Browsing by Subject "Intestine"

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  • Christensen, Jon; El-Gebali, Sara; Natoli, Manuela; Sengstag, Thierry; Delorenzi, Mauro; Bentz, Susanne; Bouzourene, Hanifa; Rumbo, Martin; Felsani, Armando; Siissalo, Sanna; Hirvonen, Jouni; Vila, Maya R.; Saletti, Piercarlo; Aguet, Michel; Anderle, Pascale (2012)
  • Salmenkari, Hanne; Issakainen, Tomi; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Korpela, Riitta (2015)
    AIM: To investigate local corticosterone production and angiotensin- I converting enzyme (ACE) protein expression and their interaction in healthy and inflamed intestine. METHODS: Acute intestinal inflammation was induced to six weeks old male Balb/c mice by administration of either 3% or 5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 7 d (n = 12 in each group). Healthy controls (n = 12) were given tap water. Corticosterone production and ACE protein shedding were measured from ex vivo incubates of the small and large intestine using EIA and ELISA, respectively. Morphological changes of the intestinal wall were assessed in hematoxylin-eosin stained tissue preparations of jejunum and distal colon. Effects of angiotensin II, captopril and metyrapone on corticosterone production was assessed by incubating pieces of small intestine of healthy mice in the presence of 0.1, 1 or 10 mu mol/L angiotensin II, 1, 10 or 100 mu mol/L captopril or 1, 10 or 100 mu mol/L metyrapone solutions and measuring corticosterone released to the incubation buffer after 90 min (n = 5 in each group). RESULTS: Both concentrations of DSS induced inflammation and morphological changes in large intestines but not in small intestines. Changes were observed as distortions of the crypt structure, mucosal erosion, immune cell infiltration to the mucosa and submucosal edema. Ex vivo corticosterone production (2.9 +/- 1.0 ng/mL vs 2.0 +/- 0.8 ng/mL, P = 0.034) and ACE shedding (269.2 +/- 97.1 ng/mL vs 175.7 +/- 52.2 ng/mL, P = 0.016) were increased in small intestines in 3% DSS group compared to the controls. In large intestine, corticosterone production was increased compared to the controls in both 3% DSS (229 +/- 81 pg/mL vs 158 +/- 30 pg/mL, P = 0.017) and 5% DSS groups (366 +/- 163 pg/mL vs 158 +/- 30 pg/mL, P = 0.002). Large intestine ACE shedding was increased in 5% DSS group (41.5 +/- 9.0 ng/mL vs 20.9 +/- 5.2 ng/mL, P = 0.034). Angiotensin II treatment augmented corticosterone production in small intestine at concentration of 10 mu mol/L (0.97 +/- 0.21 ng/mg protein vs 0.40 +/- 0.09 ng/mg protein, P = 0.036). CONCLUSION: Intestinal ACE shedding is increased by DSS-induced intestinal inflammation and parallels local corticosterone production. ACE product angiotensin. stimulates corticosterone formation in healthy intestine.
  • Vähäkangas, Eliisa (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    The intestinal epithelium is one of the fastest renewing tissues in mammals. Intestinal stem cells (ISC) are responsible for producing all differentiated cell types of the intestinal epithelium, through transit amplifying generations. ISCs reside in the crypt domain of the intestine which are pit like structures located between villi protrusions. The ISCs are interspersed between Paneth cells, which along with cells of the surrounding mesenchyme act as the stem cell niche. ISCs have been reported to divide symmetrically to produce two identical daughter cells. However, the symmetry of these divisions has been concluded based on mathematical modelling which do not account for the possibility that a very small population of ISCs would divide asymmetrically or for qualitative asymmetry occurring in these divisions. Asymmetric cell division is a process by which daughter cells gain different amounts or different qualities of certain factors which lead to their differing fates. Asymmetric division can include asymmetric segregation of organelles such as mitochondria or peroxisomes, which have both been shown to be asymmetrically apportioned in yeast mitosis. Peroxisomes are single membrane enclosed organelles which function in many metabolic processes, most importantly in lipid and reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism. Mitochondria have been reported to be age selectively apportioned during cell division of mammary epithelial stem like cell. The same has been shown to occur for peroxisomes based on unpublished data from my host lab. This prior research of the lab also indicates that selective peroxisomal apportioning would require peroxisomes to be specifically gathered at the centrosomes from metaphase onwards to control their inheritance. In this thesis I will look into peroxisomal dynamics in the intestinal crypt. The first aim is to verify the Lgr5-EGFP-creERT2 x LSL-SNAP-tag-PTS1 mouse model, by checking that the SNAP-tag-PTS1 fusion protein properly localizes to peroxisomes. Secondly, I aim to look into the ages of peroxisomes in ISCs compared to differentiated cells, concentrating on Paneth cells. The third and final aim is to look into the apportioning of old and young peroxisomes during stem cell division. This aim includes looking into the peroxisomal localization at metaphase and checking how peroxisomes are expected to be inherited in later mitotic cells. The SNAP-tag-PTS1 construct adequately co-localizes with the peroxisomal membrane protein 70, also at the old SNAP labelling time point chosen for the following experiments. The SNAP-tag-PTS1 old labelling does not co-localize with the lysosomal associated protein Lamp1 to a high extent, indicating that the peroxisomes with the labelling are not in autolysosomes in amounts that would hamper with the results of the following experiments. There is no noticeable difference between the age contents of peroxisomes in stem cells versus Paneth cells. However, when moving up from base of the crypt to the transit amplifying zone there seems to be an increasing number of peroxisomes, as would be expected based on previous reports of peroxisomes in the intestinal epithelium. At metaphase it seems that approximately half of the cells have a tendency to gather peroxisomes at one centrosome to a higher extent than elsewhere in the cell. Interestingly this condensation was rarely seen at both centrosomes in a given cell. A large heterogeneity was observed when looking into the apportioning of old and young peroxisomes in anaphase or later on in mitosis. A majority of the dividing cells apportioned approximately equal amount of young and old peroxisomes to both daughter cells. Some divisions apportioned inequal amounts of peroxisomes to the daughter cells, with one daughter getting more peroxisomes overall. The daughter cell getting more peroxisomes was more likely to get significantly more of the old label than its pair. This indicates that there could be a small subpopulation of intestinal stem cells that divide their peroxisomes asymmetrically qualitatively as well as quantitatively, however, to definitively conclude this further research is required.
  • Aho, Velma T. E.; Houser, Madelyn C.; Pereira, Pedro A. B.; Chang, Jianjun; Rudi, Knut; Paulin, Lars; Hertzberg, Vicki; Auvinen, Petri; Tansey, Malu G.; Scheperjans, Filip (2021)
    Background Previous studies have reported that gut microbiota, permeability, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and inflammation are altered in Parkinson's disease (PD), but how these factors are linked and how they contribute to disease processes and symptoms remains uncertain. This study sought to compare and identify associations among these factors in PD patients and controls to elucidate their interrelations and links to clinical manifestations of PD. Methods Stool and plasma samples and clinical data were collected from 55 PD patients and 56 controls. Levels of stool SCFAs and stool and plasma inflammatory and permeability markers were compared between patients and controls and related to one another and to the gut microbiota. Results Calprotectin was increased and SCFAs decreased in stool in PD in a sex-dependent manner. Inflammatory markers in plasma and stool were neither intercorrelated nor strongly associated with SCFA levels. Age at PD onset was positively correlated with SCFAs and negatively correlated with CXCL8 and IL-1 beta in stool. Fecal zonulin correlated positively with fecal NGAL and negatively with PD motor and non-motor symptoms. Microbiota diversity and composition were linked to levels of SCFAs, inflammatory factors, and zonulin in stool. Certain relationships differed between patients and controls and by sex. Conclusions Intestinal inflammatory responses and reductions in fecal SCFAs occur in PD, are related to the microbiota and to disease onset, and are not reflected in plasma inflammatory profiles. Some of these relationships are distinct in PD and are sex-dependent. This study revealed potential alterations in microbiota-host interactions and links between earlier PD onset and intestinal inflammatory responses and reduced SCFA levels, highlighting candidate molecules and pathways which may contribute to PD pathogenesis and clinical presentation and which warrant further investigation.
  • Aho, Velma T. E.; Houser, Madelyn C; Pereira, Pedro A B; Chang, Jianjun; Rudi, Knut; Paulin, Lars; Hertzberg, Vicki; Auvinen, Petri; Tansey, Malú G; Scheperjans, Filip (BioMed Central, 2021)
    Abstract Background Previous studies have reported that gut microbiota, permeability, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and inflammation are altered in Parkinson’s disease (PD), but how these factors are linked and how they contribute to disease processes and symptoms remains uncertain. This study sought to compare and identify associations among these factors in PD patients and controls to elucidate their interrelations and links to clinical manifestations of PD. Methods Stool and plasma samples and clinical data were collected from 55 PD patients and 56 controls. Levels of stool SCFAs and stool and plasma inflammatory and permeability markers were compared between patients and controls and related to one another and to the gut microbiota. Results Calprotectin was increased and SCFAs decreased in stool in PD in a sex-dependent manner. Inflammatory markers in plasma and stool were neither intercorrelated nor strongly associated with SCFA levels. Age at PD onset was positively correlated with SCFAs and negatively correlated with CXCL8 and IL-1β in stool. Fecal zonulin correlated positively with fecal NGAL and negatively with PD motor and non-motor symptoms. Microbiota diversity and composition were linked to levels of SCFAs, inflammatory factors, and zonulin in stool. Certain relationships differed between patients and controls and by sex. Conclusions Intestinal inflammatory responses and reductions in fecal SCFAs occur in PD, are related to the microbiota and to disease onset, and are not reflected in plasma inflammatory profiles. Some of these relationships are distinct in PD and are sex-dependent. This study revealed potential alterations in microbiota-host interactions and links between earlier PD onset and intestinal inflammatory responses and reduced SCFA levels, highlighting candidate molecules and pathways which may contribute to PD pathogenesis and clinical presentation and which warrant further investigation.
  • Kolmeder, Carolin A.; de Vos, Willem M. (2021)
    It is known for more than 100 years that the intestinal microbes are important for the host's health and the last decade this is being intensely studied with a focus on the mechanistic aspects. Among the fundamental functions of the intestinal microbiome are the priming of the immune system, the production of essential vitamins and the energy harvest from foods. By now, several dozens of diseases, both intestinal and non-intestinal related, have been associated with the intestinal microbiome. Initially, this was based on the description of the composition between groups of different health status or treatment arms based on phylogenetic approaches based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences. This way of analysis has mostly moved to the analysis of all the genes or transcripts of the microbiome i.e. metagenomics and meta-transcriptomics. Differences are regularly found but these have to be taken with caution as we still do not know what the majority of genes of the intestinal microbiome are capable of doing. To circumvent this caveat researchers are studying the proteins and the metabolites of the microbiome and the host via metaproteomics and metabolomics approaches. However, also here the complexity is high and only a fraction of signals obtained with high throughput instruments can be identified and assigned to a known protein or molecule. Therefore, modern microbiome research needs advancement of existing and development of new analytical techniques. The usage of model systems like intestinal organoids where samples can be taken and processed rapidly as well as microfluidics systems may help. This review aims to elucidate what we know about the functionality of the human intestinal microbiome, what technologies are advancing this knowledge, and what innovations are still required to further evolve this actively developing field. (C) 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Hanifeh, Mohsen; Heilmann, Romy M.; Sankari, Satu; Rajamäki, Minna M.; Mäkitalo, Laura; Syrjä, Pernilla; Kilpinen, Susanne; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Steiner, Jörg M.; Spillmann, Thomas (2015)
    Background: Relatively few laboratory markers have been evaluated for the detection or monitoring of intestinal inflammation in canine chronic enteropathies, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Previous research found that the intestinal mucosal levels of S100A12 and myeloperoxidase (MPO), as biomarkers of gut inflammation, were elevated in human patients with IBD. To date, the S100A12 and MPO levels in intestinal mucosal samples from either healthy dogs or from dogs suffering from IBD remain unreported. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the mucosal S100A12 and MPO levels in four different parts of the intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon) in 12 healthy laboratory Beagle dogs using the ELISA and spectrophotometric methods, respectively. Results: Based on histological examinations, the recorded findings for all the samples were considered normal. The mucosal concentration of S100A12 in the ileum was significantly higher than in all other segments of the intestine (p <0.05). MPO activity was significantly higher in the ileal, jejunal and duodenal than in colonic mucosal samples (p <0.05). Moreover, its concentration was higher in the jejunum than in the duodenum. Conclusions: This study showed that S100A12 and MPO are reliably detectable in canine intestinal mucosa. The assays used appeared to be sufficient to further evaluate the role of S100A12 and MPO in the pathogenesis of canine chronic enteropathies, including IBD. These biomarkers may play a role in the initial detection of gut inflammation suggesting the need for further investigations to confirm IBD or to differentiate between IBD subtypes. Understanding the role of S100A12 and MPO in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation in future may result in an improved understanding of canine chronic intestinal inflammation.
  • Pentinmikko, Nalle; Katajisto, Pekka (2020)
    Like most tissues, intestine shows multiple alterations during aging. While the main function of nutrient absorption is relatively well maintained, capacity of the intestine to respond to abrupt changes or damage declines with age. The reduction in renewal and regeneration capacity results from alterations in the stem cells that renew the epithelium, and in the complex interactions stem cells have with their microenvironment, or the Niche. This review highlights recent evidence on age-associated changes in the intestinal stem cell function, and focuses on stem cell extrinsic mechanisms. Strategies targeting niche interactions have already shown promise in alleviating problems associated with intestinal aging in animal models, and may provide means to protect the elderly for example from chemotherapy induced gastrointestinal side-effects.
  • Penate-Medina, Oula; Tower, Robert J.; Penate-Medina, Tuula; Will, Olga; Saris, Per E. J.; Suojanen, Juho; Sorsa, Timo; Huuskonen, Laura; Hiippala, Kaisa; Satokari, Reetta; Gluer, Claus C.; de Vos, Willem M.; Reunanen, Justus (2019)
    Background: The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract microbiota has been a subject of intense research throughout the 3rd Millennium. Now that a general picture about microbiota composition in health and disease is emerging, questions about factors determining development of microbiotas with specific community structures will be addressed. To this end, usage of murine models for colonization studies remains crucial. Optical in vivo imaging of either bioluminescent or fluorescent bacteria is the basis for non-invasive detection of intestinal colonization of bacteria. Although recent advances in in vivo fluorescence imaging have overcome many limitations encountered in bioluminescent imaging of intestinal bacteria, such as requirement for live cells, high signal attenuation and 2D imaging, the method is still restricted to bacteria for which molecular cloning tools are available. Results: Here, we present usage of a lipophilic fluorescent dye together with Katushka far-red fluorescent protein to establish a dual-color in vivo imaging system to monitor GI transit of different bacterial strains, suitable also for strains resistant to genetic labeling. Using this system, we were able to distinguish two different E. coli strains simultaneously and show their unique transit patterns. Combined with fluorescence molecular tomography, these distinct strains could be spatially and temporally resolved and quantified in 3D. Conclusions: Developed novel method for labeling microbes and identify their passage both temporally and spatially in vivo makes now possible to monitor all culturable bacterial strains, also those that are resistant to conventional genetic labeling.
  • Peñate-Medina, Oula; Tower, Robert J; Peñate-Medina, Tuula; Will, Olga; Saris, Per E. J.; Suojanen, Juho; Sorsa, Timo; Huuskonen, Laura; Hiippala, Kaisa; Satokari, Reetta; Glüer, Claus C; de Vos, Willem M.; Reunanen, Justus (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract microbiota has been a subject of intense research throughout the 3rd Millennium. Now that a general picture about microbiota composition in health and disease is emerging, questions about factors determining development of microbiotas with specific community structures will be addressed. To this end, usage of murine models for colonization studies remains crucial. Optical in vivo imaging of either bioluminescent or fluorescent bacteria is the basis for non-invasive detection of intestinal colonization of bacteria. Although recent advances in in vivo fluorescence imaging have overcome many limitations encountered in bioluminescent imaging of intestinal bacteria, such as requirement for live cells, high signal attenuation and 2D imaging, the method is still restricted to bacteria for which molecular cloning tools are available. Results Here, we present usage of a lipophilic fluorescent dye together with Katushka far-red fluorescent protein to establish a dual-color in vivo imaging system to monitor GI transit of different bacterial strains, suitable also for strains resistant to genetic labeling. Using this system, we were able to distinguish two different E. coli strains simultaneously and show their unique transit patterns. Combined with fluorescence molecular tomography, these distinct strains could be spatially and temporally resolved and quantified in 3D. Conclusions Developed novel method for labeling microbes and identify their passage both temporally and spatially in vivo makes now possible to monitor all culturable bacterial strains, also those that are resistant to conventional genetic labeling.