Browsing by Subject "LOW-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN"

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  • Riederer, Monika; Ojala, Pauli J.; Hrzenjak, Andelko; Tritscher, Michaela; Hermansson, Martin; Watzer, Bernhard; Schweer, Horst; Desoye, Gernot; Heinemann, Akos; Frank, Sasa (2010)
  • Rao, Shailaja P.; Riederer, Monika; Lechleitner, Margarete; Hermansson, Martin; Desoye, Gernot; Hallstroem, Seth; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Frank, Sasa (2013)
  • Meneses-Salas, Elsa; García-Melero, Ana; Kanerva, Kristiina; Blanco-Muñoz, Patricia; Morales-Paytuvi, Frederic; Bonjoch, Júlia; Heeren, Joerg; Lu, Albert; Pol, Albert; Tebar, Francesc; Ikonen, Elina; Grewal, Thomas; Enrich, Carlos; Rentero, Carles (2020)
    Cholesterol accumulation in late endosomes is a prevailing phenotype of Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) mutant cells. Likewise, annexin A6 (AnxA6) overexpression induces a phenotype reminiscent of NPC1 mutant cells. Here, we demonstrate that this cellular cholesterol imbalance is due to AnxA6 promoting Rab7 inactivation via TBC1D15, a Rab7-GAP. In NPC1 mutant cells, AnxA6 depletion and eventual Rab7 activation was associated with peripheral distribution and increased mobility of late endosomes. This was accompanied by an enhanced lipid accumulation in lipid droplets in an acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT)-dependent manner. Moreover, in AnxA6-deficient NPC1 mutant cells, Rab7-mediated rescue of late endosome-cholesterol export required the StAR-related lipid transfer domain-3 (StARD3) protein. Electron microscopy revealed a significant increase of membrane contact sites (MCS) between late endosomes and ER in NPC1 mutant cells lacking AnxA6, suggesting late endosome-cholesterol transfer to the ER via Rab7 and StARD3-dependent MCS formation. This study identifies AnxA6 as a novel gatekeeper that controls cellular distribution of late endosome-cholesterol via regulation of a Rab7-GAP and MCS formation.
  • Nguyen, Su Duy; Javanainen, Matti; Rissanen, Sami; Zhao, Hongxia; Huusko, Jenni; Kivelä, Annukka M.; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Navab, Mohamad; Fogelman, Alan M.; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Kovanen, Petri T.; Öörni, Katariina (2015)
    Lipolytic modification of LDL particles by SMase generates LDL aggregates with a strong affinity for human arterial proteoglycans and may so enhance LDL retention in the arterial wall. Here, we evaluated the effects of apoA-I mimetic peptide 4F on structural and functional properties of the SMase-modified LDL particles. LDL particles with and without 4F were incubated with SMase, after which their aggregation, structure, and proteoglycan binding were analyzed. At a molar ratio of L-4F to apoB-100 of 2.5 to 20: 1, 4F dose-dependently inhibited SMase-induced LDL aggregation. At a molar ratio of 20: 1, SMase-induced aggregation was fully blocked. Binding of 4F to LDL particles inhibited SMase-induced hydrolysis of LDL by 10% and prevented SMase-induced LDL aggregation. In addition, the binding of the SMase-modifi ed LDL particles to human aortic proteoglycans was dose-dependently inhibited by pretreating LDL with 4F. The 4F stabilized apoB-100 conformation and inhibited SMase-induced conformational changes of apoB-100. Molecular dynamic simulations showed that upon binding to protein-free LDL surface, 4F locally alters membrane order and fluidity and induces structural changes to the lipid layer. Collectively, 4F stabilizes LDL particles by preventing the SMase-induced conformational changes in apoB-100 and so blocks SMase-induced LDL aggregation and the resulting increase in LDL retention.
  • Packard, Chris J.; Boren, Jan; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta (2020)
    Elevations in plasma triglyceride are the result of overproduction and impaired clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins-very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) and chylomicrons. Hypertriglyceridemia is characterized by an accumulation in the circulation of large VLDL-VLDL1-and its lipolytic products, and throughout the VLDL-LDL delipidation cascade perturbations occur that give rise to increased concentrations of remnant lipoproteins and small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The elevated risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in hypertriglyceridemia is believed to result from the exposure of the artery wall to these aberrant lipoprotein species. Key regulators of the metabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins have been identified and a number of these are targets for pharmacological intervention. However, a clear picture is yet to emerge as to how to relate triglyceride lowering to reduced risk of atherosclerosis.
  • Kumpula, Linda S.; Makela, Sanna M.; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Karjalainen, Anna; Liinamaa, Johanna M.; Kaski, Kimmo; Savolainen, Markku J.; Hannuksela, Minna L.; Ala-Korpela, Mika (2010)
  • Siljamaki, Elina; Rintanen, Nina; Kirsi, Maija; Upla, Paula; Wang, Wei; Karjalainen, Mikko; Ikonen, Elina; Marjomaki, Varpu (2013)
  • Mantyselka, Pekka; Niskanen, Leo; Kautiainen, Hannu; Saltevo, Juha; Wurtz, Peter; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J.; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Vanhala, Mauno (2014)
  • Lehti, Satu; Nguyen, Su D.; Belevich, Ilya; Vihinen, Helena; Heikkilä, Hanna M.; Soliymani, Rabah; Käkelä, Reijo; Saksi, Jani; Jauhiainen, Matti; Grabowski, Gregory A.; Kummu, Outi; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Baumann, Marc; Lindsberg, Perttu J.; Jokitalo, Eija; Kovanen, Petri T.; Öörni, Katariina (2018)
    Lipid accumulation is a key characteristic of advancing atherosclerotic lesions. Herein, we analyzed the ultrastructure of the accumulated Lipids in endarterectomized human carotid atherosclerotic plaques using three-dimensional (3D) electron microscopy, a method never used in this context before. 3D electron microscopy revealed intracellular lipid droplets and extracellular Lipoprotein particles. Most of the particles were aggregated, and some connected to needle-shaped or sheet-like cholesterol crystals. Proteomic analysis of isolated extracellular Lipoprotein particles revealed that apolipoprotein B is their main protein component, indicating their origin from low-density lipoprotein, intermediate-density Lipoprotein, very-Low-density lipoprotein, lipoprotein (a), or chylomicron remnants. The particles also contained small exchangeable apolipoproteins, complement components, and immunoglobulins. Lipidomic analysis revealed differences between plasma lipoproteins and the particles, thereby indicating involvement of lipolytic enzymes in their generation. Incubation of human monocyte-derived macrophages with the isolated extracellular lipoprotein particles or with plasma lipoproteins that had been Lipolytically modified in vitro induced intracellular Lipid accumulation and triggered inflammasome activation in them. Taken together, extracellular Lipids accumulate in human carotid plaques as distinct 3D structures that include aggregated and fused lipoprotein particles and cholesterol crystals. The particles originate from plasma lipoproteins, show signs of lipolytic modifications, and associate with cholesterol crystals. By inducing intracellular cholesterol accumulation (ie, foam cell formation) and inflammasome activation, the extracellular lipoprotein particles may actively enhance atherogenesis.
  • Wiegman, Albert; Gidding, Samuel S.; Watts, Gerald F.; Chapman, M. John; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Cuchel, Marina; Ose, Leiv; Averna, Maurizio; Boileau, Catherine; Boren, Jan; Bruckert, Eric; Catapano, Alberico L.; Defesche, Joep C.; Descamps, Olivier S.; Hegele, Robert A.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Humphries, Steve E.; Kovanen, Petri T.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Masana, Luis; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Pajukanta, Paevi; Parhofer, Klaus G.; Raal, Frederick J.; Ray, Kausik K.; Santos, Raul D.; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Stroes, Erik S.; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Wiklund, Olov; European Atherosclerosis Soc Conse (2015)
    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is a common genetic cause of premature coronary heart disease (CHD). Globally, one baby is born with FH every minute. If diagnosed and treated early in childhood, individuals with FH can have normal life expectancy. This consensus paper aims to improve awareness of the need for early detection and management of FH children. Familial hypercholesterolaemia is diagnosed either on phenotypic criteria, i.e. an elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level plus a family history of elevated LDL-C, premature coronary artery disease and/or genetic diagnosis, or positive genetic testing. Childhood is the optimal period for discrimination between FH and non-FH using LDL-C screening. An LDL-C a parts per thousand yen5 mmol/L (190 mg/dL), or an LDL-C a parts per thousand yen4 mmol/L (160 mg/dL) with family history of premature CHD and/or high baseline cholesterol in one parent, make the phenotypic diagnosis. If a parent has a genetic defect, the LDL-C cut-off for the child is a parts per thousand yen3.5 mmol/L (130 mg/dL). We recommend cascade screening of families using a combined phenotypic and genotypic strategy. In children, testing is recommended from age 5 years, or earlier if homozygous FH is suspected. A healthy lifestyle and statin treatment (from age 8 to 10 years) are the cornerstones of management of heterozygous FH. Target LDL-C is <3.5 mmol/L (130 mg/dL) if > 10 years, or ideally 50% reduction from baseline if 8-10 years, especially with very high LDL-C, elevated lipoprotein(a), a family history of premature CHD or other cardiovascular risk factors, balanced against the long-term risk of treatment side effects. Identifying FH early and optimally lowering LDL-C over the lifespan reduces cumulative LDL-C burden and offers health and socioeconomic benefits. To drive policy change for timely detection and management, we call for further studies in the young. Increased awareness, early identification, and optimal treatment from childhood are critical to adding decades of healthy life for children and adolescents with FH.
  • Meri, Seppo; Haapasalo, Karita (2020)
    Complement-mediated inflammation or dysregulation in lipid metabolism are associated with the pathogenesis of several diseases. These include age-related macular degeneration (AMD), C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN), dense deposit disease (DDD), atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In all these diseases, formation of characteristic lipid-rich deposits is evident. Here, we will discuss molecular mechanisms whereby dysfunction of complement, and especially of its key regulator factor H, could be involved in lipid accumulation and related inflammation. The genetic associations to factor H polymorphisms, the role of factor H in the resolution of inflammation in lipid-rich deposits, modification of macrophage functions, and complement-mediated clearance of apoptotic and damaged cells indicate that the function of factor H is crucial in limiting inflammation in these diseases.
  • Matikainen, Niina; Burza, Maria Antonella; Romeo, Stefano; Hakkarainen, Antti; Adiels, Martin; Folkersen, Lasse; Eriksson, Per; Lundbom, Nina; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Orho-Melander, Marju; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Boren, Jan (2013)
  • Maaninka, Katariina; Nguyen, Su Duy; Mäyränpää, Mikko I.; Plihtari, Riia; Rajamäki, Kristiina; Lindsberg, Perttu J.; Kovanen, Petri T.; Öörni, Katariina (2018)
    Background and aims: Subendothelial interaction of LDL with extracellular matrix drives atherogenesis. This interaction can be strengthened by proteolytic modification of LDL. Mast cells (MCs) are present in atherosclerotic lesions, and upon activation, they degranulate and release a variety of neutral proteases. Here we studied the ability of MC proteases to cleave apoB-100 of LDL and affect the binding of LDL to proteoglycans. Methods: Mature human MCs were differentiated from human peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) progenitors in vitro and activated with calcium ionophore to generate MC-conditioned medium. LDL was incubated in the MC-conditioned medium or with individual MC proteases, and the binding of native and modified LDL to isolated human aortic proteoglycans or to human atherosclerotic plaques ex vivo was determined. MC proteases in atherosclerotic human coronary artery lesions were detected by immunofluorescence and qPCR. Results: Activated human MCs released the neutral proteases tryptase, chymase, carboxypeptidase A3, cathepsin G, and granzyme B. Of these, cathepsin G degraded most efficiently apoB-100, induced LDL fusion, and enhanced binding of LDL to isolated human aortic proteoglycans and human atherosclerotic lesions ex vivo. Double immunofluoresence staining of human atherosclerotic coronary arteries for tryptase and cathepsin G indicated that lesional MCs contain cathepsin G. In the lesions, expression of cathepsin G correlated with the expression of tryptase and chymase, but not with that of neutrophil proteinase 3. Conclusions: The present study suggests that cathepsin G in human atherosclerotic lesions is largely derived from MCs and that activated MCs may contribute to atherogenesis by enhancing LDL retention. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Kyrklund, Mikael; Bildo, Mika; Akhi, Ramin; Nissinen, Antti E.; Pussinen, Pirkko; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Wang, Chunguang (2020)
    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease and major cause of mortality worldwide. One of the crucial steps for atherosclerotic plaque development is oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Through the oxidation, highly immunogenic epitopes are created and the immune system is activated. Association between atherosclerosis and periodontal diseases is well documented, and one of the main oral pathogens common in periodontitis is Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) is an important virulence factor for Aa bacteria and a strong activator of the immune system. Cross-reactivity of HSP60 and oxidized LDL (OxLDL) antibodies could be a potential mechanism in the progression of atherosclerosis and one possible link between atherosclerosis and periodontitis. Human plasma samples from neonates and mothers were analyzed to determine if antibody titer to Aa-HSP60 protein is already present in newborns. Further objectives were to characterize antibody response in Aa-HSP60 immunized mice and to determine possible antibody cross-reaction with oxidized LDL. We demonstrated that newborns already have IgM antibody levels to Aa-HSP60. We also showed that in mice, Aa-HSP60 immunization provoked IgG and IgM antibody response not only to Aa-HSP60 but also to malondialdehyde acetaldehyde-modified LDL (MAA-LDL). Competition assay revealed that the antibodies were specific to Aa-HSP60 and cross-reacted with MAA-LDL. Our results suggest a possibility of molecular mimicry between Aa-HSP60 and MAA-LDL, making it intriguing to speculate on the role of HSP60 protein in atherosclerosis that manifests at young age.
  • Ruuth, Maija; Janssen, Laura G. M.; Aikas, Lauri; Tigistu-Sahle, Feven; Nahon, Kimberly J.; Ritvos, Olli; Ruhanen, Hanna; Käkelä, Reijo; Boon, Marlette R.; Öörni, Katariina; Rensen, Patrick C. N. (2019)
    BACKGROUND: South Asians are more prone to develop atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) compared with white Caucasians, which is not fully explained by classical risk factors. We recently reported that the presence of aggregation-prone low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the circulation is associated with increased ASCVD mortality. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that LDL of South Asians is more prone to aggregate, which may be explained by differences in their LDL lipid composition. METHODS: In this cross-sectional hypothesis-generating study, LDL was isolated from plasma of healthy South Asians (n = 12) and age- and BMI-matched white Caucasians (n = 12), and its aggregation susceptibility and lipid composition were analyzed. RESULTS: LDL from South Asians was markedly more prone to aggregate compared with white Caucasians. Among all measured lipids, sphingomyelin 24:0 and triacylglycerol 56:8 showed the highest positive correlation with LDL aggregation. In addition, LDL from South Asians was enriched in arachidonic acid containing phosphatidylcholine 38:4 and had less phosphatidylcholines and cholesteryl esters containing monounsaturated fatty acids. Interestingly, body fat percentage, which was higher in South Asians (+26%), positively correlated with LDL aggregation and highly positively correlated with triacylglycerol 56:8, sphingomyelin 24:0, and total sphingomyelin. CONCLUSIONS: LDL aggregation susceptibility is higher in healthy young South Asians compared with white Caucasians. This may be partly explained by the higher body fat percentage of South Asians, leading to sphingomyelin enrichment of LDL. We anticipate that the presence of sphingomyelin-rich, aggregation -prone LDL particles in young South Asians may increase LDL accumulation in the arterial wall and thereby contribute to their increased risk of developing ASCVD later in life. (C) 2019 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Sliz, Eeva; Kettunen, Johannes; Holmes, Michael V.; Williams, Clare Oliver; Boachie, Charles; Wang, Qin; Maennikkoe, Minna; Sebert, Sylvain; Walters, Robin; Lin, Kuang; Millwood, Iona Y.; Clarke, Robert; Li, Liming; Rankin, Naomi; Welsh, Paul; Delles, Christian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Jaervelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chen, Zhengming; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Danesh, John; Davey Smith, George; Sattar, Naveed; Butterworth, Adam; Würtz, Peter (2018)
    Background: Both statins and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors lower blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels to reduce risk of cardiovascular events. To assess potential differences between metabolic effects of these 2 lipid-lowering therapies, we performed detailed lipid and metabolite profiling of a large randomized statin trial and compared the results with the effects of genetic inhibition of PCSK9, acting as a naturally occurring trial. Methods: Two hundred twenty-eight circulating metabolic measures were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, including lipoprotein subclass concentrations and their lipid composition, fatty acids, and amino acids, for 5359 individuals (2659 on treatment) in the PROSPER (Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk) trial at 6 months postrandomization. The corresponding metabolic measures were analyzed in 8 population cohorts (N=72 185) using PCSK9 rs11591147 as an unconfounded proxy to mimic the therapeutic effects of PCSK9 inhibitors. Results: Scaled to an equivalent lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the effects of genetic inhibition of PCSK9 on 228 metabolic markers were generally consistent with those of statin therapy (R-2=0.88). Alterations in lipoprotein lipid composition and fatty acid distribution were similar. However, discrepancies were observed for very-low-density lipoprotein lipid measures. For instance, genetic inhibition of PCSK9 had weaker effects on lowering of very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared with statin therapy (54% versus 77% reduction, relative to the lowering effect on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; P=2x10(-7) for heterogeneity). Genetic inhibition of PCSK9 showed no significant effects on amino acids, ketones, or a marker of inflammation (GlycA), whereas statin treatment weakly lowered GlycA levels. Conclusions: Genetic inhibition of PCSK9 had similar metabolic effects to statin therapy on detailed lipid and metabolite profiles. However, PCSK9 inhibitors are predicted to have weaker effects on very-low-density lipoprotein lipids compared with statins for an equivalent lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which potentially translate into smaller reductions in cardiovascular disease risk.
  • Lehti, Satu; Käkelä, Reijo; Horkko, Sohvi; Kummu, Outi; Helske-Suihko, Satu; Kupari, Markku; Werkkala, Kalervo; Kovanen, Petri T.; Öörni, Katariina (2013)
  • Ruotsalainen, Anna-Kaisa; Lappalainen, Jari P.; Heiskanen, Emmi; Merentie, Mari; Sihvola, Virve; Näpänkangas, Juha; Lottonen-Raikaslehto, Line; Kansanen, Emilia; Adinolfi, Simone; Kaarniranta, Kai; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Jauhiainen, Matti; Pirinen, Eija; Levonen, Anna-Liisa (2019)
    Aims Oxidative stress and inflammation play an important role in the progression of atherosclerosis. Transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in the vessel wall, but paradoxically, global loss of Nrf2 in apoE deficient mice alleviates atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of global Nrf2 deficiency on early and advanced atherogenesis in alternative models of atherosclerosis, LDL receptor deficient mice (LDLR-/-), and LDLR-/- mice expressing apoB-100 only (LDLR-/- ApoB(100/100)) having a humanized lipoprotein profile. Methods and results LDLR-/- mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 or 12weeks and LDLR(-/-)ApoB(100/100) mice a regular chow diet for 6 or 12months. Nrf2 deficiency significantly reduced early and more advanced atherosclerosis assessed by lesion size and coverage in the aorta in both models. Nrf2 deficiency in LDLR-/- mice reduced total plasma cholesterol after 6weeks of HFD and triglycerides in LDLR(-/-)ApoB(100/100) mice on a chow diet. Nrf2 deficiency aggravated aortic plaque maturation in aged LDLR(-/-)ApoB(100/100) mice as it increased plaque calcification. Moreover, approximate to 36% of Nrf2(-/-)LDLR(-/-)ApoB(100/100) females developed spontaneous myocardial infarction (MI) or sudden death at 5 to 12months of age. Interestingly, Nrf2 deficiency increased plaque instability index, enhanced plaque inflammation and calcification, and reduced fibrous cap thickness in brachiocephalic arteries of LDLR(-/-)ApoB(100/100) female mice at age of 12months. Conclusions Absence of Nrf2 reduced atherosclerotic lesion size in both atherosclerosis models, likely via systemic effects on lipid metabolism. However, Nrf2 deficiency in aged LDLR(-/-)ApoB(100/100) mice led to an enhanced atherosclerotic plaque instability likely via increased plaque inflammation and oxidative stress, which possibly predisposed to MI and sudden death.
  • Takahashi, Kohta; Kanerva, Kristiina; Vanharanta, Lauri; Almeida-Souza, Leonardo; Lietha, Daniel; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Ikonen, Elina (2021)
    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol delivery from late endosomes to the plasma membrane regulates focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration, but the mechanisms controlling it are poorly characterized. Here, we employed auxin-inducible rapid degradation of oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 2 (ORP2/OSBPL2) to show that endogenous ORP2 mediates the transfer of LDL-derived cholesterol from late endosomes to focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-/integrin-positive recycling endosomes in human cells. In vitro, cholesterol enhances membrane association of FAK to PI(4,5)P-2-containing lipid bilayers. In cells, ORP2 stimulates FAK activation and PI(4,5)P-2 generation in endomembranes, enhancing cell adhesion. Moreover, ORP2 increases PI(4,5)P-2 in NPC1-containing late endosomes in a FAK-dependent manner, controlling their tubulovesicular trafficking. Together, these results provide evidence that ORP2 controls FAK activation and LDL-cholesterol plasma membrane delivery by promoting bidirectional cholesterol/PI(4,5)P-2 exchange between late and recycling endosomes.
  • Adiels, Martin; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Björnson, Elias; Andersson, Linda; Matikainen, Niina; Söderlund, Sanni; Kahri, Juhani; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Nina; Sihlbom, Carina; Thorsell, Annika; Zhou, Haihong; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Packard, Chris; Boren, Jan (2019)
    Aims To investigate how apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) metabolism is altered in subjects with type 2 diabetes, whether the perturbed plasma triglyceride concentrations in this condition are determined primarily by the secretion rate or the removal rate of apoC-III, and whether improvement of glycaemic control using the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue liraglutide for 16 weeks modifies apoC-III dynamics. Materials and Methods Postprandial apoC-III kinetics were assessed after a bolus injection of [5,5,5-H-2(3)]leucine using ultrasensitive mass spectrometry techniques. We compared apoC-III kinetics in two situations: in subjects with type 2 diabetes before and after liraglutide therapy, and in type 2 diabetic subjects with matched body mass index (BMI) non-diabetic subjects. Liver fat content, subcutaneous abdominal and intra-abdominal fat were determined using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results Improved glycaemic control by liraglutide therapy for 16 weeks significantly reduced apoC-III secretion rate (561 +/- 198 vs. 652 +/- 196 mg/d, P = 0.03) and apoC-III levels (10.0 +/- 3.8 vs. 11.7 +/- 4.3 mg/dL, P = 0.035) in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Change in apoC-III secretion rate was significantly associated with the improvement in indices of glucose control (r = 0.67; P = 0.009) and change in triglyceride area under the curve (r = 0.59; P = 0.025). In line with this, the apoC-III secretion rate was higher in subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with BMI-matched non-diabetic subjects (676 +/- 208 vs. 505 +/- 174 mg/d, P = 0.042). Conclusions The results reveal that the secretion rate of apoC-III is associated with elevation of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in subjects with type 2 diabetes, potentially through the influence of glucose homeostasis on the production of apoC-III.