Browsing by Subject "Lipoproteins"

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  • Ohukainen, Pauli; Kuusisto, Sanna; Kettunen, Johannes; Perola, Markus; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Makinen, Ville-Petteri; Ala-Korpela, Mika (2020)
    Background and aims: Population subgrouping has been suggested as means to improve coronary heart disease (CHD) risk assessment. We explored here how unsupervised data-driven metabolic subgrouping, based on comprehensive lipoprotein subclass data, would work in large-scale population cohorts. Methods: We applied a self-organizing map (SOM) artificial intelligence methodology to define subgroups based on detailed lipoprotein profiles in a population-based cohort (n = 5789) and utilised the trained SOM in an independent cohort (n = 7607). We identified four SOM-based subgroups of individuals with distinct lipoprotein profiles and CHD risk and compared those to univariate subgrouping by apolipoprotein B quartiles. Results: The SOM-based subgroup with highest concentrations for non-HDL measures had the highest, and the subgroup with lowest concentrations, the lowest risk for CHD. However, apolipoprotein B quartiles produced better resolution of risk than the SOM-based subgroups and also striking dose-response behaviour. Conclusions: These results suggest that the majority of lipoprotein-mediated CHD risk is explained by apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particles. Therefore, even advanced multivariate subgrouping, with comprehensive data on lipoprotein metabolism, may not advance CHD risk assessment
  • Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Packard, Chris J.; Boren, Jan (2019)
    Purpose of ReviewApolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) is known to inhibit lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and function as an important regulator of triglyceride metabolism. In addition, apoC-III has also more recently been identified as an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which apoC-III induces hypertriglyceridemia and promotes atherogenesis, as well as the findings from recent clinical trials using novel strategies for lowering apoC-III.Recent FindingsGenetic studies have identified subjects with heterozygote loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in APOC3, the gene coding for apoC-III. Clinical characterization of these individuals shows that the LOF variants associate with a low-risk lipoprotein profile, in particular reduced plasma triglycerides. Recent results also show that complete deficiency of apoC-III is not a lethal mutation and is associated with very rapid lipolysis of plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL). Ongoing trials based on emerging gene-silencing technologies show that intervention markedly lowers apoC-III levels and, consequently, plasma triglyceride. Unexpectedly, the evidence points to apoC-III not only inhibiting LPL activity but also suppressing removal of TRLs by LPL-independent pathways.SummaryAvailable data clearly show that apoC-III is an important cardiovascular risk factor and that lifelong deficiency of apoC-III is cardioprotective. Novel therapies have been developed, and results from recent clinical trials indicate that effective reduction of plasma triglycerides by inhibition of apoC-III might be a promising strategy in management of severe hypertriglyceridemia and, more generally, a novel approach to CHD prevention in those with elevated plasma triglyceride.
  • Bhalke, Monika (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    Lipoproteins are biochemical carriers of the insoluble lipids. They are complexes combining lipids and proteins for the transport of lipids. Amongst the type of lipoproteins are low-density lipoproteins (LDL) which are prevalent in various diseases such as obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and other cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) that are essential components of lipid metabolism and play a significant role in the human diet. Omega-3 PUFAs such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are derived from fish and are necessary for proper cardiovascular functioning. Because the human body is unable to produce enough quantities of some omega-3, diet is an important source for its availability. When a diet is rich in saturated fats, the above-mentioned diseases transpire. This study investigated how consumption of two fish diets, Lean fish and Fatty fish, influence the lipid species of human LDL particles. The lipid species analysed in this study are phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine (PC), sphingomyelin (SM), and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), and cholesteryl esters (CE), and triacylglycerols (TAG). A total of 42 volunteers with a history of impaired fasting glucose had randomly been divided into two groups: fatty fish (4 fish meals/week) and lean fish (4 fish meals/week) for 12 weeks. Blood samples had been collected from the volunteers before and after consumption of the fish meals and LDL particles had been isolated from the blood samples by ultracentrifugation. In this study, the lipids were extracted by Folch method, and the extracted lipids were analysed using Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The lipid class profile did not change due to the two fish type diets. However, the consumption of fatty fish diet increased the levels of lipid species of PC, LPC, and CE containing EPA and DHA acyl chains, while decreasing levels of several TAG species. Lean fish induced minor changes in the lipid composition of LDL particles. Based on these results, fatty fish diet alters the plasma LDL lipidome profile with changes induced to both the surface and the core composition of the LDL particles in a positive way regarding cardiovascular health.
  • Hilvo, Mika; Simolin, Helena; Metso, Jari; Ruuth, Maija; Öörni, Katariina; Jauhiainen, Matti; Laaksonen, Reijo; Baruch, Amos (2018)
    Background and aims: While inhibition of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is known to result in dramatic lowering of LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), it is poorly understood how it affects other lipid species and their metabolism. The aim of this study was to characterize the alterations in the lipidome of plasma and lipoprotein particles after administration of PCSK9 inhibiting antibody to patients with established coronary heart disease. Methods: Plasma samples were obtained from patients undergoing a randomized placebo-controlled phase II trial (EQUATOR) for the safe and effective use of RG7652, a fully human monoclonal antibody inhibiting PCSK9 function. Lipoprotein fractions were isolated by sequential density ultracentrifugation, and both plasma and major lipoprotein classes (VLDL-IDL, LDL, HDL) were subjected to mass spectrometric lipidomic profiling. Results: PCSK9 inhibition significantly decreased plasma levels of several lipid classes, including sphingolipids (dihydroceramides, glucosylceramides, sphingomyelins, ceramides), cholesteryl esters and free cholesterol. Previously established ceramide ratios predicting cardiovascular mortality, or inflammation related eicosanoid lipids, were not altered. RG7652 treatment also affected the overall and relative distribution of lipids in lipoprotein classes. An overall decrease of total lipid species was observed in LDL and VLDL thorn IDL particles, while HDL-associated phospholipids increased. Following the treatment, LDL displayed reduced lipid cargo, whereas relative lipid proportions of the VLDL thorn IDL particles were mostly unchanged, and there were relatively more lipids carried in the HDL particles. Conclusions: Administration of PCSK9 antibody significantly alters the lipid composition of plasma and lipoprotein particles. These changes further shed light on the link between anti-PCSK9 therapies and cardiovascular risk. (C) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Multia, Evgen; Sirén, Heli; Andersson, Karl; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Forssén, Patrik; Fornstedt, Torgny; Öörni, Katariina; Jauhiainen, Matti; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa (2017)
    Two complementary instrumental techniques were used, and the data generated was processed with advanced numerical tools to investigate the interactions between anti-human apoB-100 monoclonal antibody (anti-apoB-100 Mab) and apoB-100 containing lipoproteins. Partial Filling Affinity Capillary Electrophoresis (PF-ACE) combined with Adsorption Energy Distribution (AED) calculations provided information on the heterogeneity of the interactions without any a priori model assumptions. The AED calculations evidenced a homogenous binding site distribution for the interactions. Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) studies were used to evaluate thermodynamics and kinetics of the Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) and anti-apoB-100 Mab interactions. High affinity and selectivity were observed, and the emerging data sets were analysed with so called Interaction Maps. In thermodynamic studies, the interaction between LDL and anti-apoB-100 Mab was found to be predominantly enthalpy driven. Both techniques were also used to study antibody interactions with Intermediate-Density (IDL) and Very Low Density (VLDL) Lipoproteins. By screening affinity constants for IDL-VLDL sample in a single injection we were able to distinguish affinity constants for both subpopulations using the numerical Interaction Map tool. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Boren, Jan (2016)
    ApoC-III was discovered almost 50 years ago, but for many years, it did not attract much attention. However, as epidemiological and Mendelian randomization studies have associated apoC-III with low levels of triglycerides and decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), it has emerged as a novel and potentially powerful therapeutic approach to managing dyslipidemia and CVD risk. The atherogenicity of apoC-III has been attributed to both direct lipoprotein lipase-mediated mechanisms and indirect mechanisms, such as promoting secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs), provoking proinflammatory responses in vascular cells and impairing LPL-independent hepatic clearance of TRL remnants. Encouraging results from clinical trials using antisense oligonucleotide, which selectively inhibits apoC-III, indicate that modulating apoC-III may be a potent therapeutic approach to managing dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease risk.