Browsing by Subject "LARGE IGNEOUS PROVINCE"

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  • Rasmussen, Christian M. Ø.; Kröger, Björn; Nielsen, Morten L.; Colmenar, Jorge (2019)
    The greatest relative changes in marine biodiversity accumulation occurred during the Early Paleozoic. The precision of temporal constraints on these changes is crude, hampering our understanding of their timing, duration, and links to causal mechanisms. We match fossil occurrence data to their lithostratigraphical ranges in the Paleobiology Database and correlate this inferred taxon range to a constructed set of biostratigraphically defined high-resolution time slices. In addition, we apply capture-recapture modeling approaches to calculate a biodiversity curve that also considers taphonomy and sampling biases with four times better resolution of previous estimates. Our method reveals a stepwise biodiversity increase with distinct Cambrian and Ordovician radiation events that are clearly separated by a 50-million-year-long period of slow biodiversity accumulation. The Ordovician Radiation is confined to a 15-million-year phase after which the Late Ordovician extinctions lowered generic richness and further delayed a biodiversity rebound by at least 35 million years. Based on a first-differences approach on potential abiotic drivers controlling richness, we find an overall correlation with oxygen levels, with temperature also exhibiting a coordinated trend once equatorial sea surface temperatures fell to present-day levels during the Middle Ordovician Darriwilian Age. Contrary to the traditional view of the Late Ordovician extinctions, our study suggests a protracted crisis interval linked to intense volcanism during the middle Late Ordovician Katian Age. As richness levels did not return to prior levels during the Silurian-a time of continental amalgamation-we further argue that plate tectonics exerted an overarching control on biodiversity accumulation.
  • Heinonen, Jussi S.; Jennings, Eleanor S.; Riley, Teal R. (2015)
    Calculating reliable temperatures of Mg-rich magmas is problematic because melt composition and KD(Fe-Mg)ol-liq, the key parameters of many traditional thermometers, are difficult to constrain precisely. The recently developed Al-in-olivine thermometer [Coogan, L.A., Saunders, A.D., Wilson, R.N., 2014. Aluminum-in-olivine thermometry of primitive basalts: Evidence of an anomalously hot mantle source for large igneous provinces. Chemical Geology 368, 1–10] circumvents these problems by relying on the temperature-dependent exchange of Al between olivine and spinel crystallising in equilibrium with each other. This thermometer is used to re-evaluate the crystallisation temperatures of the most Mg-rich magma type identified from the Karoo large igneous province (LIP), known as the Vestfjella depleted ferropicrite suite. Previous temperature estimates for the suite were based on olivine-melt equilibria and indicated anomalously high crystallisation temperatures in excess of 1600 °C. We also present crystallisation temperatures for another Antarctic Karoo magma type, Group 3 dykes from Ahlmannryggen, which are derived from a pyroxene-rich mantle source. Our high-precision analysis of Al in olivine-spinel pairs indicate crystallisation temperatures from 1391±42 °C to 1481±35 °C for the Vestfjella depleted ferropicrite suite (Fo88–92) and from 1253±64 °C to 1303±40 °C for the Group 3 dykes (Fo79–82). Although the maximum temperature estimates for the former are over 100 °C lower than the previously presented estimates, they are still ~200 °C higher than those calculated for mid-ocean ridge basalts using the same method. Although exact mantle potential temperatures are difficult to estimate, the presented results support elevated sub-Gondwanan upper mantle temperatures (generated by a mantle plume or internal mantle heating) during the generation of the Karoo LIP.
  • Heinonen, Jussi S.; Luttinen, Arto V.; Spera, Frank J.; Bohrson, Wendy A. (2019)
    Karoo continental flood basalt (CFB) province is known for its highly variable trace element and isotopic composition, often attributed to the involvement of continental lithospheric sources. Here, we report oxygen isotopic compositions measured with secondary ion mass spectrometry for hand-picked olivine phenocrysts from similar to 190 to 180 Ma CFBs and intrusive rocks from Vestfjella, western Dronning Maud Land, that form an Antarctic extension of the Karoo province. The Vestfjella lavas exhibit heterogeneous trace element and radiogenic isotope compositions (e.g., epsilon(Nd) from -16 to +2 at 180 Ma) and the involvement of continental lithospheric mantle and/or crust in their petrogenesis has previously been suggested. Importantly, our sample set also includes rare primitive dikes that have been derived from depleted asthenospheric mantle sources (epsilon(Nd) up to + 8 at 180 Ma). The majority of the oxygen isotopic compositions of the olivines from these dike rocks (delta O-18 = 4.4-5.2%; Fo = 78-92 mol%) are also compatible with such sources. The olivine phenocrysts in the lavas, however, are characterized by notably higher delta O-18 (6.2-7.5%; Fo = 70-88 mol%); and one of the dike samples gives intermediate compositions (5.2-6.1%, Fo = 83-87 mol%) between the other dikes and the CFBs. The oxygen isotopic compositions do not correlate with radiogenic isotope compositions susceptible to crustal assimilation (Sr, Nd, and Pb) or with geochemical indicators of pyroxene-rich mantle sources. Instead, delta O-18 correlates positively with enrichments in large-ion lithophile elements (especially K) and Os-187. We suggest that the oxygen isotopic compositions of the Vestfjella CFB olivines primarily record large-scale subduction-related metasomatism of the sub-Gondwanan mantle (base of the lithosphere or deeper) prior to Karoo magmatism. The overall influence of such sources to Karoo magmatism is not known, but, in addition to continental lithosphere, they may be responsible for some of the geochemical heterogeneity observed in the CFBs.
  • Heinonen, Jussi S.; Luttinen, Arto V.; Whitehouse, M.J. (2018)
    Karoo continental flood basalt (CFB) province is known for its highly variable trace element and isotopic composition, often attributed to the involvement of continental lithospheric sources. Here, we report oxygen isotopic compositions measured with secondary ion mass spectrometry for hand-picked olivine phenocrysts from similar to 190 to 180 Ma CFBs and intrusive rocks from Vestfjella, western Dronning Maud Land, that form an Antarctic extension of the Karoo province. The Vestfjella lavas exhibit heterogeneous trace element and radiogenic isotope compositions (e.g., epsilon(Nd) from -16 to +2 at 180 Ma) and the involvement of continental lithospheric mantle and/or crust in their petrogenesis has previously been suggested. Importantly, our sample set also includes rare primitive dikes that have been derived from depleted asthenospheric mantle sources (epsilon(Nd) up to + 8 at 180 Ma). The majority of the oxygen isotopic compositions of the olivines from these dike rocks (delta O-18 = 4.4-5.2%; Fo = 78-92 mol%) are also compatible with such sources. The olivine phenocrysts in the lavas, however, are characterized by notably higher delta O-18 (6.2-7.5%; Fo = 70-88 mol%); and one of the dike samples gives intermediate compositions (5.2-6.1%, Fo = 83-87 mol%) between the other dikes and the CFBs. The oxygen isotopic compositions do not correlate with radiogenic isotope compositions susceptible to crustal assimilation (Sr, Nd, and Pb) or with geochemical indicators of pyroxene-rich mantle sources. Instead, delta O-18 correlates positively with enrichments in large-ion lithophile elements (especially K) and Os-187. We suggest that the oxygen isotopic compositions of the Vestfjella CFB olivines primarily record large-scale subduction-related metasomatism of the sub-Gondwanan mantle (base of the lithosphere or deeper) prior to Karoo magmatism. The overall influence of such sources to Karoo magmatism is not known, but, in addition to continental lithosphere, they may be responsible for some of the geochemical heterogeneity observed in the CFBs.
  • Heinonen, Jussi S.; Fusswinkel, Tobias (2017)
    Nickel contents and Mn/Fe in olivine phenocrysts have been suggested to reflect the mineral composition of the mantle source of the host magma. This hypothesis is tested here against a well-characterized suite of meimechitic (or Ti-rich komatiitic) dikes from the Antarctic extension of the Jurassic ~180 Ma Karoo large igneous province. The presented trace element data on Fo82–92 olivines show relatively high Ni (2430–3570 ppm) and low 100*Mn/Fe (1.32–1.5; Mn = 890–1570 ppm), compatible with pyroxenite-rich sources (Xpx = 37–75%). Many other mantle source indicators (parental melt MgO and whole-rock Zn/Fe, MgO/CaO, FC3MS, Zr/Y vs. Nb/Y, and radiogenic isotope compositions) suggest dominantly or solely peridotitic mantle sources, however. Therefore, the measured high Ni and low Mn/Fe are likely to reflect high temperatures and pressures of melting and possibly high water contents in such peridotite sources. We recommend considerable caution when using Ni and Mn contents of olivine as source indicators, as they may only serve for qualitative comparison of primitive volcanic rocks that originated under fairly similar mantle conditions.
  • Turunen, Sanni T.; Luttinen, Arto V.; Heinonen, Jussi S.; Jamal, Daúd L. (2019)
    We present geochemical and isotopic (Nd, Sr) data for a picrite lava suite from the Luenha River and adjacent areas in Mozambique. The Luenha picrites represent a previously unknown type of picrites related to the Karoo large igneous province (LIP) and are distinguished by their notably low TiO2 contents (0.3-1.0 wt%) and coupling of high Nb/Y with low Zr/Y and Sm/Yb. Relatively high CaO and low Zn/Fe point to a peridotitic mantle source. Contamination-sensitive incompatible element ratios show that one lava flow is likely to be uncontaminated by the crust and its composition suggests a mantle source with primitive mantle-like incompatible element ratios and mildly depleted isotopic ratios (initial Sr-87/Sr-86 = 0.7041 and epsilon(Nd) = +1.4 at 180 Ma). The primary melts of the Luenha picrites had MgO contents in the range of 13-21 wt%. Our preferred estimate for a primary melt composition (MgO = 18 wt%) resembles experimental melts of fertile mantle peridotite at 3-4 GPa and indicates liquidus temperature of 1445-1582 degrees C. Geochemical similarities suggest the Luenha picrites were generated from the same overall primitive mantle-like reservoir that produced the main volume of Karoo flood basalts in the Karoo, Kalahari, and Zambezi basins, whereas the previously identified enriched and depleted (upper) mantle sources of Karoo picrite suites (Mwenezi, Antarctica) were subordinate sources for flood basalts. We propose that the Luenha picrites record melting of a hot, chemically primitive mantle plume source that may have been rooted in the sub-African large low shear velocity province boundary and that such a source might have been the most significant magma source in the Karoo LIP. (C) 2019 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Heinonen, Jussi S.; Luttinen, Arto V.; Riley, Teal R.; Michallik, Radoslaw M. (2013)
    Primitive rocks that are related to continental flood basalts are rare, but often reveal crucial information on the ultimate sources of these huge outpourings of mantle-derived magma. Here we present mineral chemical data for mafic and ultramafic dikes from the Antarctic extension of the Jurassic (~180 Ma) Karoo continental flood basalt province that was emplaced during the initial stages of the breakup of the Gondwana supercontinent. We concentrate on two previously recognized high-Ti dike rock suites (Group 3 and Group 4) that exhibit high MgO contents (up to 22 wt. %). Both groups are characterized by Mg-rich olivine phenocrysts (up to Fo90) that are not mantle xenocrysts and indicate derivation from relatively Mg-rich parental magmas. Orthopyroxene is a common phenocryst and groundmass phase indicating emplacement at mid-crustal pressures (2–5 kbar; depth of ~10–20 km). The parental magmas of Group 3 and Group 4 dikes can be associated with pyroxenite sources on the basis of high olivine NiO, high whole-rock Zn/Fe, and low whole-rock CaO. In the case of Group 3 dikes, however, the samples that contain the most Mg-rich olivine also exhibit the mildest pyroxenite fingerprint and indications of an additional olivine-bearing (peridotitic) source component. We propose that the pyroxenite fingerprint of Group 3 and Group 4 dikes reflects relatively low-degree melting of fertile mantle at high pressures beneath the thick and cold Gondwanan lithosphere. Such conditions limited high-degree melting of peridotite sources which may have been predominant in the generation of the Karoo low-Ti basalts within lithospheric thinning zones.
  • Gong, Zheng; Evans, David A. D.; Elming, Sten-Åke; Söderlund, Ulf; Salminen, Johanna M. (2018)
  • Heinonen, Jussi S.; Carlson, Rick W.; Riley, Teal R.; Luttinen, Arto V.; Horan, Mary F. (2014)
    The great majority of continental flood basalts (CFBs) have a marked lithospheric geochemical signature, suggesting derivation from the continental lithosphere, or contamination by it. Here we present new Pb and Os isotopic data and review previously published major element, trace element, mineral chemical, and Sr and Nd isotopic data for geochemically unusual mafic and ultramafic dikes located in the Antarctic segment (Ahlmannryggen, western Dronning Maud Land) of the Karoo CFB province. Some of the dikes show evidence of minor contamination with continental crust, but the least contaminated dikes exhibit depleted mantle –like initial εNd (+9) and 187Os/188Os (0.1244–0.1251) at 180 Ma. In contrast, their initial Sr and Pb isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7035–0.7062, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.2–18.4, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.49–15.52, 208Pb/204Pb = 37.7–37.9 at 180 Ma) are more enriched than expected for depleted mantle, and the major element and mineral chemical evidence indicate contribution from (recycled) pyroxenite sources. Our Sr, Nd, Pb, and Os isotopic and trace element modeling indicate mixed peridotite-pyroxenite sources that contain ~10–30 % of seawater-altered and subduction-modified MORB with a recycling age of less than 1.0 Ga entrained in a depleted Os-rich peridotite matrix. Such a source would explain the unusual combination of elevated initial 87Sr/86Sr and Pb isotopic ratios and relative depletion in LILE, U, Th, Pb and LREE, high initial εNd, and low initial 187Os/188Os. Although the sources of the dikes probably did not play a major part in the generation of the Karoo CFBs in general, different kind of recycled source components (e.g., sediment-influenced) would be more difficult to distinguish from lithospheric CFB geochemical signatures. In addition to underlying continental lithosphere, the involvement of recycled sources in causing the apparent lithospheric geochemical affinity of CFBs should thus be carefully assessed in every case.