Browsing by Subject "Intimacy."

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-2 of 2
  • Konnaris, Petros (2017)
    Nakedness can mean not wearing any clothes but it could also mean not having your socks on. I see nakedness as a social construct that can shift meanings depending on the context, the culture and the subject(s) being or not being naked. In Approaching Nakedness and Its Problematics I use personal experiences I had in Europe and Thailand, the words Naked, Nude and Τίτσιρος (:Titsiros), borrow ideas from Donna Haraway, the trans philosopher Talia Mae Bettcher, and the indigenous scholar Irene Watson to introduce the multiplicity of nakedness. I present some of the problematics of nakedness such as objectification, male gaze, exhibitionism and voyeurism, toxic masculinity, gender binaries, and normalized body images. Afterward, I present queer and feminist theories of Judith Butler, Diane Ponterotto, and Talia Mae Bettcher on how to resist those problematics. I then contextualize my work in relation to other artists, their work and the mentioned problematics. I continue with my artistic project A Bathing Performance, a 1-1(one with one) happening of nakedness and care, presenting my methodology, my aims, my reflections and observation. In the project, I limit the spectrum of nakedness and focus on nakedness as an intimate, platonic act. Additionally, I introduce the term one with one and explore performance as a meeting, a mutual, interconnected exchange with another person. I approach both nakedness and the performance as a multiplicity, a range of options and choices that one can decide how, when and where he/she/they want to experience nakedness. The written part of my thesis includes an academic text and a handwritten book: a replica of the scorebook I used in the performances in June 2017 which includes the updated version of my 30 bathing scores/proposals.
  • Convertito, Giorgio (2020)
    In this thesis I look at some of the ethical issues involved in one-to-one practices, observing how they offer a uniquely compress example of dialogical, experiential and transformative pedagogy, providing the most obvious representation of the meeting with the Other and with the otherness within oneself. I look in particular at the idea of ‘perceived obligation’, the way we respond to a situation as we think we are expected to by an authority figure. Another crucial concept of this research is that of safe space / brave space, a space where risks are acceptable and even welcome, and where a transformative experience can take place. I use Van Manen, Antila and Arao&Clemens to advocate that a safe space cannot be just a container for rules and that there are no universal procedures that can guarantee safety, suggesting instead a dialogical approach. The proposal is that a caring approach to ethics, combined with the integrity, insight, generosity and sensitivity of the practitioner, and a mutual interest and respect for the material, are the ingredients that create a safe environment for learning through transformation. I use my artistic project “Hotel Room Encounters” as a laboratory where the issues mentioned above can be observed and studied. Most of this research is based on observing my own personal experience, but also on comments made by the participants during the encounters as well as in the notes they wrote and left to me after the encounter. The project aims to create a situation favourable to the meeting with the unknown and to a transformative experience. In accordance with Rancière’s and Biesta’s idea that in order to learn and grow, one has to move out of one’s comfort zone, I tried to create the conditions for a safe discomfort and for a gentle push of boundaries; a move into the risk zone designed to set the conditions for an unusual experience and potential for learning something about oneself. I also look at the “Hotel Room Encounter” as improvisational and somatic practice, using my experience in such practices to guide me through the experience of meeting the unknown, especially within the format of one-to-one participatory performance, with what I had no previous experience as a practitioner. I also briefly link this work to my experience of somatic practices and eventually reflect on my positioning as a middle-aged white man in society.