Browsing by Subject "ISRAEL"

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  • Peddinti, Gopal; Bergman, Michael; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Groop, Leif (2019)
    Context: Early prediction of dysglycemia is crucial to prevent progression to type 2 diabetes. The 1-hour postload plasma glucose (PG) is reported to be a better predictor of dysglycemia than fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-hour PG, or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Objective: To evaluate the predictive performance of clinical markers, metabolites, HbA1c, and PG and serum insulin (INS) levels during a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Design and Setting: We measured PG and INS levels at 0, 30, 60, and 120 minutes during an OGTT in 543 participants in the Botnia Prospective Study, 146 of whom progressed to type 2 diabetes within a 10-year follow-up period. Using combinations of variables, we evaluated 1527 predictive models for progression to type 2 diabetes. Results: The 1-hour PG outperformed every individual marker except 30-minute PG or mannose, whose predictive performances were lower but not significantly worse. HbA1c was inferior to 1-hour PG according to DeLong test P value but not false discovery rate. Combining the metabolic markers with PG measurements and HbA1c significantly improved the predictive models, and mannose was found to be a robust metabolic marker. Conclusions: The 1-hour PG, alone or in combination with metabolic markers, is a robust predictor for determining the future risk of type 2 diabetes, outperforms the 2-hour PG, and is cheaper to measure than metabolites. Metabolites add to the predictive value of PG and HbA1c measurements. Shortening the standard 75-g OGTT to 1 hour improves its predictive value and clinical usability.
  • Kletter, Raz (2015)
    This paper reviews the forgotten history of the museum of the Israel Department of Antiquities and Museums (hereafter IDAM) in Jerusalem, which until 1965 was the central archaeological museum of the State of Israel. From its humble beginnings with a small temporary exhibition in 1949, the creators of this museum gathered together a large and important collection of antiquities. These founders hoped to create the cornerstone for the future new central museum of Israel. However, the State entrusted the general manager of the Prime Minister’s office, Tedi Kollek with the establishment of this new museum. In 1962, Avraham Biran, who worked closely with Kollek, was appointed director of IDAM. Biran eventually transferred the treasures of the IDAM to the new Bronfman Museum, the archaeological section of the Israel Museum.
  • Odeh, Issam; Arar, Sharif; Al-Hunaiti, Afnan; Sa'aydeh, Hiyam; Hammad, Ghada; Duplissy, Jonathan; Vuollekoski, Henri; Korpela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Hussein, Tareq (2017)
    The quality and chemical composition of urban dew collections with dust precipitates without pre-cleaning of the collecting surface WSF (white standard foil) were investigated for 16 out of 20 collected samples with collected volumes ranging from 22 to 230 ml. The collection period was from March to July 2015 at an urban area, Jubaiha, which is located in the northern part of the capital city Amman, Jordan. The obtained results indicated the predominance of Ca2+ and SO42- ions (ratio 2.2: 1) that originated from Saharan soil dust; where the collected samples were alkaline (mean pH = 7.35) with high mineralization (429.22 mg/L) exceeding the previously reported dew values in Amman-Jordan. A relocation of NaCl and to a less extent Mg2+ from sea to land by Saharan wind is indicated by the percent sea-salt fraction calculations (over 100 and 52, respectively). The collected samples exhibited high total organic carbon (TOC) values ranging from 11.86 to 74.60 mg/L, presence of particulate settled material with turbidity ranging from 20.10 to 520.00 NTU, and presence of undesired elements like boron (mean = 1.48 mg/L) that made it different in properties from other dew water collections at clean surfaces, and exceeding the standard limits for drinking water for these parameters set by Jordanian Drinking Water standards (JS286/2015)/WHO standard. The quality of this water is more close to that for raw or agricultural water but if it is meant to be used as potable source of water, at least sand and activated charcoal filters are needed to purify it.
  • Lucke, Bernhard; Sandler, Amir; Vanselow, Kim André; Bruins, Hendrik J.; Abu-Jaber, Nizar; Baeumler, Rupert; Porat, Naomi; Kouki, Paula (2019)
    Archaeological structures are often filled with sediments and may serve as effective dust traps. The physical parameters and chemical composition of archaeological soils in hilltop ruins, ancient runoff-collecting terraces, and cleanout spoils of cisterns were determined in the Petra region in southern Jordan and the Northern Negev in Israel. Different types of ruins are characterized by certain soil structures, but could not be distinguished with regard to substrate composition. This reflects a predominance of aeolian processes for primary sedimentation, while fluvial processes seem to only re-distribute aeolian material. In the Petra region, the physical and chemical properties of all archaeological soils show a significant local contribution from associated weathered rocks. Compared to modern settled dust, archaeological soils in Southern Jordan are enriched with various major and trace elements associated with clays and oxide coatings of fine silt particles. This seems connected with preferential fixation of silt and clay by surface crusts, and a role of moisture in sedimentation processes as calcareous silt was found to be deposited in greater amounts when associated with precipitation. In contrast, the contribution of rocks is negligible in the Negev due to greater rock hardness and abundant biological crusts that seal surfaces. Archaeological soils in the Negev are chemically similar to current settled dust, which consists of complex mixtures of local and remote sources, including significant portions of recycled material from paleosols. Archaeological soils are archives of Holocene dust sources and aeolian sedimentation processes, with accretion rates exceeding those of Pleistocene hilltop loess in the Negev. Comparison with Pleistocene paleosols suggests that dust sources did not change significantly, but disappearance of snow could have reduced dust accumulation during the Holocene.
  • Vuollekoski, H.; Vogt, M.; Sinclair, V. A.; Duplissy, J.; Jarvinen, H.; Kyro, E. -M.; Makkonen, R.; Petaja, T.; Prisle, N. L.; Räisänen, P.; Sipila, M.; Ylhaisi, J.; Kulmala, M. (2015)
  • Kletter, Raz (2014)
    Archaeology cannot find ethnicity "independently", but only with the help of written sources. The way one defines "ethnicity" is critical to ones' conclusions. Ethnic groups, as a type of imagined community, most likely existed already in prehistory; but without written sources, at least a collective name, we cannot fish them out. The article reviews a series of papers which try, in vain, to 'get' to ethnicity from material remains; and another series which tries, in vain, to prove (or refute) "Iron I Ethnic Israel". Bagira appears in a photo in the text.
  • Vuorinen, Anssi L.; Kalendar, Ruslan; Fahima, Tzion; Korpelainen, Helena; Nevo, Eviatar; Schulman, Alan H. (2018)
    Wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides) is the wild ancestor of all cultivated tetraploid and hexaploid wheats and harbors a large amount of genetic diversity. This diversity is expected to display eco-geographical patterns of variation, conflating gene flow, and local adaptation. As self-replicating entities comprising the bulk of genomic DNA in wheat, retrotransposons are expected to create predominantly neutral variation via their propagation. Here, we have examined the genetic diversity of 1 Turkish and 14 Israeli populations of wild emmer wheat, based on the retrotransposon marker methods IRAP and REMAP. The level of genetic diversity we detected was in agreement with previous studies that were performed with a variety of marker systems assaying genes and other genomic components. The genetic distances failed to correlate with the geographical distances, suggesting local selection on geographically widespread haplotypes (‘weak selection’). However, the proportion of polymorphic loci correlated with the population latitude, which may reflect the temperature and water availability cline. Genetic diversity correlated with longitude, the east being more montane. Principal component analyses on the marker data separated most of the populations.