Browsing by Subject "MAGNETIC-RESONANCE METABOLOMICS"

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  • Deelen, Joris; Kettunen, Johannes; Fischer, Krista; van der Spek, Ashley; Trompet, Stella; Kastenmueller, Gabi; Boyd, Andy; Zierer, Jonas; van den Akker, Erik B.; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Amin, Najaf; Demirkan, Ayse; Ghanbari, Mohsen; van Heemst, Diana; Ikram, M. Arfan; van Klinken, Jan Bert; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Peters, Annette; Salomaa, Veikko; Sattar, Naveed; Spector, Tim D.; Tiemeier, Henning; Verhoeven, Aswin; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wuertz, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Menni, Cristina; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Drenos, Fotios; Beekman, Marian; Jukema, J. Wouter; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Slagboom, P. Eline (2019)
    Predicting longer-term mortality risk requires collection of clinical data, which is often cumbersome. Therefore, we use a well-standardized metabolomics platform to identify metabolic predictors of long-term mortality in the circulation of 44,168 individuals (age at baseline 18-109), of whom 5512 died during follow-up. We apply a stepwise (forward-backward) procedure based on meta-analysis results and identify 14 circulating biomarkers independently associating with all-cause mortality. Overall, these associations are similar in men and women and across different age strata. We subsequently show that the prediction accuracy of 5- and 10-year mortality based on a model containing the identified biomarkers and sex (C-statistic = 0.837 and 0.830, respectively) is better than that of a model containing conventional risk factors for mortality (C-statistic = 0.772 and 0.790, respectively). The use of the identified metabolic profile as a predictor of mortality or surrogate endpoint in clinical studies needs further investigation.
  • Welsh, Paul; Rankin, Naomi; Li, Qiang; Mark, Patrick B.; Würtz, Peter; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Marre, Michel; Poulter, Neil; Hamet, Pavel; Chalmers, John; Woodward, Mark; Sattar, Naveed (2018)
    Aims/hypotheses We aimed to quantify the association of individual circulating amino acids with macrovascular disease, microvascular disease and all-cause mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Methods We performed a case-cohort study (N = 3587), including 655 macrovascular events, 342 microvascular events (new or worsening nephropathy or retinopathy) and 632 all-cause mortality events during follow-up, in a secondary analysis of the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) study. For this study, phenylalanine, isoleucine, glutamine, leucine, alanine, tyrosine, histidine and valine were measured in stored plasma samples by proton NMR metabolomics. Hazard ratios were modelled per SD increase in each amino acid. Results In models investigating associations and potential mechanisms, after adjusting for age, sex and randomised treatment, phenylalanine was positively, and histidine inversely, associated with macrovascular disease risk. These associations were attenuated to the null on further adjustment for extended classical risk factors (including eGFR and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio). After adjustment for extended classical risk factors, higher tyrosine and alanine levels were associated with decreased risk of microvascular disease (HR 0.78; 95% CI 0.67, 0.91 and HR 0.86; 95% CI 0.76, 0.98, respectively). Higher leucine (HR 0.79; 95% CI 0.69, 0.90), histidine (HR 0.89; 95% CI 0.81, 0.99) and valine (HR 0.79; 95% CI 0.70, 0.88) levels were associated with lower risk of mortality. Investigating the predictive ability of amino acids, addition of all amino acids to a risk score modestly improved classification of participants for macrovascular (continuous net reclassification index [NRI] +35.5%, p <0.001) and microvascular events (continuous NRI +14.4%, p = 0.012). Conclusions/interpretation We report distinct associations between circulating amino acids and risk of different major complications of diabetes. Low tyrosine appears to be a marker of microvascular risk in individuals with type 2 diabetes independently of fundamental markers of kidney function.
  • Barrios, Clara; Zierer, Jonas; Würtz, Peter; Haller, Toomas; Metspalu, Andres; Gieger, Christian; Thorand, Barbara; Meisinger, Christa; Waldenberger, Melanie; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Otero, Sol; Rodriguez, Eva; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Kähönen, Mika; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Spector, Tim D.; Pascual, Julio; Menni, Cristina (2018)
    Using targeted NMR spectroscopy of 227 fasting serum metabolic traits, we searched for novel metabolic signatures of renal function in 926 type 2 diabetics (T2D) and 4838 non-diabetic individuals from four independent cohorts. We furthermore investigated longitudinal changes of metabolic measures and renal function and associations with other T2D microvascular complications. 142 traits correlated with glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after adjusting for confounders and multiple testing: 59 in diabetics, 109 in non-diabetics with 26 overlapping. The amino acids glycine and phenylalanine and the energy metabolites citrate and glycerol were negatively associated with eGFR in all the cohorts, while alanine, valine and pyruvate depicted opposite association in diabetics (positive) and nondiabetics (negative). Moreover, in all cohorts, the triglyceride content of different lipoprotein subclasses showed a negative association with eGFR, while cholesterol, cholesterol esters (CE), and phospholipids in HDL were associated with better renal function. In contrast, phospholipids and CEs in LDL showed positive associations with eGFR only in T2D, while phospholipid content in HDL was positively associated with eGFR both cross-sectionally and longitudinally only in non-diabetics. In conclusion, we provide a wide list of kidney function-associated metabolic traits and identified novel metabolic differences between diabetic and non-diabetic kidney disease.
  • Kuusisto, Sanna; Holmes, Michael; Ohukainen, Pauli; Kangas, Antti J.; Karsikas, Mari; Tiainen, Mika; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Kettunen, Johannes; Ala-Korpela, Mika (2019)
    BACKGROUND: HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux capacity (HDL-CEC) is a functional attribute that may have a protective role in atherogenesis. However, the estimation of HDL-CEC is based on in vitro cell assays that are laborious and hamper large-scale phenotyping. METHODS: Here, we present a cost-effective high-throughput nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method to estimate HDL-CEC directly from serum. We applied the new method in a population-based study of 7603 individuals including 574 who developed incident coronary heart disease (CHD) during 15 years of follow-up, making this the largest quantitative study for HDL-CEC. RESULTS: As estimated by NMR-spectroscopy, a 1-SD higher HDL-CEC was associated with a lower risk of incident CHD (hazards ratio, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.79-0.93, adjusted for traditional risk factors and HDL-C). These findings are consistent with published associations based on in vitro cell assays. CONCLUSIONS: These corroborative large-scale findings provide further support for a potential protective role of HDL-CEC in CHD and substantiate this new method and its future applications. (C) 2019 American Association for Clinical Chemistry
  • Kettunen, Johannes; Holmes, Michael V.; Allara, Elias; Anufrieva, Olga; Ohukainen, Pauli; Oliver-Williams, Clare; Wang, Qin; Tillin, Therese; Hughes, Alun D.; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma; Raitakari, Olli T.; Salomaa, Veikko; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Perola, Markus; Smith, George Davey; Chaturvedi, Nish; Danesh, John; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Butterworth, Adam S.; Ala-Korpela, Mika (2019)
    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibition reduces vascular event risk, but confusion surrounds its effects on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Here, we clarify associations of genetic inhibition of CETP on detailed lipoprotein measures and compare those to genetic inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR). We used an allele associated with lower CETP expression (rs247617) to mimic CETP inhibition and an allele associated with lower HMGCR expression (rs12916) to mimic the well-known effects of statins for comparison. The study consists of 65,427 participants of European ancestries with detailed lipoprotein subclass profiling from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Genetic associations were scaled to 10% reduction in relative risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We also examined observational associations of the lipoprotein subclass measures with risk of incident CHD in 3 population-based cohorts totalling 616 incident cases and 13,564 controls during 8-year follow-up. Genetic inhibition of CETP and HMGCR resulted in near-identical associations with LDL cholesterol concentration estimated by the Friedewald equation. Inhibition of HMGCR had relatively consistent associations on lower cholesterol concentrations across all apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. In contrast, the associations of the inhibition of CETP were stronger on lower remnant and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, but there were no associations on cholesterol concentrations in LDL defined by particle size (diameter 18-26 nm) (-0.02 SD LDL defined by particle size; 95% CI: -0.10 to 0.05 for CETP versus -0.24 SD, 95% CI -0.30 to -0.18 for HMGCR). Inhibition of CETP was strongly associated with lower proportion of triglycerides in all high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. In observational analyses, a higher triglyceride composition within HDL subclasses was associated with higher risk of CHD, independently of total cholesterol and triglycerides (strongest hazard ratio per 1 SD higher triglyceride composition in very large HDL 1.35; 95% CI: 1.18-1.54). In conclusion, CETP inhibition does not appear to affect size-specific LDL cholesterol but is likely to lower CHD risk by lowering concentrations of other atherogenic, apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins (such as remnant and VLDLs). Inhibition of CETP also lowers triglyceride composition in HDL particles, a phenomenon reflecting combined effects of circulating HDL, triglycerides, and apolipoprotein B-containing particles and is associated with a lower CHD risk in observational analyses. Our results reveal that conventional composite lipid assays may mask heterogeneous effects of emerging lipid-altering therapies.
  • Sliz, Eeva; Kettunen, Johannes; Holmes, Michael V.; Williams, Clare Oliver; Boachie, Charles; Wang, Qin; Maennikkoe, Minna; Sebert, Sylvain; Walters, Robin; Lin, Kuang; Millwood, Iona Y.; Clarke, Robert; Li, Liming; Rankin, Naomi; Welsh, Paul; Delles, Christian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Jaervelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chen, Zhengming; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Danesh, John; Davey Smith, George; Sattar, Naveed; Butterworth, Adam; Würtz, Peter (2018)
    Background: Both statins and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors lower blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels to reduce risk of cardiovascular events. To assess potential differences between metabolic effects of these 2 lipid-lowering therapies, we performed detailed lipid and metabolite profiling of a large randomized statin trial and compared the results with the effects of genetic inhibition of PCSK9, acting as a naturally occurring trial. Methods: Two hundred twenty-eight circulating metabolic measures were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, including lipoprotein subclass concentrations and their lipid composition, fatty acids, and amino acids, for 5359 individuals (2659 on treatment) in the PROSPER (Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk) trial at 6 months postrandomization. The corresponding metabolic measures were analyzed in 8 population cohorts (N=72 185) using PCSK9 rs11591147 as an unconfounded proxy to mimic the therapeutic effects of PCSK9 inhibitors. Results: Scaled to an equivalent lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the effects of genetic inhibition of PCSK9 on 228 metabolic markers were generally consistent with those of statin therapy (R-2=0.88). Alterations in lipoprotein lipid composition and fatty acid distribution were similar. However, discrepancies were observed for very-low-density lipoprotein lipid measures. For instance, genetic inhibition of PCSK9 had weaker effects on lowering of very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared with statin therapy (54% versus 77% reduction, relative to the lowering effect on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; P=2x10(-7) for heterogeneity). Genetic inhibition of PCSK9 showed no significant effects on amino acids, ketones, or a marker of inflammation (GlycA), whereas statin treatment weakly lowered GlycA levels. Conclusions: Genetic inhibition of PCSK9 had similar metabolic effects to statin therapy on detailed lipid and metabolite profiles. However, PCSK9 inhibitors are predicted to have weaker effects on very-low-density lipoprotein lipids compared with statins for an equivalent lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which potentially translate into smaller reductions in cardiovascular disease risk.
  • Sliz, Eeva; Sebert, Sylvain; Würtz, Peter; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Männikkö, Minna; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T.; Kettunen, Johannes (2018)
    Fatty liver has been associated with unfavourable metabolic changes in circulation. To provide insights in fatty liver-related metabolic deviations, we compared metabolic association profile of fatty liver versus metabolic association profiles of genotypes increasing the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The cross-sectional associations of ultrasound-ascertained fatty liver with 123 metabolic measures were determined in 1810 (N-fatty liver = 338) individuals aged 34-49 years from The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. The association profiles of NAFLD-risk alleles in PNPLA3, TM6SF2, GCKR, and LYPLAL1 with the corresponding metabolic measures were obtained from a publicly available metabolomics GWAS including up to 24 925 Europeans. The risk alleles showed different metabolic effects: PNPLA3 rs738409-G, the strongest genetic NAFLD risk factor, did not associate with metabolic changes. Metabolic effects of GCKR rs1260326-T were comparable in many respects to the fatty liver associations. Metabolic effects of LYPLAL1 rs12137855-C were similar, but statistically less robust, to the effects of GCKR rs1260326-T. TM6SF2 rs58542926-T displayed opposite metabolic effects when compared with the fatty liver associations. The metabolic effects of the risk alleles highlight heterogeneity of the molecular pathways leading to fatty liver and suggest that the fatty liver-related changes in the circulating lipids and metabolites may vary depending on the underlying pathophysiological mechanism. Despite the robust cross-sectional associations on population level, the present results showing neutral or cardioprotective metabolic effects for some of the NAFLD risk alleles advocate that hepatic lipid accumulation by itself may not increase the level of circulating lipids or other metabolites.