Browsing by Subject "ISOPRENE EPOXYDIOLS"

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  • Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Budisulistiorini, Sri H.; Zhang, Haofei; Surratt, Jason D.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Canagaratna, Manjula R. (2016)
    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS-MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI-IMS-MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambient field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS-MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS-MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS-MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS-MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of oligomers, and confirm the presence of the organosulfate functional group.
  • Rizzo, Luciana Varanda; Roldin, Pontus; Brito, Joel; Backman, John; Swietlicki, Erik; Krejci, Radovan; Tunved, Peter; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Artaxo, Paulo (2018)
    The Amazon Basin is a unique region to study atmospheric aerosols, given their relevance for the regional hydrological cycle and the large uncertainty of their sources. Multi-year datasets are crucial when contrasting periods of natural conditions and periods influenced by anthropogenic emissions. In the wet season, biogenic sources and processes prevail, and the Amazonian atmospheric composition resembles preindustrial conditions. In the dry season, the basin is influenced by widespread biomass burning emissions. This work reports multi-year observations of high time resolution submicrometer (10-600 nm) particle number size distributions at a rain forest site in Amazonia (TT34 tower, 60 km NW from Manaus city), between 2008 and 2010 and 2012 and 2014. The median particle number concentration was 403 cm(-3) in the wet season and 1254 cm(-3) in the dry season. The Aitken mode (similar to 30-100 nm in diameter) was prominent during the wet season, while the accumulation mode (similar to 100-600 nm in diameter) dominated the particle size spectra during the dry season. Cluster analysis identified groups of aerosol number size distributions influenced by convective downdrafts, nucleation events and fresh biomass burning emissions. New particle formation and subsequent growth was rarely observed during the 749 days of observations, similar to previous observations in the Amazon Basin. A stationary 1-D column model (ADCHEM Aerosol Dynamics, gas and particle phase CHEMistry and radiative transfer model) was used to assess the importance of the processes behind the observed diurnal particle size distribution trends. Three major particle source types are required in the model to reproduce the observations: (i) a surface source of particles in the evening, possibly related to primary biological emissions; (ii) entrainment of accumulation mode aerosols in the morning; and (iii) convective downdrafts transporting Aitken mode particles into the boundary layer mostly during the afternoon. The latter process has the largest influence on the modeled particle number size distributions. However, convective downdrafts are often associated with rain and, thus, act as both a source of Aitken mode particles and a sink of accumulation mode particles, causing a net reduction in the median total particle number concentrations in the surface layer. Our study shows that the combination of the three mentioned particle sources is essential to sustain particle number concentrations in Amazonia.
  • Moller, Kristian H.; Kurten, Theo; Bates, Kelvin H.; Thornton, Joel A.; Kjaergaard, Henrik G. (2019)
    Epoxide formation was established a decade ago as a possible reaction pathway for beta-hydroperoxy alkyl radicals in the atmosphere. This epoxide-forming pathway required excess energy to compete with O-2 addition, as the thermal reaction rate coefficient is many orders of magnitude too slow. However, recently, a thermal epoxide forming reaction was discovered in the ISOPOOH + OH oxidation pathway. Here, we computationally investigate the effect of substituents on the epoxide formation rate coefficient of a series of substituted beta-hydroperoxy alkyl radicals. We find that the thermal reaction is likely to be competitive with O-2 addition when the alkyl radical carbon has a OH group, which is able to form a hydrogen bond to a substituent on the other carbon atom in the epoxide ring being formed. Reactants fulfilling these requirements can be formed in the OH-initiated oxidation of many biogenic hydrocarbons. Further, we find that beta-OOR alkyl radicals react similarly to beta-OOH alkyl radicals, making epoxide formation a possible decomposition pathway in the oxidation of ROOR peroxides. GEOS-Chem modeling shows that the total annual production of isoprene dihydroxy hydroperoxy epoxide is 23 Tg, making it by far the most abundant C-5-tetrafunctional species from isoprene oxidation.