Browsing by Subject "LITTER"

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  • Sun, Hui; Santalahti, Minna; Pumpanen, Jukka; Köster, Kajar; Berninger, Frank; Raffaello, Tommaso; Asiegbu, Fred O.; Heinonsalo, Jussi (2016)
    Soil microbial responses to fire are likely to change over the course of forest recovery. Investigations on long-term changes in bacterial dynamics following fire are rare. We characterized the soil bacterial communities across three different times post fire in a 2 to 152-year fire chronosequence by Illumina MiSeq sequencing, coupled with a functional gene array (GeoChip). The results showed that the bacterial diversity did not differ between the recently and older burned areas, suggesting a concomitant recovery in the bacterial diversity after fire. The differences in bacterial communities over time were mainly driven by the rare operational taxonomic units (OTUs <0.1%). Proteobacteria (39%), Acidobacteria (34%) and Actinobacteria (17%) were the most abundant phyla across all sites. Genes involved in C and N cycling pathways were present in all sites showing high redundancy in the gene profiles. However, hierarchical cluster analysis using gene signal intensity revealed that the sites with different fire histories formed separate clusters, suggesting potential differences in maintaining essential biogeochemical soil processes. Soil temperature, pH and water contents were the most important factors in shaping the bacterial community structures and function. This study provides functional insight on the impact of fire disturbance on soil bacterial community.
  • Mäki, Mari; Aaltonen, Hermanni; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Hellén, Heidi; Pumpanen, Jukka; Bäck, Jaana (2019)
    Vegetation emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are intensively studied world-wide, because oxidation products of VOCs contribute to atmospheric processes. The overall aim of this study was to identify and quantify the VOCs that originate from boreal podzolized forest soil at different depths, in addition to studying the association of VOC concentrations with VOC and CO2 fluxes from the boreal forest floor.
  • Viskari, Toni; Laine, Maisa; Kulmala, Liisa; Mäkelä, Jarmo; Fer, Istem; Liski, Jari (2020)
    Model-calculated forecasts of soil organic carbon (SOC) are important for approximating global terrestrial carbon pools and assessing their change. However, the lack of detailed observations limits the reliability and applicability of these SOC projections. Here, we studied whether state data assimilation (SDA) can be used to continuously update the modeled state with available total carbon measurements in order to improve future SOC estimations. We chose six fallow test sites with measurement time series spanning 30 to 80 years for this initial test. In all cases, SDA improved future projections but to varying degrees. Furthermore, already including the first few measurements impacted the state enough to reduce the error in decades-long projections by at least 1 tCha(-1). Our results show the benefits of implementing SDA methods for forecasting SOC as well as highlight implementation aspects that need consideration and further research.
  • Adamczyk, Bartosz; Sietio, Outi-Maaria; Biasi, Christina; Heinonsalo, Jussi (2019)
    See also the Commentary on this article by Hattenschwiler et al., 223: 5-7.
  • Strakova, Petra; Larmola, Tuula; Andres, Javier; Ilola, Noora; Launiainen, Piia; Edwards, Keith; Minkkinen, Kari; Laiho, Raija (2020)
    Evidence of plant root biomass and production in peatlands at the level of species or plant functional type (PFT) is needed for defining ecosystem functioning and predicting its future development. However, such data are limited due to methodological difficulties and the toilsomeness of separating roots from peat. We developed Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy based calibration models for quantifying the mass proportions of several common peatland species, and alternatively, the PFTs that these species represented, in composite root samples. We further tested whether woody roots could be classified into diameter classes, and whether dead and living roots could be separated. We aimed to solve whether general models applicable in different studies can be developed, and what would be the best way to build such models. FTIR spectra were measured from dried and powdered roots: both "pure roots", original samples of 25 species collected in the field, and "root mixtures", artificial composite samples prepared by mixing known amounts of pure roots of different species. Partial least squares regression was used to build the calibration models. The general applicability of the models was tested using roots collected in different sites or times. Our main finding is that pure roots can replace complex mixtures as calibration data. Using pure roots, we constructed generally applicable models for quantification of roots of the main PFTs of northern peatlands. The models provided accurate estimates even for far distant sites, with root mean square error (RMSE) 1.4-6.6% for graminoids, forbs and ferns. For shrubs and trees the estimates were less accurate due to higher within-species heterogeneity, partly related to variation in root diameter. Still, we obtained RMSE 3.9-10.8% for total woody roots, but up to 20.1% for different woody-root types. Species-level and dead-root models performed well within the calibration dataset but provided unacceptable estimates for independent samples, limiting their routine application in field conditions. Our PFT-level models can be applied on roots separated from soil for biomass determination or from ingrowth cores for estimating root production. We present possibilities for further development of species-level or dead-root models using the pure-root approach.
  • Lindstrom, Stafva; Timonen, Sari; Sundstrom, Liselotte (2021)
    In a subarctic climate, the seasonal shifts in temperature, precipitation, and plant cover drive the temporal changes in the microbial communities in the topsoil, forcing soil microbes to adapt or decline. Many organisms, such as mound-building ants, survive the cold winter owing to the favorable microclimate in their nest mounds. We have previously shown that the microbial communities in the nest of the ant Formica exsecta are significantly different from those in the surrounding bulk soil. In the current study, we identified taxa, which were consistently present in the nests over a study period of three years. Some taxa were also significantly enriched in the nest samples compared with spatially corresponding reference soils. We show that the bacterial communities in ant nests are temporally stable across years, whereas the fungal communities show greater variation. It seems that the activities of the ants contribute to unique biochemical processes in the secluded nest environment, and create opportunities for symbiotic interactions between the ants and the microbes. Over time, the microbial communities may come to diverge, due to drift and selection, especially given the long lifespan (up to 30 years) of the ant colonies.
  • Wei, Lili; Vosatka, Miroslav; Cai, Bangping; Ding, Jing; Lu, Changyi; Xu, Jinghua; Yan, Wenfei; Li, Yuhong; Liu, Chaoxiang (2019)
    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are widespread in terrestrial ecosystems. In addition to their contributions to plant nutrient uptake, AMF also provide many ecological functions including regulation of soil C dynamics. However, both stimulating and retarding soil organic decomposition by AMF have been observed. Here we discuss the possible reasons for such a contradiction. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi contribute to soil aggregation mainly through hyphal enmeshment, saprotrophic suppression, and production of glomalin-related soil proteins, while AMF can also stimulate organic decomposition through promoting degradative enzymes, modifying root production and activity, and/or through regulating the microbial community in the mycorrhizosphere and hyphosphere. The role of AMF in C decomposition is strongly dependent on the quality and quantity of different soil C pools. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi can stimulate fresh residue decomposition initially through stimulating the decomposition of fresh residues (particularly those having high C/N ratio), whereas for older or decomposed soil organic C, AMF tend to suppress decomposition by promoting soil aggregation. Under elevated CO2 (eCO(2)), AMF show additive effects on residue decomposition, priming effects, and changes in soil a regation. Despite organic decomposition rates differing in the short term and long term following litter experiments, our discussion highlights the role of AMF in organic C dynamics. We hypothesize that AMF would benefit soil C gain in the long term and thereby predict that disturbances that impacts negatively on AMF, such as tillage, residue burning, fertilization, and fungicide application, would lead to soil C decline particularly under eCO(2).