Browsing by Subject "INVENTORY"

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  • Eriksson, Mia D.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Kautiainen, Hannu; Salonen, Minna K.; Mikkola, Tuija M.; Kajantie, Eero; Wasenius, Niko; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela; Laine, Merja K. (2021)
    Background: Millions of people live with depression and its burden of disease. Depression has an increased comorbidity and mortality that has remained unexplained. Studies have reported connections between advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and various disease processes, including mental health. The present study evaluated associations between AGEs, depressive symptoms, and types of depressive symptoms. Methods: From the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, 815 participants with a mean age of 76 years were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Characteristics regarding self-reported lifestyle and medical history, as well as blood tests were obtained along with responses regarding depressive symptoms according to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Mental Health Inventory-5. Each participant had their AGE level measured non-invasively with skin autofluorescence (SAF). Statistical analyses looked at relationships between types of depressive symptoms and AGE levels by sex. Results: Of women, 27% scored >= 10 on the BDI and 18% of men, respectively. Men had higher crude AGE levels (mean [standard deviation], arbitrary units) (2.49 [0.51]) compared to women (2.33 [0.46]) (p < 0.001). The highest crude AGE levels were found in those with melancholic depressive symptoms (2.61 [0.57]), followed by those with non-melancholic depressive symptoms (2.45 [0.45]) and those with no depressive symptoms (2.38 [0.49]) (p = 0.013). These findings remained significant in the fully adjusted model. Conclusions: The current study shows an association between depressive symptoms and higher AGE levels. The association is likely part of a multi-factorial effect, and hence no directionality, causality, or effect can be inferred solely based on the results of this study.
  • Luoma, Ville; Saarinen, Ninni; Wulder, Michael A.; White, Joanne C.; Vastaranta, Mikko; Holopainen, Markus; Hyyppä, Juha (2017)
    Forest resource information has a hierarchical structure: individual tree attributes are summed at the plot level and then in turn, plot-level estimates are used to derive stand or large-area estimates of forest resources. Due to this hierarchy, it is imperative that individual tree attributes are measured with accuracy and precision. With the widespread use of different measurement tools, it is also important to understand the expected degree of precision associated with these measurements. The most prevalent tree attributes measured in the field are tree species, stem diameter-at-breast-height (dbh), and tree height. For dbh and height, the most commonly used measuring devices are calipers and clinometers, respectively. The aim of our study was to characterize the precision of individual tree dbh and height measurements in boreal forest conditions when using calipers and clinometers. The data consisted of 319 sample trees at a study area in Evo, southern Finland. The sample trees were measured independently by four trained mensurationists. The standard deviation in tree dbh and height measurements was 0.3 cm (1.5%) and 0.5 m (2.9%), respectively. Precision was also assessed by tree species and tree size classes; however, there were no statistically significant differences between the mensurationists for dbh or height measurements. Our study offers insights into the expected precision of tree dbh and height as measured with the most commonly used devices. These results are important when using sample plot data in forest inventory applications, especially now, at a time when new tree attribute measurement techniques based on remote sensing are being developed and compared to the conventional caliper and clinometer measurements.
  • Saarinen, Ninni; Kankare, Ville; Pyorala, Jiri; Yrttimaa, Tuomas; Liang, Xinlian; Wulder, Michael A.; Holopainen, Markus; Hyyppa, Juha; Vastaranta, Mikko (2019)
    Large and comprehensive datasets, traditionally based on destructive stem analysis or other labor-intensive approaches, are commonly considered as a necessity in developing stem-volume equations. The aim here was to investigate how a decreasing number of sample trees affects parametrizing an existing taper curve equation and resultant stem-volume estimates. Furthermore, the potential of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in producing taper curves was examined. A TLS-based taper curve was derived for 246 Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) from southern Finland to parametrize an existing taper curve equation. To assess sensitivity of the parametrization regarding sample size, the number of Scots pines included in the parametrization varied between full census and 1 Scots pine at a time. Root mean square error of stem-volume estimates remained = 46 Scots pines. Thus, it can be concluded that, with a rather small sample size, a taper curve equation can be re-parametrized for local conditions using point clouds from TLS to produce consistent stem-volume estimates.
  • Saarinen, Ninni; Kankare, Ville; Yrttimaa, Tuomas; Viljanen, Niko; Honkavaara, Eija; Holopainen, Markus; Hyyppä, Juha; Huuskonen, Saija; Hynynen, Jari; Vastaranta, Mikko (2020)
    Forest management alters the growing conditions and thus further development of trees. However, quantitative assessment of forest management on tree growth has been demanding as methodologies for capturing changes comprehensively in space and time have been lacking. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has shown to be capable of providing three-dimensional (3D) tree stem reconstructions required for revealing differences between stem shapes and sizes. In this study, we used 3D reconstructions of tree stems from TLS and an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to investigate how varying thinning treatments and the following growth effects affected stem shape and size of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees. The results showed that intensive thinning resulted in more stem volume and therefore total biomass allocation and carbon uptake compared to the moderate thinning.Relationship between tree height and diameter at breast height (i.e. slenderness) varied between both thinning intensity and type (i.e. from below and above) indicating differing response to thinning and allocation of stem growth of Scots pine trees. Furthermore, intensive thinning, especially from below, produced less variation in relative stem attributes characterizing stem shape and size. Thus, it can be concluded that thinning intensity,type, and the following growth effects have an impact on post-thinning stem shape and size of Scots pine trees.Our study presented detailed measurements on post-thinning stem growth of Scots pines that have been laborious or impracticable before the emergence of detailed 3D technologies. Moreover, the stem reconstructions from TLS and UAV provided variety of attributes characterizing stem shape and size that have not traditionally been feasible to obtain. The study demonstrated that detailed 3D technologies, such as TLS and UAV, provide information that can be used to generate new knowledge for supporting forest management and silviculture as well as improving ecological understanding of boreal forests.1
  • Yu, Xiaowei; Litkey, Paula; Hyyppa, Juha; Holopainen, Markus; Vastaranta, Mikko (2014)
  • Seppala, Jussi; Koponen, Hannu; Kautiainen, Hannu; Eriksson, Johan G.; Kampman, Olli; Leiviska, Jaana; Mannisto, Satu; Mantyselka, Pekka; Oksa, Heikki; Ovaskainen, Yrj; Viikki, Merja; Vanhala, Mauno; Seppala, Jussi (2013)
  • Lietzen, Raija; Virtanen, Pekka; Kivimaki, Mika; Korkeila, Jyrki; Suominen, Sakari; Sillanmaki, Lauri; Koskenvuo, Markku; Vahtera, Jussi (2017)
    Objective: This prospective, population-based cohort study of 1102 Finnish adults with asthma, examined whether exposure to stressful life events is associated with the intensity of usage of inhaled short-acting beta(2)-agonists. Methods: Survey data was collected by two postal questionnaires. Baseline characteristics were obtained in 1998 and data on 19 specific stressful events (e.g. death of a child or spouse or divorce) within the six preceding months in 2003. Exposure to life events was indicated by a sum score weighted by mean severity of the events. Participants were linked to records of filled prescriptions for inhaled short-acting beta(2)-agonists from national registers from 2000 through 2006. The rates of purchases of short-acting beta(2)-agonists before (2000 2001), during (2002 2003) and after (2004-2006) the event exposure were estimated using repeated-measures Poisson regression analyses with the generalized estimating equation. Results: Of the 1102 participants, 162 (15%) were exposed to highly stressful events, 205 (19%) to less stressful events. During the 7-year observation period, 5955 purchases of filled prescription for inhaled short-acting beta(2)-agonists were recorded. After exposure to highly stressful events, the rate of purchases of beta(2)-agonists was 1.50 times higher (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 2.13) than before the stressful event occurred. Among those with low or no exposure to life events, the corresponding rate ratios were not elevated (rate ratio 0.81, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99 and 0.95, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.09 respectively). Conclusion: An increase in beta(2)-agonist usage after severe life events suggests that stressful experiences may worsen asthma symptoms.
  • Vuokko, Aki; Karvala, Kirsi; Suojalehto, Hille; Lindholm, Harri; Selinheimo, Sanna; Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja; Leppamaki, Sami; Cederstrom, Sebastian; Hublin, Christer; Tuisku, Katinka; Sainio, Markku (2019)
    Background: Chronic nonspecific symptoms attributed to indoor nonindustrial work environments are common and may cause disability, but the medical nature of this disability is unclear. The aim was to medically characterize the disability manifested by chronic, recurrent symptoms and restrictions to work participation attributed to low-level indoor pollutants at workplace and whether the condition shares features with idiopathic environmental intolerance. Methods: We investigated 12 patients with indoor air-related work disability. The examinations included somatic, psychological, and psychiatric evaluations as well as investigations of the autonomic nervous system, cortisol measurements, lung function, and allergy tests. We evaluated well-being, health, disability, insomnia, pain, anxiety, depression, and burnout via questionnaires. Results: The mean symptom history was 10.5 years; for disabling symptoms, 2.7 years. Eleven patients reported reactions triggered mainly by indoor molds, one by fragrances only. Ten reported sensitivity to odorous chemicals, and three, electric devices. Nearly all had co-occurrent somatic and psychiatric diagnoses and signs of pain, insomnia, burnout, and/or elevated sympathetic responses. Avoiding certain environments had led to restrictions in several life areas. On self-assessment scales, disability showed higher severity and anxiety showed lower severity than in physician assessments. Conclusion: No medical cause was found to explain the disability. Findings support that the condition is a form of idiopathic environmental intolerance and belongs to functional somatic syndromes. Instead of endless avoidance, rehabilitation approaches of functional somatic syndromes are applicable. (C) 2019 Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute, Published by Elsevier Korea LLC.
  • Kuzmin, Anton; Korhonen, Lauri; Kivinen, Sonja; Hurskainen, Pekka; Korpelainen, Pasi; Tanhuanpää, Topi; Maltamo, Matti; Vihervaara, Petteri; Kumpula, Timo (2021)
    European aspen (Populus tremula L.) is a keystone species for biodiversity of boreal forests.Large-diameter aspens maintain the diversity of hundreds of species, many of which are threatened in Fennoscandia. Due to a low economic value and relatively sparse and scattered occurrence of aspen in boreal forests, there is a lack of information of the spatial and temporal distribution of aspen, which hampers efficient planning and implementation of sustainable forest management practices and conservation efforts. Our objective was to assess identification of European aspen at the individual tree level in a southern boreal forest using high-resolution photogrammetric point cloud (PPC) and multispectral (MSP) orthomosaics acquired with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The structure-from-motion approach was applied to generate RGB imagery-based PPC to be used for individual tree-crown delineation. Multispectral data were collected using two UAV cameras:Parrot Sequoia and MicaSense RedEdge-M. Tree-crown outlines were obtained from watershed segmentation of PPC data and intersected with multispectral mosaics to extract and calculate spectral metrics for individual trees. We assessed the role of spectral data features extracted from PPC and multispectral mosaics and a combination of it, using a machine learning classifier—Support Vector Machine (SVM) to perform two different classifications: discrimination of aspen from the other species combined into one class and classification of all four species (aspen, birch, pine, spruce) simultaneously. In the first scenario, the highest classification accuracy of 84% (F1-score) for aspen and overall accuracy of 90.1% was achieved using only RGB features from PPC, whereas in the second scenario, the highest classification accuracy of 86 % (F1-score) for aspen and overall accuracy of 83.3% was achieved using the combination of RGB and MSP features. The proposed method provides a new possibility for the rapid assessment of aspen occurrence to enable more efficient forest management as well as contribute to biodiversity monitoring and conservation efforts in boreal forests.
  • Forsius, Martin; Kujala, Heini; Minunno, Francesco; Holmberg, Maria; Leikola, Niko; Mikkonen, Ninni; Autio, Iida; Paunu, Ville-Veikko; Tanhuanpää, Topi; Hurskainen, Pekka; Mäyrä, Janne; Kivinen, Sonja; Keski-Saari, Sarita; Kosenius, Anna-Kaisa; Kuusela, Saija; Virkkala, Raimo; Viinikka, Arto; Vihervaara, Petteri; Akujarvi, Anu; Bäck, Jaana; Karvosenoja, Niko; Kumpula, Timo; Kuzmin, Anton; Mäkelä, Annikki; Moilanen, Atte; Ollikainen, Markku; Pekkonen, Minna; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Poikolainen, Laura; Rankinen, Katri; Rasilo, Terhi; Tuominen, Sakari; Valkama, Jari; Vanhala, Pekka; Heikkinen, Risto K (2021)
    The challenges posed by climate change and biodiversity loss are deeply interconnected. Successful co-managing of these tangled drivers requires innovative methods that can prioritize and target management actions against multiple criteria, while also enabling cost-effective land use planning and impact scenario assessment. This paper synthesises the development and application of an integrated multidisciplinary modelling and evaluation framework for carbon and biodiversity in forest systems. By analysing and spatio-temporally modelling carbon processes and biodiversity elements, we determine an optimal solution for their co-management in the study landscape. We also describe how advanced Earth Observation measurements can be used to enhance mapping and monitoring of biodiversity and ecosystem processes. The scenarios used for the dynamic models were based on official Finnish policy goals for forest management and climate change mitigation. The development and testing of the system were executed in a large region in southern Finland (Kokemäenjoki basin, 27 024 km2) containing highly instrumented LTER (Long-Term Ecosystem Research) stations; these LTER data sources were complemented by fieldwork, remote sensing and national data bases. In the study area, estimated total net emissions were currently 4.2 TgCO2eq a-1, but modelling of forestry measures and anthropogenic emission reductions demonstrated that it would be possible to achieve the stated policy goal of carbon neutrality by low forest harvest intensity. We show how this policy-relevant information can be further utilised for optimal allocation of set-aside forest areas for nature conservation, which would significantly contribute to preserving both biodiversity and carbon values in the region. Biodiversity gain in the area could be increased without a loss of carbon-related benefits.
  • Häkkilä, Matti; Savilaakso, Sini; Johansson, Anna; Sandgren, Terhi; Uusitalo, Anne; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Puttonen, Pasi (2019)
    Forest harvesting is the main driver of habitat degradation and biodiversity loss in forests of the boreal zone. To mitigate harmful effects, small-scale habitats with high biodiversity values have been protected within production forests. These include woodland key habitats, and other small-scale habitat patches protected by voluntary conservation action. This article describes a protocol for a systematic review to synthesize the value of small habitat patches left within production landscapes for biodiversity. The topic for this systematic review arose from a discussion with the Finnish forestry sector and was further defined in a stakeholder workshop. Research question: Do small protected habitat patches within production forests provide value for biodiversity conservation in boreal forests? Animal, plant and fungal diversities are addressed as well as the amount of deadwood within the habitat patches as proxy indicators for biodiversity.
  • Flink, Niko; Honkalampi, Kirsi; Lehto, Soili M.; Viinamaki, Heimo; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli; Valkonen-Korhonen, Minna; Lindeman, Sari (2019)
    Background Schema therapy has been proposed as a potentially effective treatment for chronic depression. However, little is known about early maladaptive schemas (EMSs), a key concept in schema therapy, in relation to chronic depression or chronic depression with comorbid personality pathology. The aim of the present study was to compare EMSs between currently chronically depressed patients with comorbid cluster C personality disorder (CDCPD), currently chronically depressed patients (CD), and patients remitted from chronic depression (CDR). Methods Based on data from a naturalistic follow-up study on psychiatric outpatients with major depressive disorder, three groups were formed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV: CDCPD (n = 15), CD (n = 23), and CDR (n = 13). Groups were compared in terms of background information and measurements for depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and EMSs (Young Schema Questionnaire). Results Patients with CDCPD and CD did not differ in terms of background variables or the severity of depressive symptoms, but patients with CDCPD were more maladaptive with respect to the majority of EMSs. Patients with CDR were less depressed than CDCPD or CD patients, but did not differ in terms of EMSs compared with CD patients. Conclusions Comorbid cluster C personality disorder appears to be associated with more severe EMS endorsement in chronically depressed patients. Remitted patients show similar cognitive vulnerability factors in terms of EMSs compared to those currently chronically depressed. The findings suggest that EMSs may contribute to vulnerability to chronic depression. Focusing on EMSs may be beneficial in the treatment of chronic depression.
  • Markkula, N.; Lehti, V.; Adhikari, P.; Pena, S.; Heliste, J.; Mikkonen, E.; Rautanen, M.; Salama, E.; Guragain, B. (2019)
    Background. An essential strategy to increase coverage of psychosocial treatments globally is task shifting to non-medical counsellors, but evidence on its effectiveness is still scarce. This study evaluates the effectiveness of lay psychosocial counselling among persons with psychological distress in a primary health care setting in rural Nepal. Methods. A parallel randomized controlled trial in Dang, rural Nepal (NCT03544450). Persons aged 16 and older attending primary care and with a General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) score of 6 or more were randomized (1:1) to receive either non-medical psychosocial counselling (PSY) or enhanced usual care (EUC). PSY was provided by lay persons with a 6-month training and consisted of 5-weekly counselling sessions of 35-60 min with a culturally adapted solution-focused approach. EUC was provided by trained primary health workers. Participants were followed up at 1 (T1) and 6 months (T2). The primary outcome, response to treatment, was the reduction of minimum 50% in the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score. Results. A total of 141 participants, predominantly socially disadvantaged women, were randomized to receive PSY and 146 to EUC. In the PSY, 123 participants and 134 in the EUC were analysed. In PSY, 101 participants (81.4%) had a response compared with 57 participants (42.5%) in EUC [percentage difference 39.4% (95% CI 28.4-50.4)]. The difference in BDI scores at T2 between PSY and EUC was -7.43 (95% CI -9.71 to -5.14). Conclusions. Non-medical (lay) psychosocial counselling appears effective in reducing depressive symptoms, and its inclusion in mental health care should be considered in low-resource settings.
  • Vauhkonen, Jari (2020)
    Key Message Tree-level forest inventory data are becoming increasingly available, which motivates the use of these data for decision-making. However, airborne inventories carried out tree-by-tree typically include systematic errors, which can propagate to objective function variables used to determine optimal forest management. Effects of under-detection focused on the smallest trees on predicted immediate harvest profits and future expectation values were assessed assuming different sites and interest rates. Management decisions based on the erroneous information caused losses of 0-17% of the total immediate and future expected income of Scots pine stands. Context Optimal decisions on how to manage forest stands can depend on the absence or presence of intermediate and understory trees. Yet, these tree strata are likely prone to inventory errors. Aims The aim of this study is to examine implications of making stand management decisions based on data that include systematic errors resembling those typically observed in airborne inventories carried out tree-by-tree. Methods Stand management instructions were developed based on theoretical diameter distribution functions simulated to have different shape, scale, and frequency parameters corresponding to various degrees of under-detection focused on the smallest trees. Immediate harvest income and future expectation value were derived based on various management alternatives simulated. Results Errors in diameter distributions affected the predicted harvest profits and future expectation values differently between the simulated alternatives and depending on site type and interest rate assumptions. As a result, different alternatives were considered as optimal management compared to the use of the error-free reference distributions. In particular, the use of no management or most intensive management alternatives became preferred over alternatives with intermediate harvesting intensities. Certain harvesting types such as thinning from below became preferred more often than what was optimal. The errors did not affect the selection of the management alternative in 71% of the simulations, whereas in the remaining proportion, relying on the erroneous information would have caused losing 2%, on average, and 17% at maximum, of the total immediate and future expected income. Conclusion The effects above might not have been discovered, if the results were validated for inventory totals instead of separately considering the immediate and future income and losses produced by the erroneous decisions. It is recommended not to separate but to integrate the inventory and planning systems for well-informed decisions.
  • Ämmälä, Antti-Jussi; Urrila, Anna-Sofia; Lahtinen, Aleksandra; Santangeli, Olena; Hakkarainen, Antti; Kantojärvi, Katri; Castaneda, Anu E.; Lundbom, Nina; Marttunen, Mauri; Paunio, Tiina (2019)
    Objectives: This study aimed to test the hypothesis that sleep and depression have independent effects on brain development and plasticity in adolescents, and that these changes are reflected in changes in the epigenome. Methods: Participants were 17 medication-free adolescent boys (age 16.05 +/- 0.80 years, mean +/- standard deviation (SD); eight cases with depression and sleep symptoms, nine healthy controls). Sleep was assessed by polysomnography recordings and the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS) and Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS). Participants underwent a clinical evaluation. DNA methylation of blood leukocytes was measured by Illumina 450K array, and Ingenuity Pathway analysis was applied to identify the most significant pathways with differentially methylated positions (DMPs). Secondary analysis of the identified loci included linear correlations between methylation and the subjectively rated scales of sleep, depression and sleep microarchitecture. Results: Due to small sample size, we found no genome-wide significant differences in methylation between cases and controls. However, pathway analysis identified the synaptic long-term depression (LTD) canonical pathway (p = 0.00045) when the best 500 DMPs from the original case-control design were included. A flattened dissipation of slow wave sleep, tiredness and depression severity values correlated with five of 10 sites from the LTD pathway (IGF1R, PLAG16, PLA2R1, PPP2C5 and ERK12) in the secondary analysis when the case-control status was controlled for. Conclusion: Among adolescents, depressive disorder with sleep symptoms is associated with a distinctive epigenetic pattern of DNA methylation in blood leukocytes. The enrichment of DMPs on genes related to synaptic LTD emphasizes the role of sleep in synaptic plasticity and the widespread physiological consequences of disturbed sleep. (C) 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Kansanen, Kasper; Vauhkonen, Jari; Lahivaara, Timo; Seppanen, Aku; Maltamo, Matti; Mehtatalo, Lauri (2019)
    Errors in individual tree detection and delineation affect diameter distribution predictions based on crown attributes extracted from the detected trees. We develop a methodology for circumventing these problems. The method is based on matching cumulative distribution functions of field measured tree diameter distributions and crown radii distributions extracted from airborne laser scanning data through individual tree detection presented by Vauhkonen and Mehtatalo (2015). In this study, empirical distribution functions and a monotonic, nonlinear model curve are introduced. Tree crown radius distribution produced by individual tree detection is corrected by a method taking into account that all trees cannot be detected. The evaluation is based on the ability of the developed model sequence to predict quadratic mean diameter and total basal area. The studied data consists of 36 field plots in a typical boreal managed forest area in eastern Finland. The suggested enhancements to the model sequence produce improved results in most of the test cases. Most notably, in leaveone-out cross-validation experiments the modified models improve RMSE of basal area 13% in the full data and RMSE of quadratic mean diameter and basal area 69% and 11%, respectively, in pure pine plots. Better modeling of the crown radius distribution and improved matching between crown radii and stem diameters add the operational premises of the full distribution matching.
  • Tanhuanpää, Topi; Saarinen, Ninni; Kankare, Ville; Nurminen, Kimmo; Vastaranta, Mikko; Honkavaara, Eija; Karjalainen, Mika; Yu, Xiaowei; Holopainen, Markus; Hyyppä, Juha (2016)
    Height models based on high-altitude aerial images provide a low-cost means of generating detailed 3D models of the forest canopy. In this study, the performance of these height models in the detection of individual trees was evaluated in a commercially managed boreal forest. Airborne digital stereo imagery (DSI) was captured from a flight altitude of 5 km with a ground sample distance of 50 cm and corresponds to regular national topographic airborne data capture programs operated in many countries. Tree tops were detected from smoothed canopy height models (CHM) using watershed segmentation. The relative amount of detected trees varied between 26% and 140%, and the RMSE of plot-level arithmetic mean height between 2.2 m and 3.1 m. Both the dominant tree species and the filter used for smoothing affected the results. Even though the spatial resolution of DSI-based CHM was sufficient, detecting individual trees from the data proved to be demanding because of the shading effect of the dominant trees and the limited amount of data from lower canopy levels and near the ground.
  • Riihimaki, K.; Sintonen, H.; Vuorilehto, M.; Jylhä, P.; Saarni, S.; Isometsa, E. (2016)
    Background: Depressive disorders are known to impair health-related quality of life (HRQoL) both in the short and long term. However, the determinants of long-term HRQoL outcomes in primary care patients with depressive disorders remain unclear. Methods: In a primary care cohort study of patients with depressive disorders, 82% of 137 patients were prospectively followed up for five years. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed with SCID-I/P and SCID-II interviews; clinical, psychosocial and socio-economic factors were investigated by rating scales and questionnaires plus medical and psychiatric records. HRQoL was measured with the generic 15D instrument at baseline and five years, and compared with an age-standardized general population sample (n = 3707) at five years. Results: Depression affected the 15D total score and almost all dimensions at both time points. At the end of follow-up, HRQoL of patients in major depressive episode (MDE) was particularly low, and the association between severity of depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]) and HRQoL was very strong (r = -0.804). The most significant predictors for change in HRQoL were changes in BDI and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) scores. The mean 15D score of depressive primary care patients at five years was much worse than in the age-standardized general population, reaching normal range only among patients who were in clinical remission and had virtually no symptoms. Conclusions: Among depressive primary care patients, presence of current depressive symptoms markedly reduces HRQoL, with symptoms of concurrent anxiety also having a marked impact. For HRQoL to normalize, current depressive and anxiety symptoms must be virtually absent. (C) 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
  • Viskari, Toni; Laine, Maisa; Kulmala, Liisa; Mäkelä, Jarmo; Fer, Istem; Liski, Jari (2020)
    Model-calculated forecasts of soil organic carbon (SOC) are important for approximating global terrestrial carbon pools and assessing their change. However, the lack of detailed observations limits the reliability and applicability of these SOC projections. Here, we studied whether state data assimilation (SDA) can be used to continuously update the modeled state with available total carbon measurements in order to improve future SOC estimations. We chose six fallow test sites with measurement time series spanning 30 to 80 years for this initial test. In all cases, SDA improved future projections but to varying degrees. Furthermore, already including the first few measurements impacted the state enough to reduce the error in decades-long projections by at least 1 tCha(-1). Our results show the benefits of implementing SDA methods for forecasting SOC as well as highlight implementation aspects that need consideration and further research.
  • Hintsa, Taina; Elovainio, Marko; Jokela, Markus; Ahola, Kirsi; Virtanen, Marianna; Pirkola, Sami (2016)
    Burnout has been suggested to be related to depression. We examined the relationship between burnout and allostatic load, and whether this association is independent of psychological distress and depression. We measured burnout psychological distress, depression, and allostatic load in 3283 participants. Higher burnout (=0.06, p=0.003) and cynicism (=0.03, p=0.031) and decreased professional efficacy (=0.03, p=0.007) were related to higher allostatic load independent of age, sex, education, occupation and psychological distress. Depression, however, explained 60percent of the association. Burnout is related to higher allostatic load, and this association partly overlaps with co-occurring depression.