investigate if and how this affects efficacy of FMT treatments.
  • Garn, Holger; Bahn, Sabine; Baune, Bernhard T.; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Bisgaard, Hans; Chatila, Talal A.; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Culmsee, Carsten; Dannlowski, Udo; Gay, Steffen; Gern, James; Haahtela, Tari; Kircher, Tilo; Mueller-Ladner, Ulf; Neurath, Markus F.; Preissner, Klaus T.; Reinhardt, Christoph; Rook, Graham; Russell, Shannon; Schmeck, Bernd; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Steinhoff, Ulrich; van Os, Jim; Weiss, Scott; Zemlin, Michael; Renz, Harald (2016)
    Recent research indicates that chronic inflammatory diseases, including allergies and autoimmune and neuropsychiatric diseases, share common pathways of cellular and molecular dysregulation. It was the aim of the International von-Behring-Rontgen Symposium (October 16-18, 2014, in Marburg, Germany) to discuss recent developments in this field. These include a concept of biodiversity; the contribution of urbanization, lifestyle factors, and nutrition (eg, vitamin D); and new mechanisms of metabolic and immune dysregulation, such as extracellular and intracellular RNAs and cellular and mitochondrial stress. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute further to altered gene expression and therefore to the development of chronic inflammation. These novel findings provide the foundation for further development of preventive and therapeutic strategies.
  • Chia, Loo Wee; Hornung, Bastian V. H.; Aalvink, Steven; Schaap, Peter J.; de Vos, Willem M.; Knol, Jan; Belzer, Clara (2018)
    Host glycans are paramount in regulating the symbiotic relationship between humans and their gut bacteria. The constant flux of host-secreted mucin at the mucosal layer creates a steady niche for bacterial colonization. Mucin degradation by keystone species subsequently shapes the microbial community. This study investigated the transcriptional response during mucin-driven trophic interaction between the specialised mucin-degrader Akkermansia muciniphila and a butyrogenic gut commensal Anaerostipes caccae. A. muciniphila monocultures and co-cultures with non-mucolytic A. caccae from the Lachnospiraceae family were grown anaerobically in minimal media supplemented with mucin. We analysed for growth, metabolites (HPLC analysis), microbial composition (quantitative reverse transcription PCR), and transcriptional response (RNA-seq). Mucin degradation by A. muciniphila supported the growth of A. caccae and concomitant butyrate production predominantly via the acetyl-CoA pathway. Differential expression analysis (DESeq 2) showed the presence of A. caccae induced changes in the A. muciniphila transcriptional response with increased expression of mucin degradation genes and reduced expression of ribosomal genes. Two putative operons that encode for uncharacterised proteins and an efflux system, and several two-component systems were also differentially regulated. This indicated A. muciniphila changed its transcriptional regulation in response to A. caccae. This study provides insight to understand the mucin-driven microbial ecology using metatranscriptomics. Our findings show that the expression of mucolytic enzymes by A. muciniphila increases upon the presence of a community member. This could indicate its role as a keystone species that supports the microbial community in the mucosal environment by increasing the availability of mucin sugars.