Browsing by Subject "LATE SEIZURES"

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  • Lahti, Anna-Maija; Huhtakangas, Juha; Juvela, Seppo; Bode, Michaela K.; Tetri, Sami (2021)
    Objectives: This study aimed to determine whether post-stroke epilepsy (PSE) predicts mortality, and to describe the most prominent causes of death (COD) in a long-term follow-up after primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: We followed 3-month survivors of a population-based cohort of primary ICH patients in Northern Ostrobothnia, Finland, for a median of 8.8 years. Mortality and CODs were compared between those who developed PSE and those who did not. PSE was defined according to the ILAE guidelines. CODs were extracted from death certificates (Statistics Finland). Results: Of 961 patients, 611 survived for 3 months. 409 (66.9%) had died by the end of the follow-up. Pneumonia was the only COD that was significantly more common among the patients with PSE (56% vs. 37% of deaths). In the multivariable models, PSE (hazard ratio [HR] 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06 & ndash;1.87), age (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.06 & ndash;1.08), male sex (HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.09 & ndash;1.67), dependency at 3 months (HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.24 & ndash;1.88), non-subcortical ICH location (subcortical location HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.61-0.99), diabetes (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.07 & ndash;1.90) and cancer (HR 1.45, 95% CI 1.06 & ndash;1.98) predicted death in the long-term follow-up. Conclusion: PSE independently predicted higher late morality of ICH in our cohort. Pneumonia-related deaths were more common among the patients with PSE.
  • Räty, Silja; Sallinen, Hanne; Virtanen, Pekka; Haapaniemi, Elena; Wu, Teddy Y.; Putaala, Jukka; Meretoja, Atte; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Strbian, Daniel (2021)
    Objectives Posterior location affects the clinical presentation and outcome of ischemic stroke, but little is known about occipital intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We studied non-traumatic occipital ICH phenotype, outcome, and post-ICH epilepsy. Materials and Methods Occipital ICH patients were retrospectively identified from the Helsinki ICH Study registry of 1013 consecutive ICH patients treated in our tertiary center in 2005-2010. They were compared to non-occipital ICH patients to evaluate the effect of location on functional outcome at discharge (dichotomized modified Rankin Scale, mRS), 3- and 12-month mortality, and incidence of epilepsy. Results We found 19 occipital ICH patients (5.3% of lobar and 1.9% of all ICH). Compared to non-occipital lobar ICHs, they were younger (median age 63 vs 71 years,P= .007) and had lower National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale on admission (1 vs 8,P<.001), smaller hematoma volume (6.3 vs 17.7 ML,P= .008), and more frequently structural etiology underlying the ICH (26% vs 7%,P= .01). Mortality at both 3 and 12 months was 6%, whereas 84% reached favorable outcome (mRS 0-2) at discharge. Occipital location was associated with favorable outcome at discharge in lobar ICH (OR 11.02, 95% CI 1.55-78.20). Incidence of post-ICH epilepsy (median follow-up 2.7 years) was 18%, equaling to that of non-occipital lobar ICH. Conclusions Occipital ICH patients are younger, have less severe clinical presentation, smaller hematoma volume, more often structural etiology, and better outcome than other ICH patients. They exhibit a similar risk of epilepsy as non-occipital ICHs.