Browsing by Subject "MALARIA"

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  • Khattab, Ayman; Jylha, Kaisa; Hakala, Tomi; Aalto, Mikko; Malima, Robert; Kisinza, William; Honkala, Markku; Nousiainen, Pertti; Meri, Seppo (2017)
    Background: Mosquitoes are vectors for many diseases such as malaria. Insecticide-treated bed nets and indoor residual spraying of insecticides are the principal malaria vector control tools used to prevent malaria in the tropics. Other interventions aim at reducing man-vector contact. For example, house screening provides additive or synergistic effects to other implemented measures. We used commercial screen materials made of polyester, polyethylene or polypropylene to design novel mosquito screens that provide remarkable additional benefits to those commonly used in house screening. The novel design is based on a double screen setup made of a screen with 3D geometric structures parallel to a commercial mosquito screen creating a trap between the two screens. Owing to the design of the 3D screen, mosquitoes can penetrate the 3D screen from one side but cannot return through the other side, making it a unidirectional mosquito screen. Therefore, the mosquitoes are trapped inside the double screen system. The permissiveness of both sides of the 3D screens for mosquitoes to pass through was tested in a wind tunnel using the insectary strain of Anopheles stephensi. Results: Among twenty- five tested 3D screen designs, three designs from the cone, prism, or cylinder design groups were the most efficient in acting as unidirectional mosquito screens. The three cone-,prism-, and cylinder-based screens allowed, on average, 92, 75 and 64% of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes released into the wind tunnel to penetrate the permissive side and 0, 0 and 6% of mosquitoes to escape through the non-permissive side, respectively. Conclusions: A cone- based 3D screen fulfilled the study objective. It allowed capturing 92% of mosquitoes within the double screen setup inside the wind tunnel and blocked 100% from escaping. Thus, the cone- based screen effectively acted as a unidirectional mosquito screen. This 3D screen-based trap design could therefore be used in house screening as a means of avoiding infective bites and reducing mosquito population size.
  • Mgbeahuruike, Eunice Ego; Holm, Yvonne; Vuorela, Heikki; Amandikwa, Chinyere; Fyhrquist, Pia (2019)
    Ethnobotanical relevance: Piper guineense occurs commonly in West Africa where it is used for fungal infections instead of the costly and not always accessible conventional antifungals. Fungal, yeast-based diseases are common in West-Africa especially among those living with HIV/AIDS, and thus this study was performed in Imo state, South-Eastern Nigeria, where P. guineense is predominantly used for the treatment of fungal diseases, such as skin rashes, oral thrush and vaginosis. Aim of study: The scarce number of previous studies on the documentation of the traditional uses of P. guineense extracts for the treatment of fungal infections in Nigeria prompted this survey. The investigation focused on how traditional healers recognize and diagnose fungal infections, how P. guineense is collected, on the various parts used for the treatments, methods of preparations, administrations and treatments. In addition, an in vitro anti fungal screening of P. guineense fruit and leaf extracts of various polarities, and piperine and piperlongumine, representing the main constituents in these extracts, were performed. Methods: A house to house ethnobotanical survey was conducted using questionnaires. Twenty traditional medical practitioners (TMP) and herb sellers from ten villages were interviewed. Four human pathogenic strains of yeast and Cryptococcus neoformans, a yeast-like basidiomycete causing meningitis in immunocompromised individuals, were used for the antifungal screening. Results: The traditional medical practitioners (TMP) and herb sellers explained that the leaves and fruits are the most commonly used plant parts for the treatments. The oral intake of the extracts in locally produced bamboo alcohol (Kai-kai) is the most common method of administration. In accordance with these recorded traditional uses, we found that extracts of P. guineense were growth inhibitory against the fungal strains with MIC values ranging from 39 to 2500 g/mL. The lowest MIC value of 39 g/mL was recorded for a methanol fruit extract against Candida albicans, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. In addition, ethanol and hexane fruit extracts were effective against the growth of C. albicans and C. glabrata, respectively, with a MIC of 78 g/mL. Piperlongumine and piperine were active against C. albicans with MIC values of 39 and 78 g/mL respectively. Conclusion: P. guineense fruit and leaf extracts, as well as their piperamide alkaloid constituents piperine and piperlongumine, have interesting antifungal properties and could have potential as new antifungal scaffolds. Our results warrant further in-depth investigations to isolate and characterize piperamide alkaloids and other compounds responsible for the antifungal activity in the extracts.
  • Pett, Helmi; Bradley, John; Okebe, Joseph; Dicko, Alassane; Tiono, Alfred B.; Goncalves, Bronner P.; Stone, Will; Chen, Ingrid; Lanke, Kjerstin; Neuvonen, Mikko; Mustaniemi, Anna-Liina; Eziefula, Alice C.; Gosling, Roly; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Drakeley, Chris; Niemi, Mikko; Bousema, Teun (2019)
    Single-dose primaquine (PQ) clears mature gametocytes and reduces the transmission of Plasmodium fakiparurn after artemisinin combination therapy. Genetic variation in CYP2D6, the gene producing the drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6), influences plasma concentrations of PQ and its metabolites and is associated with PQ treatment failure in Plasmodium vivax malaria. Using blood and saliva samples of varying quantity and quality from 8 clinical trials across Africa (n = 1,076), we were able to genotype CYP2D6 for 774 samples (72%). We determined whether genetic variation in CYP2D6 has implications for PQ efficacy in individuals with gametocytes at the time of PQ administration (n = 554) and for safety in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient individuals treated with PQ (n = 110). Individuals with a genetically inferred CYP2D6 poor/intermediate metabolizer status had a higher gametocyte prevalence on day 7 or 10 after PQ than those with an extensive/ultrarapid CYP2D6 metabolizer status (odds ratio [OR] = 1.79 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.10, 2.90]; P = 0.018). The mean minimum hemoglobin concentrations during follow-up for G6PD-deficient individuals were 11.8 g/dl for CYP2D6 extensive/ultrarapid metabolizers and 12.1 g/dl for CYP2D6 poor/intermediate metabolizers (P = 0. 803). CYP2D6 genetically inferred metabolizer status was also not associated with anemia following PQ treatment (P = 0.331). We conclude that CYP2D6 poor/intermediate metabolizer status may be associated with prolonged gametocyte carriage after treatment with single-low-dose PQ but not with treatment safety.