Browsing by Subject "MALE-INFERTILITY"

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  • Pausch, Hubert; Venhoranta, Heli; Wurmser, Christine; Hakala, Kalle; Iso-Touru, Terhi; Sironen, Anu; Vingborg, Rikke K.; Lohi, Hannes; Soderquist, Lennart; Fries, Ruedi; Andersson, Magnus (2016)
    Background: Artificial insemination is widely used in many cattle breeding programs. Semen samples of breeding bulls are collected and closely examined immediately after collection at artificial insemination centers. Only ejaculates without anomalous findings are retained for artificial insemination. Although morphological aberrations of the spermatozoa are a frequent reason for discarding ejaculates, the genetic determinants underlying poor semen quality are scarcely understood. Results: A tail stump sperm defect was observed in three bulls of the Swedish Red cattle breed. The spermatozoa of affected bulls were immotile because of severely disorganized tails indicating disturbed spermatogenesis. We genotyped three affected bulls and 18 unaffected male half-sibs at 46,035 SNPs and performed homozygosity mapping to map the fertility disorder to an 8.42 Mb interval on bovine chromosome 13. The analysis of whole-genome re-sequencing data of an affected bull and 300 unaffected animals from eleven cattle breeds other than Swedish Red revealed a 1 bp deletion (Chr13: 24,301,425 bp, ss1815612719) in the eleventh exon of the armadillo repeat containing 3-encoding gene (ARMC3) that was compatible with the supposed recessive mode of inheritance. The deletion is expected to alter the reading frame and to induce premature translation termination (p.A451fs26). The mutated protein is shortened by 401 amino acids (46 %) and lacks domains that are likely essential for normal protein function. Conclusions: We report the phenotypic and genetic characterization of a sterilizing tail stump sperm defect in the Swedish Red cattle breed. Exploiting high-density genotypes and massive re-sequencing data enabled us to identify the most likely causal mutation for the fertility disorder in bovine ARMC3. Our results provide the basis for monitoring the mutated variant in the Swedish Red cattle population and for the early identification of infertile animals.
  • Wedenoja, Satu; Khamaysi, Ahlam; Shimshilashvili, Liana; Anbtawe-Jomaa, Shireen; Elomaa, Outi; Toppari, Jorma; Hoglund, Pia; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Holmberg, Christer; Hovatta, Outi; Tapanainen, Juha S.; Ohana, Ehud; Kere, Juha (2017)
    Chloride absorption and bicarbonate excretion through exchange by the solute carrier family 26 member 3 (SLC26A3) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are crucial for many tissues including sperm and epithelia of the male reproductive tract. Homozygous SLC26A3 mutations cause congenital chloride diarrhea with male subfertility, while homozygous CFTR mutations cause cystic fibrosis with male infertility. Some homozygous or heterozygous CFTR mutations only manifest as male infertility. Accordingly, we studied the influence of SLC26A3 on idiopathic infertility by sequencing exons of SLC26A3 in 283 infertile and 211 control men. A heterozygous mutation c.2062 G > C (p. Asp688His) appeared in nine (3.2%) infertile men, and additionally, in two (0.9%) control men, whose samples revealed a sperm motility defect. The p. Asp688His mutation is localized in the CFTR-interacting STAS domain of SLC26A3 and enriched in Finland, showing a significant association with male infertility in comparison with 6,572 Finnish (P <0.05) and over 120,000 global alleles (P <0.0001) (ExAC database). Functional studies showed that while SLC26A3 is a strong activator of CFTR- dependent anion transport, SLC26A3-p. Asp688His mutant retains normal Cl-/HCO3- exchange activity but suppresses CFTR, despite unaffected domain binding and expression. These results suggest a novel mechanism for human male infertility-impaired anion transport by the coupled SLC26A3 and CFTR.
  • Iso-Touru, Terhi; Wurmser, Christine; Venhoranta, Heli; Hiltpold, Maya; Savolainen, Tujia; Sironen, Anu; Fischer, Konrad; Flisikowski, Krzysztof; Fries, Ruedi; Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel; Nagy, Szabolcs; Mutikainen, Mervi; Peippo, Jaana; Taponen, Juhani; Sahana, Goutam; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Simonen, Henri; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Andersson, Magnus; Pausch, Hubert (2019)
    Background: Cattle populations are highly amenable to the genetic mapping of male reproductive traits because longitudinal data on ejaculate quality and dense microarray-derived genotypes are available for thousands of artificial insemination bulls. Two young Nordic Red bulls delivered sperm with low progressive motility (i.e., asthenospermia) during a semen collection period of more than four months. The bulls were related through a common ancestor on both their paternal and maternal ancestry. Thus, a recessive mode of inheritance of asthenospermia was suspected. Results: Both bulls were genotyped at 54,001 SNPs using the Illumina BovineSNP50 Bead chip. A scan for autozygosity revealed that they were identical by descent for a 2.98Mb segment located on bovine chromosome 25. This haplotype was not found in the homozygous state in 8557 fertile bulls although five homozygous haplotype carriers were expected (P=0.018). Whole genome-sequencing uncovered that both asthenospermic bulls were homozygous for a mutation that disrupts a canonical 5 splice donor site of CCDC189 encoding the coiled-coil domain containing protein 189. Transcription analysis showed that the derived allele activates a cryptic splice site resulting in a frameshift and premature termination of translation. The mutated CCDC189 protein is truncated by more than 40%, thus lacking the flagellar C1a complex subunit C1a-32 that is supposed to modulate the physiological movement of the sperm flagella. The mutant allele occurs at a frequency of 2.5% in Nordic Red cattle. Conclusions; Our study in cattle uncovered that CCDC189 is required for physiological movement of sperm flagella thus enabling active progression of spermatozoa and fertilization. A direct gene test may be implemented to monitor the asthenospermia-associated allele and prevent the birth of homozygous bulls that are infertile. Our results have been integrated in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) database (https://omia.org/OMIA002167/9913/).
  • Sironen, Anu; Uimari, Pekka; Venhoranta, Heli; Andersson, Magnus; Vilkki, Johanna (2011)
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Male infertility is an increasing problem in all domestic species including man. Localization and identification of genes involved in defects causing male infertility provide valuable information of specific events in sperm development. Sperm development is a complex process, where diploid spermatogonia develop into haploid, highly specialized spermatozoa. Correct expression and function of various genes and their protein products are required for production of fertile sperm. We have identified an infertility defect in Finnish Yorkshire boars caused by spermatogenic arrest. The aim of this study was to locate the disease associated region using genome wide screen with the PorcineSNP60 Beadchip and identify the causal mutation by candidate gene approach. RESULTS: In the Finnish Yorkshire pig population the spermatogenic arrest (SA) defect appears to be of genetic origin and causes severe degeneration of germ cells and total absence of spermatozoa. Genome wide scan with the PorcineSNP60 Beadchip localized the SA defect to porcine chromosome 12 in a 2 Mbp region. Sequencing of a candidate gene Tex14 revealed a 51 bp insertion within exon 27, which caused differential splicing of the exon and created a premature translation stop codon. The expression of Tex14 was markedly down regulated in the testis of a SA affected boar compared to control boars and no protein product was identified by Western blotting. The SA insertion sequence was also found within intron 27 in all analyzed animals, thus the insertion appears to be a possible duplication event. CONCLUSION: In this study we report the identification of a causal mutation for infertility caused by spermatogenic arrest at an early meiotic phase. Our results highlight the role of TEX14 specifically in spermatogenesis and the importance of specific genomic remodeling events as causes for inherited defects.
  • Harper, J. C.; Aittomäki, K.; Borry, P.; Cornel, M. C.; de Wert, G.; Dondorp, W.; Geraedts, J.; Gianaroli, L.; Ketterson, K.; Liebaers, I.; Lundin, K.; Mertes, H.; Morris, M.; Pennings, G.; Sermon, K.; Spits, C.; Soini, S.; van Montfoort, A. P. A.; Veiga, A.; Vermeesch, J. R.; Viville, S.; Macek, M.; European Soc Human Reprod; European Soc Human Genetics (2018)
    Two leading European professional societies, the European Society of Human Genetics and the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology, have worked together since 2004 to evaluate the impact of fast research advances at the interface of assisted reproduction and genetics, including their application into clinical practice. In September 2016, the expert panel met for the third time. The topics discussed highlighted important issues covering the impacts of expanded carrier screening, direct-to-consumer genetic testing, voiding of the presumed anonymity of gamete donors by advanced genetic testing, advances in the research of genetic causes underlying male and female infertility, utilisation of massively parallel sequencing in preimplantation genetic testing and non-invasive prenatal screening, mitochondrial replacement in human oocytes, and additionally, issues related to cross-generational epigenetic inheritance following IVF and germline genome editing. The resulting paper represents a consensus of both professional societies involved.