Browsing by Subject "LIFE-STYLE"

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  • Eriksson, Mia D.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Kautiainen, Hannu; Salonen, Minna K.; Mikkola, Tuija M.; Kajantie, Eero; Wasenius, Niko; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela; Laine, Merja K. (2021)
    Background: Millions of people live with depression and its burden of disease. Depression has an increased comorbidity and mortality that has remained unexplained. Studies have reported connections between advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and various disease processes, including mental health. The present study evaluated associations between AGEs, depressive symptoms, and types of depressive symptoms. Methods: From the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, 815 participants with a mean age of 76 years were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Characteristics regarding self-reported lifestyle and medical history, as well as blood tests were obtained along with responses regarding depressive symptoms according to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Mental Health Inventory-5. Each participant had their AGE level measured non-invasively with skin autofluorescence (SAF). Statistical analyses looked at relationships between types of depressive symptoms and AGE levels by sex. Results: Of women, 27% scored >= 10 on the BDI and 18% of men, respectively. Men had higher crude AGE levels (mean [standard deviation], arbitrary units) (2.49 [0.51]) compared to women (2.33 [0.46]) (p < 0.001). The highest crude AGE levels were found in those with melancholic depressive symptoms (2.61 [0.57]), followed by those with non-melancholic depressive symptoms (2.45 [0.45]) and those with no depressive symptoms (2.38 [0.49]) (p = 0.013). These findings remained significant in the fully adjusted model. Conclusions: The current study shows an association between depressive symptoms and higher AGE levels. The association is likely part of a multi-factorial effect, and hence no directionality, causality, or effect can be inferred solely based on the results of this study.
  • Ricci, Cristian; Wood, Angela; Muller, David; Gunter, Marc J.; Agudo, Antonio; Boeing, Heiner; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Warnakula, Samantha; Saieva, Calogero; Spijkerman, Annemieke; Sluijs, Ivonne; Tjonneland, Anne; Kyro, Cecilie; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Kuehn, Tilman; Kaaks, Rudolf; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Panico, Salvatore; Agnoli, Claudia; Palli, Domenico; Tumino, Rosario; Engstrom, Gunnar; Melander, Olle; Bonnet, Fabrice; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Key, Timothy J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Overvad, Kim; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Quiros, J. Ramon; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Papatesta, Eleni-Maria; Peppa, Eleni; Iribas, Conchi Moreno; Gavrila, Diana; Forslund, Ann-Sofie; Jansson, Jan-Hakan; Matullo, Giuseppe; Arriola, Larraitz; Freisling, Heinz; Lassale, Camille; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Sharp, Stephen J.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Langenberg, Claudia; Saracci, Rodolfo; Sweeting, Michael; Brennan, Paul; Butterworth, Adam S.; Riboli, Elio (2018)
    OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between alcohol consumption (at baseline and over lifetime) and non-fatal and fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. DESIGN Multicentre case-cohort study. SETTING A study of cardiovascular disease (CVD) determinants within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition cohort (EPIC-CVD) from eight European countries. PARTICIPANTS 32 549 participants without baseline CVD, comprised of incident CVD cases and a subcohort for comparison. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Non-fatal and fatal CHD and stroke (including ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke). RESULTS There were 9307 non-fatal CHD events, 1699 fatal CHD, 5855 non-fatal stroke, and 733 fatal stroke. Baseline alcohol intake was inversely associated with non-fatal CHD, with a hazard ratio of 0.94 (95% confidence interval 0.92 to 0.96) per 12 g/day higher intake. There was a J shaped association between baseline alcohol intake and risk of fatal CHD. The hazard ratios were 0.83 (0.70 to 0.98), 0.65 (0.53 to 0.81), and 0.82 (0.65 to 1.03) for categories 5.0-14.9 g/day, 15.0-29.9 g/day, and 30.0-59.9 g/day of total alcohol intake, respectively, compared with 0.1-4.9 g/ day. In contrast, hazard ratios for non-fatal and fatal stroke risk were 1.04 (1.02 to 1.07), and 1.05 (0.98 to 1.13) per 12 g/day increase in baseline alcohol intake, respectively, including broadly similar findings for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. Associations with cardiovascular outcomes were broadly similar with average lifetime alcohol consumption as for baseline alcohol intake, and across the eight countries studied. There was no strong evidence for interactions of alcohol consumption with smoking status on the risk of CVD events. CONCLUSIONS Alcohol intake was inversely associated with non-fatal CHD risk but positively associated with the risk of different stroke subtypes. This highlights the opposing associations of alcohol intake with different CVD types and strengthens the evidence for policies to reduce alcohol consumption.
  • Piirtola, Maarit; Kaprio, Jaakko; Silventoinen, Karri; Svedberg, Pia; Korhonen, Tellervo; Ropponen, Annina (2017)
    To investigate longitudinal associations of smoking and a change in smoking status with leisure-time physical inactivity. In addition, to control whether familial confounding (genetics and shared environment) influences the associations. Data were based on the population-based Finnish Adult Twin Cohort of 5254 twin individuals born in 1945-1957 (41% men) and who participated in all four surveys over a 35-year follow-up (1975-2011). Logistic and conditional logistic regression models with multiple covariates were used for analyses. Compared to never-smokers, long-term daily smokers (1975-1990) had the highest likelihood for both long-term inactivity and to change into inactive by 2011. Recurrent smoking was associated with long-term inactivity. Instead, in comparison to persistent daily smokers, quitting smoking decreased the likelihood of becoming physically inactive at leisure time. The associations remained in the analyses which accounted for multiple covariates and/or familial confounding. Daily smoking increases the likelihood of remaining or becoming physically inactive over the decades. Our results emphasize not only the importance of preventing smoking initiation, but also to support early smoking cessation in promotion of lifelong physical activity.
  • Lehtisalo, J.; Lindstrom, J.; Ngandu, T.; Kivipelto, M.; Ahtiluoto, S.; Ilanne-Parikka, P.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, S.; Eriksson, J. G.; Uusitupa, M.; Tuomilehto, J.; Luchsinger, J.; Finnish Diabet Prevention Study DP (2016)
    Objectives: To investigate associations of long-term nutrient intake, physical activity and obesity with later cognitive function among the participants in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, in which a lifestyle intervention was successful in diabetes prevention. Design: An active lifestyle intervention phase during middle age (mean duration 4 years) and extended follow-up (additional 9 years) with annual lifestyle measurements, followed by an ancillary cognition assessment. Setting: 5 research centers in Finland. Participants: Of the 522 middle-aged, overweight participants with impaired glucose tolerance recruited to the study, 364 (70%) participated in the cognition assessment (mean age 68 years). Measurements: A cognitive assessment was executed with the CERAD test battery and the Trail Making Test A on average 13 years after baseline. Lifestyle measurements included annual clinical measurements, food records, and exercise questionnaires during both the intervention and follow-up phase. Results: Lower intake of total fat (p=0.021) and saturated fatty acids (p=0.010), and frequent physical activity (p=0.040) during the whole study period were associated with better cognitive performance. Higher BMI (p= 0.012) and waist circumference (p= 0.012) were also associated with worse performance, but weight reduction prior to the cognition assessment predicted worse performance as well (decrease vs. increase, p= 0.008 for BMI and p= 0.002 for waist). Conclusions: Long-term dietary fat intake, BMI, and waist circumference have an inverse association with cognitive function in later life among people with IGT. However, decreases in BMI and waist prior to cognitive assessment are associated with worse cognitive performance, which could be explained by reverse causality.
  • Sullivan, Samaah M.; Broyles, Stephanie T.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Fogelholm, Mikael; Hu, Gang; Kuriyan, Rebecca; Kurpad, Anura; Lambert, Estelle V.; Maher, Carol; Maia, Jose; Matsudo, Victor; Olds, Tim; Onywera, Vincent; Sarmiento, Olga L.; Standage, Martyn; Tremblay, Mark S.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Zhao, Pei; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; ISCOLE Res Grp (2017)
    We investigated whether associations of neighborhood social environment attributes and physical activity differed among 12 countries and levels of economic development using World Bank classification (low/lower-middle-, upper-middle- and high- income countries) among 9-11 year old children (N=6161) from the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle, and the Environment (ISCOLE). Collective efficacy and perceived crime were obtained via parental/guardian report. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was assessed with waist-worn Actigraph accelerometers. Neighborhood environment by country interactions were tested using multi-level statistical models, adjusted for covariates. Effect estimates were reported by country and pooled estimates calculated across World Bank classifications for economic development using meta-analyses and forest plots. Associations between social environment attributes and MVPA varied among countries and levels of economic development. Associations were more consistent and in the hypothesized directions among countries with higher levels economic development, but less so among countries with lower levels of economic development.
  • Shiri, Rahman; Falah-Hassani, Kobra; Lallukka, Tea (2020)
    The aim of this study was to determine the associations of body mass index (BMI) with all-cause and cause-specific disability retirement. Literature searches were conducted in PubMed, Embase and Web of Science from their inception to May 2019. A total of 27 (25 prospective cohort and 2 nested case-control) studies consisting of 2 199 632 individuals qualified for a meta-analysis. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. We used a random effects meta-analysis, assessed heterogeneity and publication bias, and performed sensitivity analyses. There were a large number of participants and the majority of studies were rated at low or moderate risk of bias. There was a J-shaped relationship between BMI and disability retirement. Underweight (hazard ratio (HR)/risk ratio (RR)=1.20, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.41), overweight (HR/RR=1.13, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.19) and obese individuals (HR/RR=1.52, 95% CI 1.36 to 1.71) were more commonly granted all-cause disability retirement than normal-weight individuals. Moreover, overweight increased the risk of disability retirement due to musculoskeletal disorders (HR/RR=1.26, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.39) and cardiovascular diseases (HR=1.73, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.41), and obesity increased the risk of disability retirement due to musculoskeletal disorders (HR/RR=1.66, 95% CI 1.42 to 1.94), mental disorders (HR=1.29, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.61) and cardiovascular diseases (HR=2.80, 95% CI 1.85 to 4.24). The association between excess body mass and all-cause disability retirement did not differ between men and women and was independent of selection bias, performance bias, confounding and adjustment for publication bias. Obesity markedly increases the risk of disability retirement due to musculoskeletal disorders, cardiovascular diseases and mental disorders. Since the prevalence of obesity is increasing globally, disease burden associated with excess body mass and disability retirement consequently are projected to increase. Reviewregistrationnumber: CRD42018103110.
  • Mänty, Minna; Kouvonen, Anne; Lallukka, Tea; Lahti, Jouni; Lahelma, Eero; Rahkonen, Ossi (2018)
    Background: Changes in health functioning over different retirement transitions are poorly understood. This study aimed to examine associations between transition into statutory, disability and part-time retirement, and changes in health functioning. Methods: Survey data were collected among ageing employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland, at three phases: (i) (2000-02), (ii) (2007) and (iii) (2012). Physical and mental health functioning were measured using the Short-Form 36 questionnaire at each phase. Retirees between phases 1 and 3 were identified from the national registers of the Finnish Centre for Pensions: full-time statutory retirement (n = 1464), part-time retirement (n = 404), and disability retirement (n = 462). Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the associations. Results: Disability retirees had poorer pre-and post-retirement health functioning compared to statutory and part-time retirees. Statutory and part-time retirement were associated with no or only small changes in physical health functioning during retirement transition (beta 0.1, 95% CI - 0.3 to 0.5 and -1.0, -1.8 to -0.1, respectively), whereas a clear decline in functioning was observed among disability retirees (-4.3, -5.4 to -3.2). Mental health functioning improved during the retirement transition among statutory and part-time retirees (1.9, 1.4-2.4 and 2.0, 1.0-3.0, respectively), whereas no change was observed for disability retirees. Conclusions: Transition to disability retirement led to a decrease in physical health functioning, and statutory retirement to a slight improvement in mental health functioning. Evidence on changes in physical and mental health functioning during retirement transition process may provide useful information for interventions to promote healthy ageing.
  • Kouvonen, Anne; Vahtera, Jussi; Oksanen, Tuula; Pentti, Jaana; Vaananen, Ari K. P.; Heponiemi, Tarja; Salo, Paula; Virtanen, Marianna; Kivimäki, Mika (2013)
  • Ahola-Olli, Ari V.; Mustelin, Linda; Kalimeri, Maria; Kettunen, Johannes; Jokelainen, Jari; Auvinen, Juha; Puukka, Katri; Havulinna, Aki S.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kähönen, Mika; Juonala, Markus; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Salomaa, Veikko; Perola, Markus; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Wurtz, Peter (2019)
    Aims/hypothesis Metabolomics technologies have identified numerous blood biomarkers for type 2 diabetes risk in case-control studies of middle-aged and older individuals. We aimed to validate existing and identify novel metabolic biomarkers predictive of future diabetes in large cohorts of young adults. Methods NMR metabolomics was used to quantify 229 circulating metabolic measures in 11,896 individuals from four Finnish observational cohorts (baseline age 24-45 years). Associations between baseline metabolites and risk of developing diabetes during 8-15 years of follow-up (392 incident cases) were adjusted for sex, age, BMI and fasting glucose. Prospective metabolite associations were also tested with fasting glucose, 2 h glucose and HOMA-IR at follow-up. Results Out of 229 metabolic measures, 113 were associated with incident type 2 diabetes in meta-analysis of the four cohorts (ORs per 1 SD: 0.59-1.50; p Conclusions/interpretation Metabolic biomarkers across multiple molecular pathways are already predictive of the long-term risk of diabetes in young adults. Comprehensive metabolic profiling may help to target preventive interventions for young asymptomatic individuals at increased risk.
  • Juyani, Anne; Oksanen, Tuula; Virtanen, Marianna; Salo, Paula; Pentti, Jaana; Kivimaki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi (2018)
    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the association between co-occurring work stressors and risk of disability pension. Methods The work stressors job strain, effort-reward imbalance (ERI), and organizational injustice were measured by a survey in 2008 of 41 862 employees linked to national records of all-cause and cause-specific disability pensions until 2011. Co-occurring work stressors were examined as risk factors of work disability using Cox regression marginal models. Results Work stressors were clustered: 50.8% had no work stressors [observed-to-expected ratio (O/E)=1.2], 27.4% were exposed to one stressor (O/E=0.61-0.81), 17.7% to two stressors (O/E=0.91-1.73) and 6.4% to all three stressors (O/E=2.59). During a mean follow-up of 3.1 years, 976 disability pensions were granted. Compared to employees with no work stressors, those with (i) co-occurring strain and ERI or (ii) strain, ERI and injustice had a 1.9-2.1-fold [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-2.6] increased risk of disability retirement. The corresponding hazard ratios were 1.2 and 1.5 (95% CI 1.0-1.8) for strain and ERI alone. Risk of disability pension from depressive disorders was 4.4-4.7-fold (95% CI 2.4-8.0) for combinations of strain+ERI and strain+ERI+injustice, and 1.9-2.5-fold (95% CI 1.1-4.0) for strain and ERI alone. For musculoskeletal disorders, disability risk was 1.6-1.9-fold (95% CI 1.3-2.3) for strain+ERI and ERI+injustice combinations, and 1.3-fold (95% CI 1.0-1.7) for strain alone. Supplementary analyses with work stressors determined using work-unit aggregates supported these findings. Conclusions Work stressors tend to cluster in the same individuals. The highest risk of disability pension was observed among those with work stressor combinations strain+ERI or strain+ERI+injustice, rather than for those with single stressors.
  • Hiilamo, Aapo; Shiri, Rahman; Kouvonen, Anne; Manty, Minna; Butterworth, Peter; Pietilainen, Olli; Lahelma, Eero; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lallukka, Tea (2019)
    Objective: We examined trajectories of work disability, indicated by sickness absence and disability retirement, among midlife public sector employees with and without common mental disorders (CMD) at baseline. We also examined adverse childhood events, occupational class, long-standing illness and health behaviour as determinants of the trajectories. Methods: A sample from the Helsinki Health Study was extracted comprising 2350 employees. Baseline characteristics were obtained from mail surveys conducted in 2000-2 and 2007. CMD were measured by the General Health Questionnaire. Participants were followed between the ages of 50-59. Work disability trajectories were modelled by the annual number of work disability months in group-based trajectory analysis. Multinomial regression was used to predict trajectory group memberships. Results: Three trajectories were identified: no work disability (consisting 59% of the all employees), stable/low (31%) and high/increasing disability (10%). Employees with CMD were more likely to belong to the stable/low (odds ratio 1.73 [95% confidence interval 1.37-2.18]), and the high/increasing (2.55 [1.81-3.59]) trajectories. Stratified models showed that the determinants of the trajectories were largely similar for those with CMD compared to those without CMD except that obesity was a somewhat stronger predictor of the high/increasing trajectory among employees with CMD. Limitations: The focus on midlife public sector employees limits the generalisability to other employment sectors and younger employees. Conclusions: CMD were strongly associated with a trajectory leading to early exit from employment and a stable/ low work disability trajectory. These findings have implications for interventions promoting work ability of employees with mental ill-health.
  • Matz, Karl; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Teuschl, Yvonne; Dachenhausen, Alexandra; Brainin, Michael (2020)
    Background Diabetes is an increasingly important risk factor for ischemic stroke and worsens stroke prognosis. Yet a large proportion of stroke patients who are eventually diabetic are undiagnosed. Therefore, it is important to have sensitive assessment of unrecognized hyperglycaemia in stroke patients. Design Secondary outcome analysis of a randomized controlled trial focussing on parameters of glucose metabolism and detection of diabetes and prediabetes in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Methods A total of 130 consecutively admitted patients with AIS without previously known type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were screened for diabetes or prediabetes as part of secondary outcome analysis of a randomized controlled trial that tested lifestyle intervention to prevent post-stroke cognitive decline. Patients had the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) measurements in the second week after stroke onset and after 1 year. The detection rates of diabetes and prediabetes based on the OGTT or HbA1c values were compared. Results By any of the applied tests at the second week after stroke onset 62 of 130 patients (48%) had prediabetes or T2DM. Seventy-five patients had results from both tests available, the OGTT and HbA1c; according to the OGTT 40 (53.3%) patients had normal glucose metabolism, 33 (44%) had prediabetes, two (2.7%) T2DM. In 50 (66.7%) patients the HbA1c results were normal, 24 (32%) in the prediabetic and one (1.3%) in the diabetic range. The detection rate for disorders of glucose metabolism was 10% higher (absolute difference; relative difference 29%) with the OGTT compared with HbA1c. After 1 year the detection rate for prediabetes or T2DM was 7% higher with the OGTT (26% relative difference). The study intervention led to a more favourable evolution of glycemic status after 1 year. Conclusion The OGTT is a more sensitive screening tool than HbA1c for the detection of previously unrecognized glycemic disorders in patients with acute stroke with an at least a 25% relative difference in detection rate. Therefore, an OGTT should be performed in all patients with stroke with no history of diabetes. Trial registration. Unique identifier: NCT01109836.
  • Key, Timothy J.; Appleby, Paul N.; Bradbury, Kathryn E.; Sweeting, Michael; Wood, Angela; Johansson, Ingegerd; Kuehn, Tilman; Steur, Marinka; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Wennberg, Maria; Wuertz, Anne Mette Lund; Agudo, Antonio; Andersson, Jonas; Arriola, Larraitz; Boeing, Heiner; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Bonnet, Fabrice; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Cross, Amanda J.; Ericson, Ulrika; Fagherazzi, Guy; Ferrari, Pietro; Gunter, Marc; Huerta, Jose Maria; Katzke, Verena; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Krogh, Vittorio; La Vecchia, Carlo; Matullo, Giuseppe; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi; Naska, Androniki; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Molina-Portillo, Elena; Quiros, J. Ramon; Skeie, Guri; Sluijs, Ivonne; Sonestedt, Emily; Stepien, Magdalena; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Tumino, Rosario; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Langenberg, Claudia; Forouhi, Nita; Wareham, Nick; Butterworth, Adam; Riboli, Elio; Danesh, John (2019)
    Background: There is uncertainty about the relevance of animal foods to the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease (IHD). We examined meat, fish, dairy products, and eggs and risk for IHD in the pan-European EPIC cohort (European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition). Methods: In this prospective study of 409 885 men and women in 9 European countries, diet was assessed with validated questionnaires and calibrated with 24-hour recalls. Lipids and blood pressure were measured in a subsample. During a mean of 12.6 years of follow-up, 7198 participants had a myocardial infarction or died of IHD. The relationships of animal foods with risk were examined with Cox regression with adjustment for other animal foods and relevant covariates. Results: The hazard ratio (HR) for IHD was 1.19 (95% CI, 1.06-1.33) for a 100-g/d increment in intake of red and processed meat, and this remained significant after exclusion of the first 4 years of follow-up (HR, 1.25 [95% CI, 1.09-1.42]). Risk was inversely associated with intakes of yogurt (HR, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.89-0.98] per 100-g/d increment), cheese (HR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.86-0.98] per 30-g/d increment), and eggs (HR, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.88-0.99] per 20-g/d increment); the associations with yogurt and eggs were attenuated and nonsignificant after exclusion of the first 4 years of follow-up. Risk was not significantly associated with intakes of poultry, fish, or milk. In analyses modeling dietary substitutions, replacement of 100 kcal/d from red and processed meat with 100 kcal/d from fatty fish, yogurt, cheese, or eggs was associated with approximate to 20% lower risk of IHD. Consumption of red and processed meat was positively associated with serum non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and systolic blood pressure, and consumption of cheese was inversely associated with serum non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Conclusions: Risk for IHD was positively associated with consumption of red and processed meat and inversely associated with consumption of yogurt, cheese, and eggs, although the associations with yogurt and eggs may be influenced by reverse causation bias. It is not clear whether the associations with red and processed meat and cheese reflect causality, but they were consistent with the associations of these foods with plasma non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and for red and processed meat with systolic blood pressure, which could mediate such effects.
  • Lehtisalo, Jenni; Lindstrom, Jaana; Ngandu, Tiia; Kivipelto, Miia; Ahtiluoto, Satu; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Eriksson, Johan G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Luchsinger, Jose A.; Finnish Diabet Prevention Study DP (2016)
    BackgroundType 2 diabetes is linked with cognitive dysfunction and dementia in epidemiological studies, but these observations are limited by lack of data on the exact timing of diabetes onset. We investigated diabetes, dysglycaemia, and cognition in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, in which the timing and duration of diabetes are well documented. MethodsThe Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study comprised middle-aged, overweight participants with impaired glucose tolerance but no diabetes at baseline (n=522), randomized to lifestyle intervention or a control group. After an intervention period (mean duration 4years) and follow-up (additional 9years), cognitive assessment with the CERAD test battery and Trail Making Test A (TMT) was executed twice within a 2-year interval. Of the 364 (70%) participants with cognitive assessments, 171 (47%) had developed diabetes. ResultsCognitive function did not differ between those who developed diabetes and those who did not. Lower mean 2-h glucose at an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and HbA(1C) during the intervention period predicted better performance in the TMT (p=0.012 and 0.024, respectively). Those without diabetes or with short duration of diabetes improved in CERAD total score between the two assessments (p=0.001) whereas those with long duration of diabetes did not (p=0.844). ConclusionsBetter glycemic control among persons with baseline impaired glucose tolerance predicted better cognitive performance 9years later in this secondary analysis of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study population. In addition, learning effects in cognitive testing were not evident in people with long diabetes duration. Copyright (c) 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • Dayeh, Tasnim; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Almgren, Peter; Perfilyev, Alexander; Jansson, Per-Anders; de Mello, Vanessa D.; Pihlajamaki, Jussi; Vaag, Allan; Groop, Leif; Nilsson, Emma; Ling, Charlotte (2016)
    Identification of subjects with a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) is fundamental for prevention of the disease. Consequently, it is essential to search for new biomarkers that can improve the prediction of T2D. The aim of this study was to examine whether 5 DNA methylation loci in blood DNA (ABCG1, PHOSPHO1, SOCS3, SREBF1, and TXNIP), recently reported to be associated with T2D, might predict future T2D in subjects from the Botnia prospective study. We also tested if these CpG sites exhibit altered DNA methylation in human pancreatic islets, liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle from diabetic vs. non-diabetic subjects. DNA methylation at the ABCG1 locus cg06500161 in blood DNA was associated with an increased risk for future T2D (OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.02-1.16, P-value = 0.007, Q-value = 0.018), while DNA methylation at the PHOSPHO1 locus cg02650017 in blood DNA was associated with a decreased risk for future T2D (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.75-0.95, P-value = 0.006, Q-value = 0.018) after adjustment for age, gender, fasting glucose, and family relation. Furthermore, the level of DNA methylation at the ABCG1 locus cg06500161 in blood DNA correlated positively with BMI, HbA1c, fasting insulin, and triglyceride levels, and was increased in adipose tissue and blood from the diabetic twin among monozygotic twin pairs discordant for T2D. DNA methylation at the PHOSPHO1 locus cg02650017 in blood correlated positively with HDL levels, and was decreased in skeletal muscle from diabetic vs. non-diabetic monozygotic twins. DNA methylation of cg18181703 (SOCS3), cg11024682 (SREBF1), and cg19693031 (TXNIP) was not associated with future T2D risk in subjects from the Botnia prospective study.
  • Serlachius, Anna; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Juonala, Markus; Sabin, Matthew; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Elovainio, Marko (2017)
    Objective: The transmission of overweight from one generation to the next is well established, however little is known about what psychosocial factors may protect against this familial risk. The aim of this study was to examine whether optimism plays a role in the intergenerational transmission of obesity. Methods: Our sample included 1043 participants from the prospective Cardiovascular Risk in Young FINNS Study. Optimism was measured in early adulthood (2001) when the cohort was aged 24-39 years. BMI was measured in 2001 (baseline) and 2012 when they were aged 35-50 years. Parental BMI was measured in 1980. Hierarchical linear regression and logistic regression were used to examine the association between optimism and future BMI/obesity, and whether an interaction existed between optimism and parental BMI when predicting BMI/obesity 11 years later. Results: High optimism in young adulthood demonstrated a negative relationship with high BMI in mid-adulthood, but only in women (beta = - 0.127, p = 0.001). The optimism x maternal BMI interaction term was a significant predictor of future BMI in women (beta = 0.588, p = 0.036). The logistic regression results confirmed that high optimism predicted reduced obesity in women (OR = 0.68, 95% CI, 0.55-0.86), however the optimism x maternal obesity interaction term was not a significant predictor (OR = 0.50, 95% CI, 0.10-2.48). Conclusions: Our findings supported our hypothesis that high optimism mitigated the intergenerational transmission of high BMI, but only in women. These findings also provided evidence that positive psychosocial factors such as optimism are associated with long-term protective effects on BMI in women.
  • Ervasti, Jenni; Airaksinen, Jaakko; Pentti, Jaana; Vahtera, Jussi; Suominen, Sakari; Virtanen, Marianna; Kivimäki, Mika (2019)
    Objectives We examined the extent to which an increase in physical activity would reduce the excess risk of work disability among overweight and obese people (body mass index >= 25kg/m(2)). Methods We used counterfactual modelling approaches to analyze longitudinal data from two Finnish prospective cohort studies (total N=38 744). Weight, height and physical activity were obtained from surveys and assessed twice and linked to electronic records of two indicators of long-term work disability (>= 90-day sickness absence and disability pension) for a 7-year follow-up after the latter survey. The models were adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic status, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Results The confounder-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of long-term sickness absence for overweight compared to normal-weight participants was 1.43 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-1.53]. An increase in physical activity among overweight compared to normal-weight individuals was estimated to reduce this HR to 1.40 (95% CI 1.31-1.48). In pseudo-trial analysis including only the persistently overweight, initially physically inactive participants, the HR for long-term sickness absence was 0.82 (95% CI 0.70-0.94) for individuals with increased physical activity compared to those who remained physically inactive. The results for disability pension as an outcome were similar. Conclusions These findings suggest that the excess risk of work disability among overweight individuals would drop by 3-4% if they increased their average physical activity to the average level of normal-weight people. However, overweight individuals who are physically inactive would reduce their risk of work disability by about 20% by becoming physically active.
  • Konstantinou, Despoina; Popin, Rafael; Fewer, David P.; Sivonen, Kaarina; Gkelis, Spyros (2021)
    Sponges form symbiotic relationships with diverse and abundant microbial communities. Cyanobacteria are among the most important members of the microbial communities that are associated with sponges. Here, we performed a genus-wide comparative genomic analysis of the newly described marine benthic cyanobacterial genus Leptothoe (Synechococcales). We obtained draft genomes from Le. kymatousa TAU-MAC 1615 and Le. spongobia TAU-MAC 1115, isolated from marine sponges. We identified five additional Leptothoe genomes, host-associated or free-living, using a phylogenomic approach, and the comparison of all genomes showed that the sponge-associated strains display features of a symbiotic lifestyle. Le. kymatousa and Le. spongobia have undergone genome reduction; they harbored considerably fewer genes encoding for (i) cofactors, vitamins, prosthetic groups, pigments, proteins, and amino acid biosynthesis; (ii) DNA repair; (iii) antioxidant enzymes; and (iv) biosynthesis of capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. They have also lost several genes related to chemotaxis and motility. Eukaryotic-like proteins, such as ankyrin repeats, playing important roles in sponge-symbiont interactions, were identified in sponge-associated Leptothoe genomes. The sponge-associated Leptothoe stains harbored biosynthetic gene clusters encoding novel natural products despite genome reduction. Comparisons of the biosynthetic capacities of Leptothoe with chemically rich cyanobacteria revealed that Leptothoe is another promising marine cyanobacterium for the biosynthesis of novel natural products.
  • Ward, Heather A.; Whitman, Julia; Muller, David C.; Johansson, Mattias; Jakszyn, Paula; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Palli, Domenico; Fanidi, Anouar; Vermeulen, Roel; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Dahm, Christina C.; Overvad, Kim; Severi, Gianluca; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Affret, Aurelie; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renee; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Berrino, Franco; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Peeters, Petra H.; Nost, Therese Haugdahl; Sandanger, Torkjel M.; Ramon Quiros, Jose; Agudo, Antonio; Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel; Larranaga, Nerea; Maria Huerta, Jose; Ardanaz, Eva; Drake, Isabel; Brunnstrom, Hans; Johansson, Mikael; Grankvist, Kjell; Travis, Ruth C.; Freisling, Heinz; Stepien, Magdalena; Merritt, Melissa A.; Riboli, Elio; Cross, Amanda J. (2019)
    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that haem iron, which is found predominantly in red meat and increases endogenous formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds, may be positively associated with lung cancer. The objective was to examine the relationship between haem iron intake and lung cancer risk using detailed smoking history data and serum cotinine to control for potential confounding. Methods In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 416,746 individuals from 10 countries completed demographic and dietary questionnaires at recruitment. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident lung cancer (n = 3731) risk relative to haem iron, non-haem iron, and total dietary iron intake. A corresponding analysis was conducted among a nested subset of 800 lung cancer cases and 1489 matched controls for whom serum cotinine was available. Results Haem iron was associated with lung cancer risk, including after adjustment for details of smoking history (time since quitting, number of cigarettes per day): as a continuous variable (HR per 0.3 mg/1000 kcal 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.07), and in the highest versus lowest quintile (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.02-1.32; trend across quintiles: P = 0.035). In contrast, non-haem iron intake was related inversely with lung cancer risk; however, this association attenuated after adjustment for smoking history. Additional adjustment for serum cotinine did not considerably alter the associations detected in the nested case-control subset. Conclusions Greater haem iron intake may be modestly associated with lung cancer risk.
  • Kero, A. E.; Madanat-Harjuoja, L. M.; Jarvela, L. S.; Malila, N.; Matomaki, J.; Lahteenmaki, P. M. (2016)
    Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors are at risk for developing metabolic syndrome (MetS), which subsequently leads to cardiovascular morbidity and excess mortality. Our aim was to investigate the purchases of medications associated with MetS among 7551 early onset cancer patients compared to siblings. Methods: Our nationwide Finnish population-based registry study analyzed the drug purchase of medication among early onset cancer patients diagnosed with cancer below the age of 35 years between 1994 and 2004 compared to siblings by linkage to the drug purchase registry, allowing for a maximal follow-up of 18 years. Results: The hazard ratios (HRs) for purchasing antihypertensives and diabetes drugs were higher after both childhood (HR 4.6, 95% CI 3.1-7.0; HR 3.0, 95% 1.5-6.1) and young adulthood (YA) cancer (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.3-1.8; HR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.2) compared to siblings. The HRs for purchasing lipid-lowering drugs were elevated both after childhood (HR 4.3,95% CI 0.9-19.5) and YA cancer (HR 1.6, 95% CI 1.04-2.5), but only reached significance in YA cancer patients. Among specific cancer diagnosis groups, highest HR values for antihypertensives were found in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (HR 6.1, 95% CI 3.7-10.3) and bone tumor (HR 4.3, 95% CI 1.9-9.4), and YA ALL (HR 4.8, 95% CI 3.1-7.0) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (HR 3.4, 95% CI 2.5-5.1) patients. Moreover, childhood ALL (HR 6.3, 95% CI 2.7-14.8), AML (HR 7.6, 95% CI 1.9-24.5) and central nervous system (CNS)-tumor (HR 3.5, 95% CI 1.3-9.2) and YA ALL (HR 3.7, 95% CI 1.2-9.5) patients showed the strongest likelihood of purchasing diabetes drugs compared to siblings. Conclusion: The purchase of medications associated with MetS was increased after early onset cancer and highly dependent on the age at cancer diagnosis and the cancer diagnosis. Prevention strategies are imperative for reducing potentially life-threatening cardiovascular complications after early onset cancer. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.