Browsing by Subject "LAND-USE INTENSITY"

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  • Abdi, Abdulhakim; Carrié, Romain; Sidemo-Holm, William; Cai, Zhanzhang; Boke Olén, Niklas; Smith, Henrik G; Eklundh, Lars; Ekroos, Johan Edvard (2021)
    Increasing land-use intensity is a main driver of biodiversity loss in farmland, but measuring proxies for land-use intensity across entire landscapes is challenging. Here, we develop a novel method for the assessment of the impact of land-use intensity on biodiversity in agricultural landscapes using remote sensing parameters derived from the Sentinel-2 satellites. We link crop phenology and productivity parameters derived from time-series of a two-band enhanced vegetation index with biodiversity indicators (insect pollinators and insect-pollinated vascular plants) in agricultural fields in southern Sweden, with contrasting land management (i.e. conventional and organic farming). Our results show that arable land-use intensity in cereal systems dominated by spring-sown cereals can be approximated using Sentinel-2 productivity parameters. This was shown by the significant positive correlations between the amplitude and maximum value of the enhanced vegetation index on one side and farmer reported yields on the other. We also found that conventional cereal fields had 17% higher maximum and 13% higher amplitude of their enhanced vegetation index than organic fields. Sentinel-2 derived parameters were more strongly correlated with the abundance and species richness of bumblebees and the richness of vascular plants than the abundance and species richness of butterflies. The relationships we found between biodiversity and crop production proxies are consistent with predictions that increasing agricultural land-use intensity decreases field biodiversity. The newly developed method based on crop phenology and productivity parameters derived from Sentinel-2 data serves as a proof of concept for the assessment of the impact of land-use intensity on biodiversity over cereal fields across larger areas. It enables the estimation of arable productivity in cereal systems, which can then be used by ecologists and develop tools for land managers as a proxy for land-use intensity. Coupled with spatially explicit databases on agricultural land-use, this method will enable crop-specific cereal productivity estimation across large geographical regions.
  • Sutcliffe, Laura M. E.; Batary, Peter; Kormann, Urs; Baldi, Andras; Dicks, Lynn V.; Herzon, Irina; Kleijn, David; Tryjanowski, Piotr; Apostolova, Iva; Arlettaz, Raphael; Aunins, Ainars; Aviron, Stephanie; Balezentiene, Ligita; Fischer, Christina; Halada, Lubos; Hartel, Tibor; Helm, Aveliina; Hristov, Iordan; Jelaska, Sven D.; Kaligaric, Mitja; Kamp, Johannes; Klimek, Sebastian; Koorberg, Pille; Kostiukova, Jarmila; Kovacs-Hostyanszki, Aniko; Kuemmerle, Tobias; Leuschner, Christoph; Lindborg, Regina; Loos, Jacqueline; Maccherini, Simona; Marja, Riho; Mathe, Orsolya; Paulini, Inge; Proenca, Vania; Rey-Benayas, Jose; Sans, F. Xavier; Seifert, Charlotte; Stalenga, Jaroslaw; Timaeus, Johannes; Toeroek, Peter; van Swaay, Chris; Viik, Eneli; Tscharntke, Teja (2015)
    A large proportion of European biodiversity today depends on habitat provided by low-intensity farming practices, yet this resource is declining as European agriculture intensifies. Within the European Union, particularly the central and eastern new member states have retained relatively large areas of species-rich farmland, but despite increased investment in nature conservation here in recent years, farmland biodiversity trends appear to be worsening. Although the high biodiversity value of Central and Eastern European farmland has long been reported, the amount of research in the international literature focused on farmland biodiversity in this region remains comparatively tiny, and measures within the EU Common Agricultural Policy are relatively poorly adapted to support it. In this opinion study, we argue that, 10years after the accession of the first eastern EU new member states, the continued under-representation of the low-intensity farmland in Central and Eastern Europe in the international literature and EU policy is impeding the development of sound, evidence-based conservation interventions. The biodiversity benefits for Europe of existing low-intensity farmland, particularly in the central and eastern states, should be harnessed before they are lost. Instead of waiting for species-rich farmland to further decline, targeted research and monitoring to create locally appropriate conservation strategies for these habitats is needed now.