Browsing by Subject "Intersectionality"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-6 of 6
  • Maharani, Cynthia; Moeliono, Moira; Wong, Grace Yee; Brockhaus, Maria; Carmenta, Rachel; Kallio, Maarit Helena (2019)
    Market-driven development is transforming swidden landscapes and having different impacts along intersections of gender, age and class. In Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan, Indonesia, Dayak communities practicing swidden agriculture are making choices on maintaining traditional land use systems, and engaging in rubber, oil palm and conservation (REDD + ) in their livelihood strategies. Although REDD + has been heralded as an alternative to oil palm as a sustainable development option, it is still far from full implementation. Meanwhile, oil palm has become a reality, with large scale plantations that offer job opportunities and produce new sources of prestige, but create contestations around traditional land use systems. We employ the gender asset agriculture project (GAAP) framework and apply an intersectional lens to highlight power relations underlying gendered differences in land, labor and social capital in this process of transformation. Our findings suggest that market interventions produce major changes for men and women, young and old, land cultivators and wage earners. This has created new opportunities for some and new risks for others, with those having power to access diverse types of knowledge, ranging from inheritance rights to market information and job opportunities, best able to exploit such opportunities.
  • Greeman, Tessa (Helsingfors universitet, 2017)
    Children’s picture books play a crucial role in the education and socialisation of the young child, giving them both critical insight into literature, and ideas about life and its possibilities outside of their own immediate experience. In this thesis I have chosen to look more closely at portrayals of so termed ‘non-traditional’ gender identities and behaviours in children’s picture books. I undertook an analysis of 8 books depicting various non-traditional manifestations of gender, covering atypical gendered behaviour, transgender identity or genderlessness along with 6 interviews with educators and parents of children under the age of 7, The thesis explores how these books and ideas fit into an English speaking, European society, in this case based in Finland. The interviewee’s and analysis highlighted areas in which the stories could be problematic within the given context. Issues such as the subject matter, the style and tone were all held to be too controversial for young readers. Looking at the stories through an intersectional lens, they showed little diversity outside of the gender topic. Overall the analysis demonstrated the disconnect between the books and the English speaking, European society in Finland. These findings made it clear that the possibility of children in this context gaining access to stories where gender is not always seen as a finite and binary concept was low. As a final conclusion I created a story of my own. With a protagonist who does not conform to any gender at all, the story was created as the product of the interviews and analysis of the original 8 picture books, with the idea that it could be comfortably read to a class of children within the European, English speaking community in Finland.
  • Keskinen, Suvi Päivikki (2018)
    The rise of neonationalist politics and racist activism has characterised many European countries in recent years. Moreover, there is a growing public focus on gendered and sexualised intimacies. These two tendencies have increasingly intertwined and sexual violence has become a site for struggles over feminist and (anti)racist politics. The article examines what I call the ‘crisis’ of white hegemony arising in the aftermath of the arrival of a large number of refugees in 2015-2016 and the different strategies that women’s and feminist activism has developed. Within white nationalism, there is an upsurge of ‘white border guard femininities’: white women who mobilise on social media and in far-right groups. Simultaneously, antiracist feminist activism has strengthened. It seeks to confront racist discourses of foreign perpetrators and to redirect the discussion by addressing structural aspects of racial and gendered hierarchies and voicing experiences of harassment that are bypassed in the public discussions.
  • Keskinen, Suvi Päivikki (2018)
    The rise of neonationalist politics and racist activism has characterised many European countries in recent years. Moreover, there is a growing public focus on gendered and sexualised intimacies. These two tendencies have increasingly intertwined and sexual violence has become a site for struggles over feminist and (anti)racist politics. The article examines what I call the ‘crisis’ of white hegemony arising in the aftermath of the arrival of a large number of refugees in 2015-2016 and the different strategies that women’s and feminist activism has developed. Within white nationalism, there is an upsurge of ‘white border guard femininities’: white women who mobilise on social media and in far-right groups. Simultaneously, antiracist feminist activism has strengthened. It seeks to confront racist discourses of foreign perpetrators and to redirect the discussion by addressing structural aspects of racial and gendered hierarchies and voicing experiences of harassment that are bypassed in the public discussions.
  • Karjalainen, Ninni (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    This thesis examines the political career, agenda and narratives of Marielle Franco, a former city councillor of Rio de Janeiro. Franco ran for political office the first time in the municipal elections of 2016. Her campaign contained the demands of women and sexual minorities, black people and favela residents. With 46,502 votes, she was the fifth most voted-for council member. The councilwoman was assassinated on March 14, 2018, after leaving an event of black feminist activists. Her death was followed by rallies in several Brazilian cities. Many of the core organisers of these mass mobilisations were black women, and their actions ensured media visibility for the case. In the general elections of 2018, three cabinet members of Marielle Franco were elected to the State Legislative Assembly of Rio de Janeiro (Alerj), defending her political legacy. The primary sources of the thesis comprise of speeches, campaign material, interviews and articles of Marielle Franco as well as public hearings, reports and other records of her term which lasted for fifteen months. The data also includes material produced by black women’s movements following the councilwoman’s assassination. The thesis approaches this material through counter-narrative methodology, which aims to integrate marginalised communities’ voices and perspectives into the research agenda. The aim of the research is to contextualise the political career and agenda of Marielle Franco as a ‘black woman from the favela of Maré’. To that end, the research draws from an intersectional theoretical framework, deploying it as an analytical tool. Intersectionality theorises the relationships between socio-cultural categories and identities. This thesis applies the intracategorical approach, entailing an in-depth study of a particular social group. The analysis focuses on low- income black women. Brazilian black women are disadvantaged by multiple sources of oppression: their race, class and gender. They often work in the informal sector and are disproportionately affected by poverty. Race and gender discrimination prevent them from accessing positions of power. In 2016, the year when Marielle Franco was elected, black women comprised of more than 25% of the population, but represented only 5% of all elected councillors. Their exclusion from political institutions, where decisions concerning their lives are taken, render low-income black women vulnerable to governmental neglect and violations of their and their family members’ fundamental human rights. The election of Marielle Franco was considered as a breakthrough in local politics and seen as an opportunity to change oppressive power structures. The analysis reveals that the councilwoman empowered black women and favela residents to participate party politics in multiple ways. Franco brought their voices, bodies and demands into the institutional domain, and her powerful speeches voiced the concerns of black mothers resisting the state violence within their communities. She also asserted solidarity as part of an alternative political practice of black feminists. Besides being a councillor, Franco was also a scholar and a front- line human rights defender. The analysis also found that Franco’s conception of human rights was based on the praxis developed in the Human Rights Commission of Alerj and centered on the black women of the favelas and urban outskirts. The counter-narratives deployed by Franco emphasised the legacy of feminist movements, including their leaders and symbols. She campaigned for recognising and valuing social differences and fought against all forms of discrimination within political institutions. Her politics and narratives continue to inspire young Brazilian women, particularly black women from the favelas and the urban peripheries.
  • Joseph, Jacquleen; Jauhola, Marjaana; Shanbhogue Arvind , Lavanya; Gadhavi, Shyam (2021)
    In this paper, we suggest that theorising on gendered structural violence and inequalities in disaster recovery would benefit from the in-depth focus on intersections of social relations and processes as they manifest in everyday lives. Drawing from the theorising on neoliberal states, we propose a new theoretical approach of "wounded attachments to disaster recovery". This theoretical position is informed by the lives of three women survivors from three diverse disasters in India. Five perspectives on gendered disaster recovery experience is then presented: firstly, how the recovery beneficiary categories are an extension of the neoliberal subject position; secondly, how recovery reinforces gendered responsibilities as "building oneself back better", a respectable mother and provider; thirdly, how recovery causes pain, suffering, and ressentiment; fourthly, how complex inequalities and social relations are lived through and negotiated in the aftermath of disasters; and finally, how women narrate counter cultural everydayness to disaster recovery in their life histories. We suggest that an understanding of intersectionality, or interlocking systems of oppression, as a form of injury, allows to understand power and structures of disaster recovery. Reiterations of such injuries suggest that instead of reducing vulnerability, and injustice, recovery efforts reiterate these very structures of inequality. The failure to operationalize and capture the complexities of structural inequality and injustice in the context of disaster recovery could be overcome by drawing on the work of scholars who recognise the limits of the concept of intersectionality and engage in alternate conceptualizations, such as pain, suffering, trauma and wounded attachments.