Browsing by Subject "Low-grade inflammation"

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  • Ahola, Aila J.; Saraheimo, Markku; Freese, Riitta; Forsblom, Carol; Mäkimattila, Sari; Groop, Per-Henrik; FinnDiane Study Grp (2017)
    Aims: Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Diet, as a modifiable risk factor, may in turn impact systemic inflammation. We therefore assessed whether adherence to the dietary recommendations is associated with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations in type 1 diabetes. Methods: Cross-sectional data from 677 FinnDiane study participants (48% men, mean +/- standard deviation age 46 +/- 13 years) were included. Dietary intake was assessed with a self-administered questionnaire. A diet score, with higher values denoting better adherence to the recommendations, was calculated. Serum hs-CRP concentration was measured, and individuals with hs-CRP <1.0 mg/l, and hs-CRP > 3.0 but <10.0 mg/l were compared. Results: Men and women with high hs-CRP had higher BMI, waist circumference, and triglyceride concentration, but lower HDL-cholesterol concentration. Adjusted for BMI, mean diet score was higher in the low hs-CRP group, both in men (10.8 +/- 3.6 vs. 9.9 +/- 3.8, p = 0.023) and women (12.7 +/- 3.4 vs. 11.6 +/- 3.5, p = 0.021). After further adjustments with potential confounding factors, the difference remained significant only in men. Conclusions: A diet that more closely adheres to the dietary recommendations is associated with lower hs-CRP in men. A prudent diet may help reduce systemic inflammation in type 1 diabetes. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Peuhkuri, Katri; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Korpela, Riitta (2011)
  • Huhtala, Mikael S.; Tertti, Kristiina; Juhila, Juuso; Sorsa, Timo; Rönnemaa, Tapani (2020)
    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is characterized by disturbed glucose metabolism and activation of low-grade inflammation. We studied whether metformin treatment has favorable or unfavorable effects on inflammatory markers and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1) in GDM patients compared with insulin, and whether these markers associate with major maternal or fetal clinical outcomes. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of a previous randomized controlled trial comparing metformin (n = 110) and insulin (n = 107) treatment of GDM. Fasting serum samples were collected at the time of diagnosis (baseline, mean 30 gestational weeks [gw]) and at 36 gw. Inflammatory markers serum high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) and glycoprotein acetylation (GlycA) as well as three IGFBP-1 phosphoisoform concentrations were determined. Results: In the metformin and insulin groups combined, hsCRP decreased (p = 0.01), whereas IL-6 (p = 0.002), GlycA (p <0.0001) and all IGFBP-1 phosphoisoforms (p <0.0001) increased from baseline to 36 gw. GlycA (p = 0.02) and non-phosphorylated IGFBP-1 (p = 0.008) increased more in patients treated with metformin than those treated with insulin. Inflammatory markers did not clearly associate with pregnancy outcomes but non-phosphorylated IGFBP-1 was inversely associated with gestational weight gain. Conclusions: Metformin had beneficial effects on maternal serum IGFBP-1 concentrations compared to insulin, as increased IGFBP-1 related to lower total and late pregnancy maternal weight gain. GlycA increased more during metformin treatment compared to insulin. The significance of this observation needs to be more profoundly examined in further studies. There were no evident clinically relevant relations between inflammatory markers and pregnancy outcome measures.
  • Huhtala, Mikael S; Tertti, Kristiina; Juhila, Juuso; Sorsa, Timo; Rönnemaa, Tapani (BioMed Central, 2020)
    Abstract Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is characterized by disturbed glucose metabolism and activation of low-grade inflammation. We studied whether metformin treatment has favorable or unfavorable effects on inflammatory markers and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1) in GDM patients compared with insulin, and whether these markers associate with major maternal or fetal clinical outcomes. Methods This is a secondary analysis of a previous randomized controlled trial comparing metformin (n = 110) and insulin (n = 107) treatment of GDM. Fasting serum samples were collected at the time of diagnosis (baseline, mean 30 gestational weeks [gw]) and at 36 gw. Inflammatory markers serum high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) and glycoprotein acetylation (GlycA) as well as three IGFBP-1 phosphoisoform concentrations were determined. Results In the metformin and insulin groups combined, hsCRP decreased (p = 0.01), whereas IL-6 (p = 0.002), GlycA (p < 0.0001) and all IGFBP-1 phosphoisoforms (p < 0.0001) increased from baseline to 36 gw. GlycA (p = 0.02) and non-phosphorylated IGFBP-1 (p = 0.008) increased more in patients treated with metformin than those treated with insulin. Inflammatory markers did not clearly associate with pregnancy outcomes but non-phosphorylated IGFBP-1 was inversely associated with gestational weight gain. Conclusions Metformin had beneficial effects on maternal serum IGFBP-1 concentrations compared to insulin, as increased IGFBP-1 related to lower total and late pregnancy maternal weight gain. GlycA increased more during metformin treatment compared to insulin. The significance of this observation needs to be more profoundly examined in further studies. There were no evident clinically relevant relations between inflammatory markers and pregnancy outcome measures. Trial registration The trial comparing metformin and insulin treatment was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT01240785 ) November 3, 2010. Retrospectively registered.
  • Järvelä-Reijonen, Elina; Puttonen, Sampsa; Karhunen, Leila; Sairanen, Essi; Laitinen, Jaana; Kolehmainen, Mikko; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Kujala, Urho M.; Korpela, Riitta; Ermes, Miikka; Lappalainen, Raimo; Kolehmainen, Marjukka (2020)
    Background Psychological processes can be manifested in physiological health. We investigated whether acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), targeted on psychological flexibility (PF), influences inflammation and stress biomarkers among working-age adults with psychological distress and overweight/obesity. Method Participants were randomized into three parallel groups: (1) ACT-based face-to-face (n = 65; six group sessions led by a psychologist), (2) ACT-based mobile (n = 73; one group session and mobile app), and (3) control (n = 66; only the measurements). Systemic inflammation and stress markers were analyzed at baseline, at 10 weeks after the baseline (post-intervention), and at 36 weeks after the baseline (follow-up). General PF and weight-related PF were measured with questionnaires (Acceptance and Action Questionnaire, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire for Weight-Related Difficulties). Results A group x time interaction (p = .012) was detected in the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) level but not in other inflammation and stress biomarkers. hsCRP decreased significantly in the face-to-face group from week 0 to week 36, and at week 36, hsCRP was lower among the participants in the face-to-face group than in the mobile group (p = .035, post hoc test). Age and sex were stronger predictors of biomarker levels at follow-up than the post-intervention PF. Conclusion The results suggest that ACT delivered in group sessions may exert beneficial effects on low-grade systemic inflammation. More research is needed on how to best apply psychological interventions for the health of both mind and body among people with overweight/obesity and psychological distress.