Browsing by Subject "LEUKOSTASIS"

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  • Simonsen, Johan Rasmus; Järvinen, Asko; Hietala, Kustaa; Harjutsalo, Valma; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Lehto, Markku (2021)
    Background/Aims Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is associated and shares many risk factors with other diabetic complications, including inflammation. Bacterial infections, potent inducers of inflammation have been associated with the development of diabetic complications apart from DR. Our aim was to investigate the association between bacterial infections and DR. Methods Adult individuals with type 1 diabetes (n=1043) were recruited from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study (FinnDiane), a prospective follow-up study. DR was defined as incident severe diabetic retinopathy (SDR), identified as first laser treatment. Data on DR were obtained through fundus photographs and medical records, data on bacterial infections from comprehensive national registries (1 January 1995 to 31 December 2015). Risk factors for DR and serum bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activity were determined at baseline. Results Individuals with incident SDR (n=413) had a higher mean number of antibiotic purchases/follow-up year compared with individuals without incident SDR (n=630) (0.92 [95% CI 0.82 to 1.02] vs 0.67 [0.62-0.73], p=0.02), as well as higher levels of LPS activity (0.61 [0.58-0.65] vs 0.56 [0.54-0.59] EU/mL, p=0.03). Individuals with on average >= 1 purchase per follow-up year (n=269) had 1.5 times higher cumulative incidence of SDR, compared with individuals with
  • Canaani, Jonathan; Labopin, Myriam; Socie, Gerard; Nihtinen, Anne; Huynh, Anne; Cornelissen, Jan; Deconinck, Eric; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Forcade, Edouard; Chevallier, Patrice; Bourhis, Jean H.; Blaise, Didier; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon (2017)
    Up to 20% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients present initially with hyperleukocytosis, placing them at increased risk for early mortality during induction. Yet, it is unknown whether hyperleukocytosis still retains prognostic value for AML patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Furthermore, it is unknown whether hyperleukocytosis holds prognostic significance when modern molecular markers such as FLT3-ITD and NPM1 are accounted for. To determine whether hyperleukocytosis is an independent prognostic factor influencing outcome in transplanted AML patients we performed a retrospective analysis using the registry of the acute leukemia working party of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. A cohort of 357 patients with hyperleukocytosis (159 patients with white blood count [WBC] 50 K-100 K, 198 patients with WBC >= 100 K) was compared to 918 patients without hyperleukocytosis. Patients with hyperleukocytosis were younger, had an increased rate of favorable risk cytogenetics, and more likely to be FLT3 and NPM1 mutated. In multivariate analysis, hyperleukocytosis was independently associated with increased relapse incidence (hazard ratio [HR] of 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-2.12; P = .004), decreased leukemia-free survival (HR of 1.38, 95% CI, 1.07-1.78; P = .013), and inferior overall survival (HR of 1.4, 95% CI, 1.07-1.84; P = .013). Hyperleukocytosis retains a significant prognostic role for AML patients undergoing HSCT.