Browsing by Subject "MAGNIFIER"

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  • Franchin, Alessandro; Downard, Andy; Kangasluoma, Juha; Nieminen, Tuomo; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Steiner, Gerhard; Manninen, Hanna E.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Flagan, Richard C.; Kulmala, Markku (2016)
    Reliable and reproducible measurements of atmospheric aerosol particle number size distributions below 10 nm require optimized classification instruments with high particle transmission efficiency. Almost all differential mobility analyzers (DMAs) have an unfavorable potential gradient at the outlet (e.g., long column, Vienna type) or at the inlet (nano-radial DMA), preventing them from achieving a good transmission efficiency for the smallest nanoparticles. We developed a new high-transmission inlet for the Caltech nano-radial DMA (nRDMA) that increases the transmission efficiency to 12% for ions as small as 1.3 nm in Millikan-Fuchs mobility equivalent diameter, D-p (corresponding to 1.2 x 10(-4) m(2) V-1 s(-1) in electrical mobility). We successfully deployed the nRDMA, equipped with the new inlet, in chamber measurements, using a particle size magnifier (PSM) and as a booster a condensation particle counter (CPC). With this setup, we were able to measure size distributions of ions within a mobility range from 1.2 x 10(-4) to 5.8 x 10(-6) m(2) V-1 s(-1). The system was modeled, tested in the laboratory and used to measure negative ions at ambient concentrations in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) 7 measurement campaign at CERN. We achieved a higher size resolution (R = 5.5 at D-p = 1.47 nm) than techniques currently used in field measurements (e.g., Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS), which has a R similar to 2 at largest sizes, and R similar to 1.8 at D-p = 1.5 nm) and maintained a good total transmission efficiency (6.3% at D-p = 1.5 nm) at moderate inlet and sheath airflows (2.5 and 30 L min(-1), respectively). In this paper, by measuring size distributions at high size resolution down to 1.3 nm, we extend the limit of the current technology. The current setup is limited to ion measurements. However, we envision that future research focused on the charging mechanisms could extend the technique to measure neutral aerosol particles as well, so that it will be possible to measure size distributions of ambient aerosols from 1 nm to 1 mu m.
  • Ahonen, L. R.; Kangasluoma, J.; Lammi, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Hämeri, K.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M. (2017)
    This study was conducted to observe a potential formation and/or release of aerosol particles related to manufacturing processes inside a cleanroom. We introduce a novel technique to monitor airborne sub 2nm particles in the cleanroom and present results from a measurement campaign during which the total particle number concentration (>1nm and >7 nm) and the size resolved concentration in the 1 to 2nm size range were measured. Measurements were carried out in locations where atomic layer deposition (ALD), sputtering, and lithography processes were conducted, with a wide variety of starting materials. During our campaign in the clean room, we observed several time periods when the particle number concentration was 10(5) cm(-3) in the sub 2nm size range and 10(4) cm(-3) in the size class larger than 7nm in one of the sampling locations. The highest concentrations were related to the maintenance processes of the manufacturing machines, which were conducted regularly in that specific location. Our measurements show that around 500cm(-3) sub 2nm particles or clusters were in practice always present in this specific cleanroom, while the concentration of particles larger than 2nm was less than 2cm(-3). During active processes, the concentrations of sub 2nm particles could rise to over 10(5) cm(-3) due to an active new particle formation. The new particle formation was most likely induced by a combination of the supersaturated vapors, released from the machines, and the very low existing condensation sink, leading to pretty high formation rates J(1.4 nm) = (9 4) cm(-3) s(-1) and growth rates of particles (GR(1.1-1.3 nm) = (6 +/- 3) nm/h and GR(1.3-1.8 nm) = (14 +/- 3) nm/h).Copyright (c) 2017 American Association for Aerosol Research
  • Kangasluoma, Juha; Ahonen, Lauri R.; Laurila, Tiia M.; Cai, Runlong; Enroth, Joonas; Mazon, Stephany Buenrostro; Korhonen, Frans; Aalto, Pasi P.; Kulmala, Markku; Attoui, Michel; Petäjä, Tuukka (2018)
    Measurement of atmospheric sub-10 nm nanoparticle number concentrations has been of substantial interest recently, which, however, is subject to considerable uncertainty. We report a laboratory characterization of a high flow differential mobility particle sizer (HFDMPS), which is based on the Half-mini type differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and nano condensation nuclei counter (A11), and show the first results from atmospheric observations. The HFDMPS utilizes the state-of-the-art aerosol technology, and is optimized for sub-10 nm particle size distribution measurements by a moderate resolution DMA, optimized and characterized low-loss particle sampling line and minimal dilution in the detector. We present an exhaustive laboratory calibration to the HFDMPS and compare the measured size data to the Hyytiala long-term DMPS and Neutral cluster and ion spectrometer. The HFDMPS detects about two times higher 3-10 nm particle concentrations than the long-term DMPS, and the counting uncertainties are halved as compared to the long-term DMPS. The HFDMPS did not observe any sub-2.5 nm particles in Hyytiala, and the reason for that was shown to be the inability of diethylene glycol to condense on such small biogenic particles. Last, we discuss the general implications of our results to the sub-10 nm DMPS based measurements.
  • Cai, Runlong; Jiang, Jingkun; Mirme, Sander; Kangasluoma, Juha (2019)
    Measuring aerosol size distributions accurately down to similar to 1 nm is a key to nucleation studies, and it requires developments and improvements in instruments such as electrical mobility spectrometers in use today. The key factors characterizing the performance of an electrical mobility spectrometer for sub-3 nm particles are discussed in this study. A parameter named as Pi is proposed as a figure of merit for the performance of an electrical mobility spectrometer in the sub-3 nm size range instead of the overall detection efficiency. Pi includes the overall detection efficiency, the measurement time in each size bin, the aerosol flow rate passing through the detector, and the aerosol-to-sheath flow ratio of the differential mobility analyzer. The particle raw count number recorded by the detector can be estimated using Pi at a given aerosol size distribution function, dN/dlogd(p)( ). The limit of detection for the spectrometer and the statistical uncertainty of the measured aerosol size distribution can also be readily estimated using Pi. In addition to Pi, the size resolution of an electrical mobility analyzer is another factor characterizing the systematic errors originated from particle sizing. Four existing electrical mobility spectrometers designed for measuring sub-3 nm aerosol size distributions, including three scanning/differential mobility particle spectrometers and one differential mobility analyzer train, are examined. Their optimal performance is evaluated using Pi and the size resolution. For example, the Pi value and the size resolution of a diethylene-glycol differential mobility particle spectrometer for 1.5 nm particles are 8.0 x 10(-4) cm(3) and 5.7, respectively. The corresponding relative uncertainty of the measured size distribution is approximately 9.6% during an atmospheric new particle formation event with a dN/dlogd(p) of 5 x 10(5) cm(-3) . Assuming an adjustable sheath flow rate of the differential mobility analyzer, the optimal size resolution is approximately 5-9 when measuring atmospheric new particle formation events.