Browsing by Subject "Immigrants"

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  • Adebayo, Folasade A.; Itkonen, Suvi T.; Koponen, Päivikki; Prättälä, Ritva; Härkänen, Tommi; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel; Erkkola, Maijaliisa (2017)
    Aims: We evaluated the consumption of healthy foods among Russian, Somali and Kurdish immigrants in Finland, and examined the relationship between socio-demographic factors and food consumption. Methods: We used data from the Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study (Maamu), a population-based health interview and examination survey in six different municipalities in Finland between 2010 and 2012. Altogether, 635 men and 737 women, aged 18-64 years, of Russian (n = 527), Somali (n = 337) and Kurdish (n = 508) origin were included. The important socio-demographic determinants of healthy food consumption - sex, age, education, place of residence and household size - were assessed by logistic regression. Results: Based on the consumption frequencies of recommended healthy foods - fruits, berries, vegetables, fish and rye bread - immigrants of Russian origin had higher consumption of healthy foods than their peers of Kurdish and Somali origin. Low consumption of fresh vegetables, fruits and berries was found among Somali immigrants. Sex and age were the most important determinants of healthy food consumption, as women and older age groups had diets closer to the national nutrition recommendations. High educational level was also positively associated with healthy food consumption. Conclusions: We found ethnic differences in the consumption of healthy foods among the immigrant groups of Russian, Somali and Kurdish origin in Finland. Socio-demographic factors, especially age, sex and education, seem to also play an important role in immigrants' food consumption. Further studies examining the consumption of fruits, berries and fresh vegetables among Somali immigrants in Finland are needed.
  • Idehen, Esther E.; Koponen, Päivikki; Härkänen, Tommi; Kangasniemi, Mari; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Korhonen, Tellervo (2018)
    Background: Cervical cancer is currently ranked as the fourth commonly diagnosed cancer in women globally. A higher incidence has been reported in low- and-middle-income countries, and the disease poses significant public health challenges. Evidence suggests that this disease is preventable by means of regular screening using the Papanicolaou (Pap) test. However, limited knowledge exists about disparities in cervical screening participation among immigrants compared with non-immigrants, in countries with universal cervical screening programmes. We aimed to examine disparities in cervical screening participation among women of Russian, Somali, and Kurdish, origin in Finland, comparing them with the general Finnish population (Finns). We controlled for differences in several socio-demographic and health-related variables as potential confounders. Methods: We employed data from the Finnish Migrant Health and Well-being Study 2010-2012 and the National Health 2011 Survey. Data collection involved face-to-face interviews. Data on screening participation in the previous five years from women aged 29-60 were available from 537 immigrants (257 Russians, 113 Somalis, 167 Kurds) and from 436 Finns. For statistical analyses, we used multiple logistic regression. Results: Age-adjusted screening participation rates were as follows: Russians 79% (95% Cl 72.9-84.4), Somalis 41% (95% Cl 31.4-50.1), and Kurds 64% (95% Cl 57.2-70.8), compared with 94% (95% Cl 91.4-95.9) among Finns. After additionally adjusting for socio-demographic and health-related confounders, all the immigrant groups showed a significantly lower likelihood of screening participation when compared with Finns. The Odds Ratios were as follows: Russians 0.32 (95% Cl 0.18-0.58), Somalis 0.10 (95% Cl 0.04-0.23), and Kurds 0.17 (95% Cl 0.09-0.35). However, when additionally accounting for country of origin-confounder interactions, such differences were attenuated. Conclusions: Our results indicate disparities in screening participation among these immigrants and a lower likelihood of screening participation compared with the general Finnish population. To improve equity in cervical cancer screening participation, appropriate culturally tailored intervention programmes for each immigrant group might be beneficial.
  • Idehen, Esther E; Koponen, Päivikki; Härkänen, Tommi; Kangasniemi, Mari; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Korhonen, Tellervo (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Cervical cancer is currently ranked as the fourth commonly diagnosed cancer in women globally. A higher incidence has been reported in low- and-middle-income countries, and the disease poses significant public health challenges. Evidence suggests that this disease is preventable by means of regular screening using the Papanicolaou (Pap) test. However, limited knowledge exists about disparities in cervical screening participation among immigrants compared with non-immigrants, in countries with universal cervical screening programmes. We aimed to examine disparities in cervical screening participation among women of Russian, Somali, and Kurdish, origin in Finland, comparing them with the general Finnish population (Finns). We controlled for differences in several socio-demographic and health-related variables as potential confounders. Methods We employed data from the Finnish Migrant Health and Well-being Study 2010–2012 and the National Health 2011 Survey. Data collection involved face-to-face interviews. Data on screening participation in the previous five years from women aged 29–60 were available from 537 immigrants (257 Russians, 113 Somalis, 167 Kurds) and from 436 Finns. For statistical analyses, we used multiple logistic regression. Results Age-adjusted screening participation rates were as follows: Russians 79% (95% CI 72.9–84.4), Somalis 41% (95% CI 31.4–50.1), and Kurds 64% (95% CI 57.2–70.8), compared with 94% (95% CI 91.4–95.9) among Finns. After additionally adjusting for socio-demographic and health-related confounders, all the immigrant groups showed a significantly lower likelihood of screening participation when compared with Finns. The Odds Ratios were as follows: Russians 0.32 (95% CI 0.18–0.58), Somalis 0.10 (95% CI 0.04–0.23), and Kurds 0.17 (95% CI 0.09–0.35). However, when additionally accounting for country of origin-confounder interactions, such differences were attenuated. Conclusions Our results indicate disparities in screening participation among these immigrants and a lower likelihood of screening participation compared with the general Finnish population. To improve equity in cervical cancer screening participation, appropriate culturally tailored intervention programmes for each immigrant group might be beneficial.
  • Heimo, Anne; Salmi-Niklander, Kirsti Anneli (2019)
    The article is based on our fieldwork among Finnish immigrant communities in Australia, Canada and the United States. Reading was highly valued, and in addition to publications brought and sent from Finland, Finnish communities were active publishers of books, newspapers and documents and maintained libraries. Today many of these activities take place in different forms on the Internet, blogs, Facebook and other social media and websites. For many, Finnish books and other forms of print continue to be cherished artefacts, although they no longer understand Finnish. In this article we focus on some specific issues we have encountered while studying the reading cultures of Finnish immigrant communities in North America and Australia. Our research material consists of interviews conducted among people of Finnish ancestry, life writings and other archival records as well as online and offline publications produced and maintained by these communities. We see that the study of immigrant reading cultures requires the applying of mixed methods: interviewing, the narrative analysis of various types of ‘memory texts’, participant observation, Internet and book ethnography and visual documentation. In immigrant communities fieldwork is often highly interactive, because the researcher is also expected to act as translator and interpreter of documents related to family and community history, which the members of the community themselves can no longer understand.
  • Idehen, Esther E.; Korhonen, Tellervo; Castaneda, Anu; Juntunen, Teppo; Kangasniemi, Mari; Pietila, Anna-Maija; Koponen, Paivikki (2017)
    Background: Previous studies revealed low participation in cervical cancer screening among immigrants compared with non-immigrants. Only a few studies about factors associated with immigrants' lower participation rates have been conducted in European countries that have universal access for all eligible women. Our study aimed to explore factors associated with cervical screening participation among women of Russian, Somali, and Kurdish origin in Finland. Methods: We used data from the Migrant Health and Well-being Survey, 2010-2012. Structured face-to-face interviews of groups of immigrants aged 25-60 yielded 620 responses concerning screening participation in the previous five years. Statistical analysis employed logistic regression. Results: The age-adjusted participation rates were as follows: among women of Russian origin 73.9% (95% CI 68.1-79.7), for Somalis 34.7% (95% CI 26.4-43.0), and for Kurds 61.3% (95% CI 55.0-67.7). Multiple logistic regressions showed that the most significant factor increasing the likelihood of screening participation among all groups was having had at least one gynecological check-up in the previous five years (Odds ratio [OR] = 6.54-26.2; p <0.001). Other factors were higher education (OR = 2.63; p = 0.014), being employed (OR = 4.31; p = 0.007), and having given birth (OR = 9.34; p= 0.014), among Kurds; and literacy in Finnish/Swedish (OR = 3.63; p = 0.003) among Russians. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that women who refrain from using reproductive health services, those who are unemployed and less educated, as well as those with poor language proficiency, might need more information on the importance of screening participation. Primary and occupational healthcare services may have a significant role in informing immigrant women about this importance.
  • Idehen, Esther E; Korhonen, Tellervo; Castaneda, Anu; Juntunen, Teppo; Kangasniemi, Mari; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Koponen, Päivikki (BioMed Central, 2017)
    Abstract Background Previous studies revealed low participation in cervical cancer screening among immigrants compared with non-immigrants. Only a few studies about factors associated with immigrants’ lower participation rates have been conducted in European countries that have universal access for all eligible women. Our study aimed to explore factors associated with cervical screening participation among women of Russian, Somali, and Kurdish origin in Finland. Methods We used data from the Migrant Health and Well-being Survey, 2010-2012. Structured face-to-face interviews of groups of immigrants aged 25-60 yielded 620 responses concerning screening participation in the previous five years. Statistical analysis employed logistic regression. Results The age-adjusted participation rates were as follows: among women of Russian origin 73.9% (95% CI 68.1-79.7), for Somalis 34.7% (95% CI 26.4-43.0), and for Kurds 61.3% (95% CI 55.0-67.7). Multiple logistic regressions showed that the most significant factor increasing the likelihood of screening participation among all groups was having had at least one gynecological check-up in the previous five years (Odds ratio [OR] = 6.54-26.2; p < 0.001). Other factors were higher education (OR = 2.63; p = 0.014), being employed (OR = 4.31; p = 0.007), and having given birth (OR = 9.34; p = 0.014), among Kurds; and literacy in Finnish/Swedish (OR = 3.63; p = 0.003) among Russians. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that women who refrain from using reproductive health services, those who are unemployed and less educated, as well as those with poor language proficiency, might need more information on the importance of screening participation. Primary and occupational healthcare services may have a significant role in informing immigrant women about this importance.
  • Kieseppä, Valentina; Torniainen-Holm, Minna; Jokela, Markus; Suvisaari, Jaana; Gissler, Mika; Markkula, Niina; Lehti, Venla (2020)
    Purpose Many aspects related to migration might predispose immigrants to mental health problems. Yet immigrants have been shown to underuse mental health services. The aim of this study was to compare the intensity of psychiatric care, as an indicator of treatment adequacy, between natives and immigrants living in Finland. Methods We used nationwide register data that included all the immigrants living in Finland at the end of 2010 (n = 185,605) and their matched controls. Only those who had used mental health services were included in the analyses (n = 14,285). We used multinomial logistic regression to predict the categorized treatment intensity by immigrant status, region and country of origin, length of residence, and other background variables. Results Immigrants used mental health services less than Finnish controls and with lower intensity. The length of residence in Finland increased the probability of higher treatment intensity. Immigrants from Eastern Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and Northern Africa were at the highest risk of receiving low-intensity treatment. Conclusions Some immigrant groups seem to persistently receive less psychiatric treatment than Finnish-born controls. Identification of these groups is important and future research is needed to determine the mechanisms behind these patterns.
  • Haavisto, Camilla (Forskningsinstitutet, Svenska social- och kommunalhögskolan vid Helsingfors universitet, 2011)
    Meddelanden
  • Silwal, Sanju; Lehti, Venla; Chudal, Roshan; Suominen, Auli; Lien, Lars; Sourander, Andre (2019)
    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between parental immigration status and a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in their offspring. Methods: This nested matched case-control study was based on a Finnish national birth cohort for 1987-2010 and cases were diagnosed with PTSD by 2012 from the Care Register for Health Care. We identified 3639 cases and 14,434 controls individually matched for gender, place and date of birth ( +/- 30 days). Conditional logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the association between parental immigration status, parents' region of birth and time since paternal immigration, and PTSD after controlling for confounding factors. Results: The likelihood of being diagnosed with PTSD was significantly increased among children with an immigrant father (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3 - 2.4) than those with two Finnish parents and one immigrant mother. There was no significant association between having an immigrant mother or two immigrant parents and receiving a diagnosis of PTSD. The likelihood of being diagnosed with PTSD was increased if the children's fathers had migrated less than five years before their birth (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.03 - 1.9) and if their immigrant fathers had been born in North Africa or the Middle East (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.4 - 3.3). Limitations: The sample included a heterogeneous migrant group without information on the reason for migration. The cases were identified from hospital diagnosis that may have only included severe cases. Conclusion: The increased likelihood of a diagnosis of PTSD underlines the need for psychosocial services among second-generation immigrants.
  • Adebayo, Folasade A.; Itkonen, Suvi T.; Lilja, Eero; Jaaskelainen, Tuija; Lundqvist, Annamari; Laatikainen, Tiina; Koponen, Paivikki; Cashman, Kevin D.; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel (2020)
    Objective: We investigated the determinants of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [S-25(OH)D] and dietary vitamin D sources among three immigrant groups in Finland and compared their S-25(OH)D to the general Finnish population. Design: Cross-sectional population-based Migrant Health and Wellbeing Study and the nationally representative Finnish Health 2011 Survey. S-25(OH)D was standardised according to the Vitamin D Standardisation Program. Vitamin D sources were assessed by interview. Setting: Six different municipalities in Finland (60 degrees-63 degrees N). Participants: Immigrants aged 18-64 years (446 Russians, 346 Somalis, 500 Kurds), 798 Finns aged 30-64 years. Results: The mean of S-25(OH)D was 64 (95 % CI 62, 66), 44 (95 % CI 41, 46), 35 (95 % CI 34, 37) and 64 (95 % CI 62, 66) nmol/l for Russians, Somalis, Kurds and Finns, respectively. S-25(OH)D among Somalis and Kurds was lower compared with Finns (P <0 center dot 001). The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (S-25(OH)D
  • Markkula, Niina; Cabieses, Baltica; Lehti, Venla; Uphoff, Eleonora; Astorga, Sofia; Stutzin, Francisca (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Migrant children have specific health needs, and may face difficulties in accessing health care, but not enough is known about their health service use. This study aims to describe patterns of use of health services of international migrant children and differences to respective native populations. Methods Electronic databases PubMed and Web of Science, references of identified publications, and websites of relevant international agencies were searched. We included observational studies published between 2006 and 2016 that reported use of formal health services by migrant children (0–18 years), including first and second generation migrants. Data on study characteristics, study theme, main outcome and study quality were extracted. Results One hundred seven full texts were included in the review. Of the studies that reported comparable outcomes, half (50%) indicated less use of healthcare by migrants compared with non-migrants; 25% reported no difference, 18% reported greater use, and 7% did not report this outcome. There was variation by theme, so that the proportion of conclusions “less use” was most common in the categories “general access to care”, “primary care” and “oral health”, whereas in the use of emergency rooms or hospitalisations, the most common conclusion was “greater use”. Conclusions Migrant children appear to use different types of healthcare services less than native populations, with the exception of emergency and hospital services. Systematic review registration PROSPERO systematic review registration number: CRD42016039876 .
  • Patel, Kishan; Kouvonen, Anne; Close, Ciara; Väänänen, Ari; O’Reilly, Dermot; Donnelly, Michael (BioMed Central, 2017)
    Abstract Background Previous studies investigating the mental health of migrants have shown mixed results. The increased availability of register data has led to a growing number of register-based studies in this research area. This is the first scoping review on the use of registry and record-linkage data to examine the mental health of migrant populations. The aim of this scoping review is to investigate the topics covered and to assess the results yielded from these studies. Methods We used a scoping review methodology to search MedLine, PubMed, PsychINFO, Web of Science, and SCOPUS for all register-based studies on the mental health of migrants. Two reviewers screened all papers, independently, using iteratively applied inclusion and exclusion criteria. Using gradually broadening inclusion and exclusion criteria for maximum “scope,” newly published criteria developed to appraise the methodological quality of record-linkage studies were applied to eligible papers and data were extracted in a charting exercise. Results A total of 1309 papers were screened and appraised, 51 of which met the eligibility and quality criteria and were included in the review. This review identified four major domains of register-based research within the topic of migrant mental health: rates and risks of psychiatric disorders, rates and risks of suicide mortality, the use of psychotropic drugs, and health service utilisation and mental health-related hospitalisation rates. We found that whilst migrants can be at an increased risk of developing psychotic disorders and suicide mortality, they are less likely to use psychotropic medication and mental health-related services. Conclusions This review systematically charts the register-based studies on migrants’ mental health for the first time. It shows the main topics and gaps in knowledge in this research domain, discusses the disadvantages of register-based studies, and suggests new directions for forthcoming studies.