Browsing by Subject "MACHINERY"

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  • Lai, Jeffrey K. F.; Sam, I-Ching; Verlhac, Pauline; Baguet, Joel; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Faure, Mathias; Chan, Yoke Fun (2017)
    Viruses have evolved unique strategies to evade or subvert autophagy machinery. Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) induces autophagy during infection in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we report that EV-A71 triggers autolysosome formation during infection in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells to facilitate its replication. Blocking autophagosome-lysosome fusion with chloroquine inhibited virus RNA replication, resulting in lower viral titres, viral RNA copies and viral proteins. Overexpression of the non-structural protein 2BC of EV-A71 induced autolysosome formation. Yeast 2-hybrid and co-affinity purification assays showed that 2BC physically and specifically interacted with a N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE) protein, syntaxin-17 (STX17). Co-immunoprecipitation assay further showed that 2BC binds to SNARE proteins, STX17 and synaptosome associated protein 29 (SNAP29). Transient knockdown of STX17, SNAP29, and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B), crucial proteins in the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes) as well as the lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) impaired production of infectious EV-A71 in RD cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the generation of autolysosomes triggered by the 2BC non-structural protein is important for EV-A71 replication, revealing a potential molecular pathway targeted by the virus to exploit autophagy. This study opens the possibility for the development of novel antivirals that specifically target 2BC to inhibit formation of autolysosomes during EV-A71 infection.
  • Wei, Ting; Najmi, Saman M.; Liu, Hester; Peltonen, Karita; Kucerova, Alena; Schneider, David A.; Laiho, Marikki (2018)
    Summary Inhibition of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is a promising strategy for modern cancer therapy. BMH-21 is a first-in-class small molecule that inhibits Pol I transcription and induces degradation of the enzyme, but how this exceptional response is enforced is not known. Here, we define key elements requisite for the response. We show that Pol I preinitiation factors and polymerase subunits (e.g., RPA135) are required for BMH-21-mediated degradation of RPA194. We further find that Pol I inhibition and induced degradation by BMH-21 are conserved in yeast. Genetic analyses demonstrate that mutations that induce transcription elongation defects in Pol I result in hypersensitivity to BMH-21. Using a fully reconstituted Pol I transcription assay, we show that BMH-21 directly impairs transcription elongation by Pol I, resulting in long-lived polymerase pausing. These studies define a conserved regulatory checkpoint that monitors Pol I transcription and is activated by therapeutic intervention.